Pancreatitis in mini schnauzer

Common Questions and Answers about Pancreatitis in mini schnauzer

pancreatitis

As long as you can get her through acute attacks, you can probably manage the chronic symptoms for a long time. My Aunt had a mini schnauzer that lived to be 19 years old with chronic panc. :-) As for testing, I'd probably just go by how the dog behaves and what symptoms are present. If she looks bad, she probably IS bad. After that, it's a matter of knowing when she needs hospitalization. If she can't keep down water for a couple days, she'll need IV support.
My aunt had a mini schnauzer who lived over 18 years, and most of those years included chronic pancreatitis with a few acute attacks requiring hospitalization. Apparently pancreatitis is a big genetic problem with that breed now. Don't despair! Things are looking good for you both right now.
Pancreatitis pretty much does what it wants to do, for however long it wants to do it. This disease is a real heartbreaker, because you never know when, or if, your dog will respond to treatment. As you probably already know, the only treatment is supportive: withhold food, support fluids and nutrients via IV, and treat with strong pain medication until the episode passes.
consequently his liver went into failure as well. I understand that mini Schnauzers are very prone to pancreatitis. My aunt had one who had chronic pancreatitis for the last half of her 18-year life, so it can obviously be managed to a certain extent. Hopefully, that will be the case with your dog. Does your vet have any idea at all of what caused the liver failure? That would certainly give you both a better idea of what to expect.
While it IS possible to remove a gallbladder in a dog, the dog's anatomy makes it difficult and doing so in one so ill with pancreatitis generally isn't a good idea. As you've no doubt been told already, pancreatitis is an incredibly painful condition. Dogs are usually far more stoic about pain than people, but that doesn't mean their pain shouldn't be treated. My dog had a 75 mcg fentanyl patch and dilaudid while he was an inpatient.
That reminds me, when we first started Trilostane treatment my vet had me cut the capsule in half to make up the correct doze but after talking to the Pharmacy they said this was a big NO NO as the capsule has the drug and a lot of filler in and just cutting in half would not necessarily provide the correct doze. I would ask your vet if the Pancreatitis attacks play a part in Julie's numbers being off.
The symptoms you list sound like pancreatitis to me. When he goes in hospital, I assume the vets check his lipase and amylase levels and that is how they arrive at the pancreatitis diagnosis. Pancreatitis is one of the most difficult problems to treat - in humans as well as dogs. The pancreas is an extremely sensitive organ, and once it becomes inflamed and infected it tends to sulk for quite a long time - sometimes forever. It does not, however, mean a death sentence.
I took him to my vet and he was tested for pancreatitis, liver function, etc., none of which he has. I have had dogs who died from pancreatitis and that is why I am so concerned, but it doesn't appear that he has it. He usually just vomits up a bile like substance. I have him on a natural dog food (dry) called Wellness Weight Reduction as he's a bit heavy for his breed and size. He's never been able to tolerate treats per se so I've always given him apples or vegetables for treats.
My mini schnauzer has very simular problems. Our vet now believes its autoimmune disease which caused his liver problems. Only biopsy can confirm this, but because of the liver problems, my dog has slow blood clotting problems and thus cannot go into surgery. So we have just began steriod treatment to treat the autoimmune disease. We are just hoping the steriods will not worsen the liver... It is great that your dog eats well!!
I found this site while getting information on my Mini Schnauzer who has kidney failure and is having a bout with Pancreatitis. I will share my story at a later time. I just want you to know that you did everything possible for your Cissy and she is no longer suffering. I had a dog die in my arms 20 years ago and have had to put down 2 since. They are like your babies and they can never be replaced.
If imaging studies have not been done, it's time to take a look to see if there is a tumor or psuedo-cyst (pocket of infection) present. In addition to the severe nausea, pancreatitis is also an extremely painful condition - for both animals and humans. You might ask your vet if there is a medication you can keep on hand for flareups.
There really is no other way to treat this problem if that's the case. My Aunt had a mini-schnauzer who lived to nearly 20 years with chronic pancreatitis, so this dog's life isn't over by a long shot. What I would be more concerned about is the side-effects of the Cushings disease on the kidneys as evidenced by the excessive drinking and peeing. Once kidney tissue is damaged, it can't be healed.
Some dogs will have problems and flareups the rest of their lives after one bout of acute panc, and the same thing happens in humans. My aunt had mini schnauzer who had pancreas flares for the last half of her 18 (yes, that's 18 - not a typo!) years. Thanks for taking such good care of your pup.
First of all we have a 3 year old male mini- poodle. He has been in good health as of lately. His eating habits are table food and dry dog food. 7 days ago i gave him alpo beef, chicken, and lamb canned food along with his hard food that he eats. The next couple of days he was constipated and would strain when he would go outside to the bathroom. Eventually after walking around long enough he would finally have a bowel movement.
It appeared that she had vomited and could not get all of it out of her throat so she had a horrible death of choking on her vomit. She was a beautiful Mini- Schnauzer (5.7lbs)... I blame the vet for the vaccinations but how can I prove it?
Hi I'm new to this forum and stumbled onto it while looking for help with my dog not eating. I have a 15 1/2 year old toy poodle named Chloe. She was my daughter's Christmas present in 1994 but has really become my dog over the years. I have noticed Chloe not eating as much and losing weight but attributed it to her advanced age and problems with arthritis.
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