Imiquimod keloid

Common Questions and Answers about Imiquimod keloid

aldara

Avatar f tn i undergone surgery when i was 9 years old. it left a mark, a keloid. how do i remove this? is there any lotion or medicine that i can take aside from undergoing plastic surgery? thanks! more power!
Avatar n tn Keloid scars DEFINITELY can itch! The over-activity of the collagen levels produced irritate the skin underneath, and this is what causes the itching (and the keloid). While I don't know for sure if your growth is a keloid or not, I can tell you that there are remedies for keloids, especially in noticeable places, like the shoulders. Silicone treatments seem to be the best way to remove keloids minus surgery. I can give you some brand suggestions if you like...
Avatar f tn Hi, How are you feeling? I am sorry to say but after chickenpox, the scars would go on to develop keloids especially when you are prone to it. A keloid can occur after surgery, after major skin trauma but also after very minor skin damage, such as an acne spots. It is also possible to develop a keloid even if there has been no obvious damage to the skin at all. With this kind of information it is indeed difficult to say whether you can really avoid getting those keloids.
468411 tn?1207259284 Prevention is key, but therapeutic treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids includes occlusive dressings, compression therapy, intralesional corticosteroid injections, cryosurgery, excision, radiation therapy, laser therapy, interferon therapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin, bleomycin, verapamil, retinoic acid, imiquimod 5% cream, tamoxifen, tacrolimus, botulinum toxin, and other promising therapies such as transforming growth factor (TGF)–beta3, and recombinant human (rh) interleukin
Avatar n tn This is more like a keloid / scar and it would be best to consult your doctor about any creams or intra-lesional injections to help it go away or decrease in size.
Avatar f tn Prevention is key, but therapeutic treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids includes occlusive dressings, compression therapy, intralesional corticosteroid injections, cryosurgery, excision, radiation therapy, laser therapy, interferon therapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin, bleomycin, verapamil, retinoic acid, imiquimod 5% cream, tamoxifen, tacrolimus, botulinum toxin, and other promising therapies such as transforming growth factor (TGF)–beta3, and recombinant human (rh) interleukin
Avatar f tn My query is this: 1) I have a very ugly looking keloid on my shoulder. I've paid umpteen visits to the doctor and each time he suggested the same thing-- apply Contractubex gel. But this hasn't been of any use and it doesn't make sense to spend 600 bucks on a 20g ointment which does not show promising results. I've heard of this thing called "silicone sheet". Will it be helpful to give it a try? Do you have any other suggestions??
Avatar n tn Prevention is key, but therapeutic treatment of hypertrophic scars and keloids includes occlusive dressings, compression therapy, intralesional corticosteroid injections, cryosurgery, excision, radiation therapy, laser therapy, interferon therapy, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin, bleomycin, verapamil, retinoic acid, imiquimod 5% cream, tamoxifen, tacrolimus, botulinum toxin, and other promising therapies such as transforming growth factor (TGF)–beta3, and recombinant human (rh) interleukin
Avatar m tn I inquired to my doctor about trying Aldara, as I have some old aldara that I tried on my keloid scars years ago, he told me to "try it" and that it should work in three days, after reading much online about people having horrible experiences with this drug i chose to try condyline one more time in my last trial which is where I am now. Now that I can see the warts coming back again, my question is; Should I try using aldara?
Avatar n tn One consideration would be a keloid. This is an overgrowth of dense fibrous tissue that usually develops after healing of a skin injury. The tissue extends beyond the borders of the original wound, usually does not regress spontaneously, and tends to recur after excision. If this is the diagnosis, you may want to discuss the various options for treatment.