Blood glucose levels after meals 1 hour

Common Questions and Answers about Blood glucose levels after meals 1 hour

blood-glucose

Finding the perfect dose really is a balancing act, for I think many of us find that glucose levels do not remain exactly the same day after day. So many things other than foods affect those glucose readings, and so finding the perfect basal dose can be difficult when stress, allergies, hormone swings, activity levels, and occasional viruses cause glucose levels to rise and fall at unpredictable times.
My blood glucose was 95 after an overnight fast. I ate a bowl of Fiber One cereal for breakfast, and 70 minutes afterward my glucose was up to 146. Then three hours later it was 118. Is this prediabetic?
I had to monitor my blood sugar four times a day - fasting in the morning and one hour after every meal. I did really well during the day after meals...I quickly figured out what effected my blood sugar and what worked well for me. I kept my BS levels under the max (under 140 after meals). But my fasting blood sugar in the morning was too high - and I couldn't do anything about that. (MD wanted it below 90 in the morning.) So my MD put me on 5 units of insulin before bed.
Hello, I'm a volunteer and not a medical professional so please check with your doctor to address any concerns you have regarding your particular condition. With that said, below is an excerpt from the Virginia Mason clinic website: https://www.virginiamason.org/body.cfm?id=511 which states the norms for blood sugar levels: "A fasting blood glucose test. This test is performed after you have fasted (no food or liquids other than water) for eight hours.
The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a hospital) and taking no medicines that could affect your blood glucose. The morning of the test, you should not smoke or drink coffee.
After my blood sugar has returned to normal levels (101 mg/dL in 3 hours) can I be sure that I shouldn't have any symptoms of hypoglycemia or on the other hand if my blood sugar levels are in the normal range, I shouldn't have any symptoms of hypoglycemia? Or there is a possibility to suffer from hypoglycemia symptoms when your blood glucose levels are within the range?
Glucose peaks 2-3 hours after meals where the normal value is <180 mg/dl and the optimum is <140 mg/dl. Four hours you should be at or close to normal levels. Q: "If i make daily activity is it normal to have lower values? If i make exercise , can this lower my glucose level." A: Appears these are the same question on activity worded differently. Yes, daily exercise helps to lower your glucose.
I have had a blood sugar test and gave a reading of 6.1 about 1 hour after a breakfast (Weetabix, Milk, Orange Juice). I have to go back and have repeat test but after having nothing to eat approx 9 hours beforehand....will this give an increased or decreased reading.
My doctor is getting me to test my blood sugars at home on a home glucose monitor 3 days a week, 6-8 times a day. I am not doing the 3 hour glucose test. He feels it can be a false answer. Better to monitor it over the day and before and after meals. My hemoglobin A1C was perfect. But he says your levels can fluctuate during the day. Also my mom, dad, grandmother and brother were all type 2 diabetics. I think he is worrying for nothing. All my blood sugars have been awesome.
I failed the 1- hour and 3-hour with my first dd. I cut out all carbs and kept my levels low through diet alone. DD was over 9 lbs, but I think that was more genetics than blood sugar. The "good" things about it were that I only gained 13 lbs in the whole pregnancy, and I got more u/s and non-stress tests than usual to make sure all was well. The bad things were sticking my finger 4 times a day, no pizza for 20 weeks or fresh fruit in the middle of summer (that was the worst).
Now that I have type II, what are the ranges to aim for for blood sugar levels for fasting and then for 2 hours after a meal? Right now, I'm testing about 100 to 110 in the morning and about 110 to 130 after meals. If I forget to take my metformin at night, my fasting level is usually around 120 to 130. But, with the medicine it is 100 to 110 fasting. Is this good? Is it supposed to be under 90? Or can I not aim for that goal since I'm a diabetic and is it unrealistic?
I have been using a glucose meter that I was prescribed and there are days where my glucose have been what I consider to be normal, then there are days where I will run low an hour after meals or in the middle of the night.
More often than not exercise will lower blood glucose levels, but there are certain circumstances under which blood glucose levels can actually increase....... You are having fasting blood glucose levels of 110 before exercise... During strenuous exercise your muscles need more glucose so they send a signal for more energy which comes from the blood glucose or stored glycogen in your liver.
I was told to fast for mine and went in the morning with an appt (because with not having an appt it can take over an hour to start) and about 5 mins after drinking the glucose I threw it up. I've had so much going on that I haven't had a chance to go back for it. I'm 28 weeks now, is it too late? I need to call the office but it's huge and they barely even know one patient out of the hundreds they must see. I guess I'm just wondering if anyone else took theirs that late?
I did some searching last night for info about blood sugar levels and treatment but did not turn up anything pertinent. Who knows?! I keep telling myself that somehow it is a good thing and it must mean the tx is working :) lol I guess that is one way to make it through the days!
If you are truely concerned that your fasting level is high and that you think that other times of the day you are not producing an adequate amount of insulin after meals, then request your doctor to order a 2 hour oral/fasting glucose test. They'll take blood fasting, then have you drink a glucose solution and test again at 1 hour and again at 2 hours to see how your body responds. If they come back ok then you should be fine. Also have them check your fasting insulin.
This is my fourth. After the test I did not eat or drink anything for about 1/2 an hour, because we were picking up my son from school and getting lunch. Within 20 minutes of finishing the test, I got really shaky and sweating (Its in the 20's today) while waiting in line for my food. I nearly thought I was going to pass out. I was really worried that my sugar had gone too low, so I checked with my glucose monitor when I got back into the car. It was 55.
She thought maybe reactive hypoglycemia because I am having low fasting glucose levels as well as high. I went for a 2hr OGTT today and I am feeling horrible after the test. My baseline was 4.8 @ 8:55 Given 75g of glucose to drink At 4.3 @ 9:25 At 4.8 @ 9:55 At 6.2 @ 10:25 At 6.3 @ 10:55 After the test I went to eat something and started feeling very shaky and out of it at about 11:30. I took my blood sugar and it was 3.0. So I took 15g of dex (glucose) tabs.I tested again and I was 5.
As the baby produces more insulin in utero when baby is born and the glucose supply is cut off their little bodies continue to produce those high levels of insulin causing their blood sugars to dip meaning they need very frequent feeding and pssibly formula for the first 24 to 48 hours until they stabilise. It can mean a longer stay in hospital and the baby may be in the Nicu for the first day or two until the glucose levels in babies body stabalize.
I would pick yourself up a glucose monitor and take your blood 15mins after you wake up. Followed by 2hours after every meal. I am 19 weeks today. I have GD. I am on insulin at bedtime. I have changed my diet but even after the changes they decided on insulin. Like I said read up on what GD does to the baby before you decide not to take meds. If you don't like the one the doctor prescribed ask for an another.
I am concerned that if he keeps having too many high blood glucose levels, he would develop other problems either with kidneys, or else. He is using Humalog and Humilin injected with a seringe twice a day. Hi last A1C was around 7.2. He is a fairly active kid and will be going in a high school sport-study program where he will have to train about 2-3 hours a day for speedskating, including dryland (running, track and field) and ice training, weight training, yoga, etc... - 5 days a week.
Regarding glucose, buy a blood sugar meter and test yourself one hour after meals and again two hours after meals for several days to see how high you go. This will tell you far more than a fasting blood sugar test, which only indicates problems when you're pretty diabetic. Basically, you should not go over 140 at one hour, 120 at two. Eliminating refined sugar won't do the job. First of all, white bread, believe it or not, is way worse than any sugar.
The nutritonist gave me a glucose meter so I could check my bs after meals and fasting. After two months of excercise and diet change I have lost 15lbs. My blood sugar is no longer high in the mornings ( usually between 87-93) but now I've noticed it goes down to about 71-75 two hours after eating. I started checking it at one hour after eating and one time it was 139 then at the two hour mark it was 71. That was after having a grilled hamburger and 1/2 cup of mashed potatoes for dinner.
i was told that the results from the glucose test with 75 grams were fasting 86 1/2 hour 179 1hour 218 2 hour 135 during that test i almost passed out 15 minutes after taking the drink and was layed down in a patient room. i passed out/fell asleep and the remainder of the test was a complete blur. i do remember being woken up by being slapped on the back and yelled at but i really dont remember it coherently.
I had a glucose tolerance test done where they make you drink a soda-like drink that has a high sugar content and then they take your blood every so often after you consume it to see what your blood glucose levels do. Mine took a dive into the mid 40's and the lab technician had to move me to a room with a call button as he was afraid I might pass out.
"Metformin helps to lower your glucose by producing some insulin in the gut" ------------------- I'm a Diabetes Educator and I have been reading some of your answers and I'm amazed at the misinformation you are giving people. Metformin does NOT produce insulin in the gut nor does it stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin like sulfanylureas (like Glyburide and Glipizide) do. Furthermore, insulin is produced by the pancreas, not the gut.
I had one of those five or six hour glucose tests. My fasting blood sugar was normal to start. After drinking that horrible stuff my blood sugar started to fall and kept falling. It went below 50 and did not start to recover (very slightly) by the time I left. My doctor ( a different genius) said I didn't have diabetes. Big surprise, right? He did not address the hypoglycemia issue considering it unimportant, or nonexistent. So I bought a book by Carton Fredericks and took care of it myself.
Testing postprandial informs you how the foods you ate affected your glucose levels. Pretty simple, avoid those that do. Here are a few foods to avoid; foods made with white flour [breads, crackers], white rice, pasta/noodles [except Dreamfields brand], starches like potatoes. Eat quality proteins like fish and fowl, nuts and seeds, beans and legumes, fresh vegetables and small amounts of whole grains. Lastly, exercise 30-60 minutes after meals not before.
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