Narcolepsy with epilepsy

Common Questions and Answers about Narcolepsy with epilepsy

narcolepsy

Avatar n tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy" is actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines.
Avatar f tn feeling I have also had enormous trouble with sleep-which has just been diagnosed as Narcolepsy with Cataplexy, which could explain some of the fainting spells. I have had 5 lumbar punctures, which have indicated elevated incracranial pressure (ranging from 19-24 opening pressure), but the CSF fluid all came back clean-0 cell count in the fluid). The headache was temporarily relieved following the spinal taps, but only for about 24 hrs.
Avatar n tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy" and twitchy feelings are actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines.
Avatar n tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy," memory problems, insomnia symptoms, chronic pain, and twitchy feelings in muscles are actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (especially the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines.
Avatar m tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy" is actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines.
Avatar m tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy" and twitchy feelings are actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines.
354585 tn?1225913214 It sounds very much like narcolepsy. Recurrent "Bells Palsy," memory problems, insomnia symptoms, chronic pain, taste hallucinations, smell hallucinations, and twitchy feelings and weakness and paralysis in muscles are actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, people don't have "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too.
Avatar m tn The vast majority of doctors have absolutely no idea what it is or what it looks like, and no routine lab tests, MRI, CT scan, x-ray or anything of that nature will detect it. 75% of people with narcolepsy never get diagnosed in their lifetime. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines. I struggled for years to find an answer, and was misdiagnosed several times.
Avatar m tn I had it with just sleepiness during the day and what looked like insomnia at night for probably about 15-20 years before I ended up with more serious symptoms of narcolepsy that actually included cataplexy (random muscle weakness that can either be isolated, or widespread). The cataplexy manifested first in my face, as what looked like episodes of Bells Palsy that came and went when I was tired, stressed, or even when I was happy and smiling.
Avatar f tn The vast majority of doctors have absolutely no idea what it is or what it looks like, and no routine lab tests, MRI, CT scan, x-ray or anything of that nature will detect it. 75% of people with narcolepsy never get diagnosed in their lifetime. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines. I struggled for years to find an answer, and was misdiagnosed several times.
Avatar n tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy" is actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. I went undiagnosed for about 15-20 years, until I finally saw a sleep specialist and she nailed the diagnosis right away.
Avatar f tn memory problems, insomnia symptoms, chronic pain, and twitchy feelings in muscles are actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines. It doesn't look the way you think it looks.
Avatar m tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy," memory problems, insomnia symptoms, chronic pain, and twitchy feelings in muscles are actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines.
Avatar m tn The vast majority of doctors have absolutely no idea what it is or what it looks like, and no routine lab tests, MRI, CT scan, x-ray or anything of that nature will detect it. 75% of people with narcolepsy never get diagnosed in their lifetime. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines. I struggled for years to find an answer, and was misdiagnosed several times.
Avatar f tn There is the slightest posibility that you may have a type of epilepsy which only manifests in sleep, and it would be a good idea to either rule it out or see if it is present and needs treatment. Many people with nightime epilepsy never have fits during waking hours, so don't worry. My symptoms are different but if I was experiencing this I would tell your PCP. Also talk to family members, sometimes sleep disorders run in families.
Avatar f tn See a sleep center. Recurrent "Bells Palsy" is actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy. In fact, often times, it's not "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. It doesn't look the way you think it looks. Common misdiagnoses are depression, epilepsy, and migraines.
Avatar n tn memory problems, insomnia symptoms, chronic pain, and twitchy feelings in muscles are actually very characteristic of narcolepsy with cataplexy, and it can be exacerbated by the hormone shifts that happen with menstrual cycles. In fact, often times, people don't have "Bells Palsy," but cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate this, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too.
Avatar m tn I had it with just sleepiness during the day and what looked like insomnia at night for probably about 15-20 years before I ended up with more serious symptoms of narcolepsy that actually included cataplexy (random muscle weakness that can either be isolated, or widespread). The cataplexy manifested first in my face, as what looked like episodes of Bells Palsy that came and went when I was tired, stressed, or even when I was happy and smiling.
Avatar n tn See a sleep center. It sounds like narcolepsy with cataplexy. Viruses and some vaccines (namely the H1N1) can actually precipitate it, but it can happen seemingly in random fashion, too. I went undiagnosed for about 15-20 years, until I finally saw a sleep specialist and she nailed the diagnosis right away. The vast majority of doctors have absolutely no idea what it is or what it looks like, and no routine lab tests, MRI, CT scan, x-ray or anything of that nature will detect it.