Hysterectomy complications obstruction

Common Questions and Answers about Hysterectomy complications obstruction

hysterectomy

She is doing well after 1 week of being very ill due to a small bowel obstruction from her <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> and oophrectomy. Initially after her surgery, she seemed to be doing well but she wasn't able to hold down food and started puking green bile. They inserted a nasalgastic tube (NGT) that went through her nose into her throat and into her stomach area where all this bile was sucked out. She had this for 6 days and everyday she had xrays to check the progress.
I am a larger women, but have always had a small waist line (hour glass figure) and ever since these revisions and complications I am constantly bloated and in pain. I changed my eating habits which did not help much at all. Some days i look a little bloated, other days like today I am severely bloated from ribs down, and look like i did when i was 8 months pregnant. On this note, i had a hysterectomy 5 yrs ago so i have no chance of being pregnant.
I'am 35 years old and have an extensive history of SBO. Starting when I was 3 with a ruptured apendix setting up peritonitis, 2 weeks later surgery for SBO. At 10 years old SBO resolved with NG tube.
There are more potential complications and a longer healing time associated with <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span>. If the uterus does begin to cause problems though, the risk is that you end up having two surgeries. Remember that ultimately the decision is yours to make--it is your body. Your doctor should cover all of the pros and cons, especially including hormone replacement therapy if both ovaries are taken. I hope this helps you in making the right decision for YOU! Good luck!
I am scheduled for a Total <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> in mid-April. Initally when I decided to do the procedure I thought it would be a permenant birth control solution and give me seven days of my life back a month. However, I've done some research and have begun to question my decision. There are a lot of horor stories out there. I am also unsure about the research because the sample sizes are often so small in the studies.
Spend time researching any recommended procedure and ask your Urogynecologist about their success rates in that procedure and how many of these operations they do a week. You dont say how your prolapse is affecting you or what grade it is. Hopefully you have time to consider your options and get more comfortable about the choice you have made. Look at all your options. Good luck.
I will not know for sure if the doctor will do the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span>, as she is not willing to do the procedure unless there are complications. Is it bad to wish for complications? I want it all out. I have weighed the pros and cons. I know the hysterectomy provides only a 50/50 chance of getting better, but I am done with this disease. Fifteen years of suffering with endometriosis is enough. I am afraid of what will happen to my hormones after the hysterectomy.
CT abdomen and pelvis 10/1/2012. TECHNIQUE: Axial images from the lung bases to the symphysis are performed with additional coronal reformatted images. 100 mL of Isovue 370 are given intravenously. Oral contrast is also given. FINDINGS: The lung bases are clear. Abdomen: There is diffuse fatty infiltration of liver. Prior cholecystectomy changes are noted. A probable tiny cyst is noted in the lateral mid spleen measuring only 2 or 3 mm in size on image 27.
In January they did a trans vaginal ultrasound and found that the endometrial stripe was 28mm and decided it should have been substantially less. I had a partial <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> in feb, with the removal of the uterus and cervix. It was decided that the ovaries would stay. after the hysterectomy the ovaries were nicked and I developed a severe pelvic hematoma complicated by bowel obstruction, I needed six units of blood.
CT abdomen and pelvis 10/1/2012. TECHNIQUE: Axial images from the lung bases to the symphysis are performed with additional coronal reformatted images. 100 mL of Isovue 370 are given intravenously. Oral contrast is also given. FINDINGS: The lung bases are clear. Abdomen: There is diffuse fatty infiltration of liver. Prior cholecystectomy changes are noted. A probable tiny cyst is noted in the lateral mid spleen measuring only 2 or 3 mm in size on image 27.
As I am not a surgeon, my experience in post-op <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> complications is limited. In my internal medicine practice, I have not had this particular scenario before. There are several considerations. Adhesions may be a possibility. Typically, they present with crampy abdominal pain associated with nausea, vomiting, and abdominal distension depending on the severity. With the surgery, it is also possible that there may be some residual nerve irritation causing discomfort.
I also have noticed that about ever 6 weeks to 2 months the pain in my flanks is really bad for about 5 days its is almost like I am having period crapes but 100 times worse and I have had a total <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> over 7 years ago. And when it is really bad I go into the hospital and they tell my is could be kidney stones and send me home I go into my Dr. and he says the same thing and sends me to the ER.
Adhesions following an open <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> required a huge bowel resection, and now I'm just one big partial obstruction all over my bowels waiting for another total obstruction. Rule of thumb: more surgery causes more adhesions, causes more surgery to take down adhesions, causes more surgery... you get the idea. With some patients it turns into a vicious circle. Surgeons have been perfoming the lap chole procedure for many years now, and it is far superior to the open procedure.
Have had cholecystectomy in my 20s, appendectomy in my 20s, tonsillectomy in late teens, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> 4 years ago (still have ovaries) and left lung resection and pleurodesis after 4 lung collapses in 2010. This past spring, I had difficulty eating- really had to force myself to eat. Feeling full after a few bites. Also tired. Lost 10 pounds (was weighing 102 pounds). Chalked it up to stress due to a move and career change.
Hi everyone, My mom had a total hysterectomy and oophrectomy to removed the 2 masses on her ovaries and the fibrod in her uterus. Her CA125 level pre-surgery was 14 but because she is post menopausal (71 yrs. old) and has a history of Kidney Cancer the MD suggested removing it all. We were happy to learn that it the masses were dermoids and that it was benign. However, after 4 days in the hospital we were told she was well enough to be released.
I have had issues with chronic constipation following a laparoscopic <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> 15 months ago. Initially I thought I might have a post op ileus, but the KUB was negative. after losing 20 pounds on clear liquids because of severe symptoms which made me afraid to eat because of how I'd pay afterward, I had a CAT scan with contrast that showed colon narrowing but was otherwise unremarkable. An EGD a month later was significant for two peptic ulcers and I had my esophagus dilated.
Survival rates of LPM are very high at nearly 99% in early stages and still over 80's in later stages (and it keeps saying in later stages that morbitilty isn't from the cancer itself but from complications like bowel obstruction). The only thing I'm not certain of in my description is whether borderline and LPM are identical. I've seen them described identically in research papers, but not seen an actual statement that they are.
Twelve hours later my sister and parents were called asking how long it would be until they could get to the hospital as they needed to take me back in for another laparotomy by an Urologist to insert a stent, reimplant my ureter into my bladder with the complications of losing my left kidney. Thankfully I was lucky and my kidney was fine. I spent another day in the ICU and about lunch time on the 10th of September (my 21st birthday) the sedation was lessened and the breathing tube was removed.
I had a bunch of other complications too including a bowel obstruction. after that what my docs finally settled on was giving me colace and miralax daily and senalax if the other two arent working. Now I'm actually taking cod liver oil (2tsps a day) for other reasons and it has the secondary benefit of helping with my digestion as well. Obviously, I wouldn't do anything w/o running it by the doctors.
Have had cholecystectomy in my 20s, appendectomy in my 20s, tonsillectomy in late teens, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> 4 years ago (still have ovaries) and left lung resection and pleurodesis after 4 lung collapses in 2010. This past spring, I had difficulty eating- really had to force myself to eat. Feeling full after a few bites. Also tired. Lost 10 pounds (was weighing 102 pounds prior to this). Chalked it up to stress due to a move and career change.
The tumor was removed about a month ago (along with a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span>) and Chemotherapy was started 2 weeks ago. Information is very scarce on this type of cancer, and I wanted to ask the following questions: 1) What are the real chances that we can beat this? 2) Are there any alternative treatments we should consider to the Carboplatin/Taxol combination? 3) How difficult will the chemo be on my mother - she's 67 and strong, and 9 treatments have been ordered?
He has reschedule it for December 16. He says the thickening could be caused by a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> I had in 2001. I have never heard of this happening before. My husband wants me to find another doctor - he is afraid that it is cancer and doesn't want to wait. I have also lost another pound, so he is getting very nervous. Do you know if it possible that the hysterectomy could cause this, and if so, how can it be corrected! Thanks in advance for any and all information!
Hello, I am 23 years old and I am having serious issues and I don't know where to turn. I was born with gastroschisis and repaired with no complications that I know of. As a child I would always cry after eating and have constant bowel problems as I grew up (abd pain/constipation). I am now in my 20's and I feel like I'm 90. I have pain 24/7, I am always bloated and I have a BM like once a week if I'm lucky.
She went in for a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span> due to a benign tumor and they discovered the other ovary was stage III ovarian cancer and she had immediate debulking surgery and part of her colon removed and resected. She has had reoccurances over the years, as well as one more debulking surgery in Jan of 2007. The Doctor was so positive and confident that he got everything he could see with the human eye and he recommended six months of radiation but in May of 2008 the cancer came back.
people with adhesions do not have ongoing frequent symptoms. Usually, the obstruction is intermittent. Those with continuous or frequent symptoms of obstruction are often sent for surgery. Even though there is the risk of additional adhesions, it is often observed that the symptoms of pain resolve 9 I guess this means that the new adhesions do not necessarily cause obstruction). It is impossible to predict whether your adhesions will progress and your symptoms worsen.
I just wish I knew what exactly was wrong with me so I could deal with it(good or bad). Any chance they are giving me a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>hysterectomy</span>? Also, I live in Canada and you have to have a requisition to see a specialist. Before reading this site, I had no idea that there was suck a thing as a Gyn/oncs. Thanks for the comments and any info on the calcification stuff would be appreciated.
Thanks for the advice. It's great to know that I'm not the only one out there. Pain has really increased in last 2 days. I will see another surgeon this week just for a second surgical opinion.Surgery is next week.
There are natural and safer ways to shrink goiters and nodules. Low Dose Naltrexone shrunk my nodules. The only time someone should have their thyroid removed is if it is cancerous, and then save as much as you can. Once you have it removed, there is no healing it, and you will be permanently hypothyroid with medication the rest of your life. I healed mine with help from the book "Hope For Hashimoto".
MedHelp Health Answers