Nuclear stress test results interpretation

Common Questions and Answers about Nuclear stress test results interpretation

stress-test

holter monitors, stress test, cardiolite stress test. Just received cardiolite results - I'd appreciate y/opinion. Nuclear Perusion Scan Report: Following Stress, SPECt images reveal normal perfusion in the entire left ventricle. Rest images show no changes. Polar plots are consistent with these findings. Wall motion study: Gated images reveal normal wall motion and thickening throughout the left ventricle (should I be concerned about this?
EKG stress test: horizontal ST depression Nuclear scan: stress images reveal moderate in size, moderate in intensity anterior defect Rest scan shows: no changes Motion scan shows: normal contractility and thickening of the walls EF 68% Final Interpretation: moderate in size and intensity fixed anterior defect consistent with breast attenuation. Firstly, I have no idea what any of that means. Can anyone here explain it to me?
2 Is the class 2 hf rating because they thought I was ending the test? CHF is not a diagnosis from a stress test but from a clinical picture. Im not sure how this rating was generated. 3. Is there anything serious enough to be cautious with exercise? See above interpretation. You should discuss what exercise program you should be on with your physician. I've recently lost 55 lbs, and am just starting an exercise program. This is a great thing. Keep it up!
NBCT, Typically horizontal ST depression greater then 1mm in several leads constitues a positive stress test in men or women. There are also other causes of these findings including hyperventilation and spasm. There is no standard protocol. You have to interpret the results in the context of the patient undergoing the test.
This can be cause by a reversible defect or blockage in an artery and is usually verified by a nuclear stress test of a cath. Also, it would appear that your exercise and oxygen uptake tolerance were decreased as well/ What did your doctor have to say? Let us know.
53 yr old and just got results from a nuclear stress test. Findings showed SPEC images showed medium perfusion abnormality of moderate intensity in the basal and mid anterior myocardial walls on the stress images. The defect is present on the resting images consistent with prior myocardial infraction,. Gated SPECT images reveals diminished myocardial thickening and wall motion of anterior wall. There is no stress transcient ischemic dilation of left ventricle.
Here are my cardio's concluding notes from my nuclear stress test. 1. Normal exercise EKG 2. Moderate sized fixed defect involving the inferior / inferoseptal area suggestive of a scar with very minimal peri-infarct ischemia. 3. Moderate to severe LV dysfunction with inferoseptal wall abnormality. The LVEF is calculated at 34%. A separate echo cardiogram study gave 33%. As a background, I am a 51 year old man. I had a two vessel bypass surgery 8 years ago. The grafts are still patent.
I won't go into all the boring details, but it took some effort on my part to convince my doctors that I was concerned about my heart. I was given a nuclear stress test. My cardiologist said it showed no problems except that the bottom of my heart was beating slower than the top of my heart. He said he couldn't see it well on test results because of a shadow, but that if I wanted to look into it further that I should let him know.
I had a nuclear stress test done 11/17/09 and need some help interpreting the results..] RADIOISOTOPE UPTAKEIMAGING REVEALED: 1.) Moderate sized area of decrease to absent tracer uptake in the inferior, and the Infero septal segments at peak exercise, with complete reperfusion at rest. 2.) Moderate sized area of decrease tracer uptake in the mid apical anterior segments at peak execise.
Nuclear portion of the exercise stress test. I had intravenious injection of 6.8 millicurie of Myoview intravenously and 30 mins later underwent gated myocardial perfusion SPECT scanning under the gamma camera. Resting images were obtained. Then I underwent stress testing and had an intravenous injection of 24 millicure of Myoview intravenously and 30 mins later underwent gated Myocardial perfusion SPECT scanning and Stess images were obtained.
Im not sure from your interpretation, but it sounds negative. If there is any ambiguity in the EKG portion of a stress test a nuclear stress test can be performed. 2-Was the test results achieved good for aerobic sports, for free diving or for scuba diving ? Only the physician actually taking care of you can make recommendations for activity. 13 minutes is a good amount of time for a stress test. 3-Was the slow recovery pathological? There are a lot of parts of the stress test.
Every year for many years I go to the doctor and they do the nuclear stress test. I pass but during the test the EKG shows changes that suggest a blockage, however they can never find any blockage. If I have no blockage then why do I have changes in my EKG during a stress test that suggest this?
On my treadmill exercise tolerance test results (nuclear stress test), my cardiologist wrote in the "Interpretation" section: Summary: HR Response to Exercise: Appropriate. Chest Pain: None. Arrhythmias: atrial premature beats. ST Changes: 1mm Depression horizontal. Overall Impression: borderline Positive stress test suggestive of ischemia. My doctor told me verbally that my results were fine..
Hi doc/everyone -- Quick question regarding recent stress test results. I went in for cardiac SPECT imaging where they inject the tracer at rest and gather images, followed by a tress test, then the SPECT imaging again immediately following exercise. During the stress, I reached 15 minutes and 17 METS with the test ending b/c of fatigue. The findings said at just over 12 minutes of exercise I showed ST segment depression of 2mm in most leads, resolving just 25 seconds into recovery.
(4) Is a Stress Echo as good as a nuclear stress test? It depends. There are factors that can cause problems with interpreting the images in each one. However, if they are able to get good quality images in both studies then they are essentially equivalent.
Is a Echocardiogram going to be more prescise at determining what is going on with my heart chambers, wall, and other things that are not seen in the STress test? What other possible things show up on the echo test? I wonder according to what you said above, and the fact the Dr. has not seen the pictures of my heart from the Perfusion Stress test, Would it help at this point if he saw the pictures that were taken, because I have a copy of the Pictures on disk?
Your physical condition can also affect the interpretation of results with a normal stress test. I was experiencing shortness of breath during exercise so had a stress test which showed I had no problems. However, I told the doctor I did have a problem and he conducted an Echo stress test which showed a problem which was confirmed when an angiogram showed I had 3 clogged arteries. The normal stress test didn't show the problem because I run a lot.
Which is more reliable, the imaging or the stress test. Which should I believe. Stress says negative, imaging says positive. Is this possible. Am I sure to have blockages, because imaging is more reliable. A year back, my total cholesterol was 153 and triglycerides 221. Do not smoke. Thanks very much for your help. Posted by CCF CARDIO MD - DLB on July 19, 1999 at 12:08:20 Dear Jan Yes, the exercise part can be normal, but there can still be an abnormality on the imaging part.
This isn't Brooke_38, but I thought I'd chime in. The stress test is done to examine the functioning of your heart under duress, to see if there is a risk that, outside the hospital setting, you are risk of developing an emergent heart problem. It would stand to reason that if a severe enough condition exists, it's possible that the person would have some sort of cardiac episode right there in the hospital.
I'm a marathoner and 1/2 Ironman triathlete and I have recently had some problems with my breathing. Diagnosed as exercise induced asthma. Also had an exercise stress test and pcp told me that my tolerance to exercise was great but my EKG was, in a word, crappy. Scheduled to see a heart specialist as a result. I've been told by a number of educated friends that an abnormal stress test is fairly common for people that are fit.
Re: Stress Test Results - Please comment!! CCF CARDIO MD - DLB 7/22/1999 (2) Stress Test Results - Please comment!! jan 7/23/1999 (1) Re: Stress Test Results - Please comment!!
Stress Test Results - Please comment!! jan 7/23/1999 (1) Re: Stress Test Results - Please comment!!
58:14 Dear Jan The stress test results sometimes do show a blockage when in fact there is none. Likewise, they can occasionally show no blockage, when in fact there is one. Thus, no test is 100% accurate and needs to be interpreted in context. I hope this has been useful. I wish you the best of luck. Feel free to write back. Information provided here is for general purposes only. Specific questions should be addressed to your own doctor.
Smooth muscle ab .... A POSITIVE Smooth muscle ab titre .... A 1:80 Now, what does that mean? 3 weeks is a long time wondering. Does this mean he has some internal damage such as cirrhosis?
On my treadmill exercise tolerance test results (nuclear stress test), my cardiologist wrote in the "Interpretation" section: Summary: HR Response to Exercise: Appropriate. Chest Pain: None. Arrhythmias: atrial premature beats. ST Changes: 1mm Depression horizontal. Overall Impression: borderline Positive stress test suggestive of ischemia. My doctor told me verbally that my results were fine..
I had a nuclear stress test. My end diastolic volume was 78ml. Ejection fraction was 78%. This seems low for volume and high for ejection. Is my poor heart working too hard?
Hi Dr Junig, I have been researching online today some of these ssri/snri meds. Some people say they help with anxiety and depression and in some cases even help people with chronic, fibromyalgia or psychosamatic type pain. Many others are very against these medications and say they cause awful side effects both on the medication and especially if someone tries to come off of them.
1. Catheterization 2. Nuclear stress test 3. Do nothing but monitor What would you do? Thank you so much!
MedHelp Health Answers