Blank

Angiography for coronary artery disease

Common Questions and Answers about Angiography for coronary artery disease

angiogram

Contraindication for EECP: Peripheral artery disease or peripheral vascular disorders (blockages in the arteries or veins of the legs) I think that venothini should, therfore, follow ed's34 advice - as much as anybody should follow advice given here by non-cardiologists.
The doctors have prescribed some tablets for the disease and they said that the disease can be cured by tablets itself. is that so.. is it is necessary to a surgery. could you please clarify this.....
we wz advsd for angiography in the angio der is 90 %blkge in prxml left anterior dscdng artery..50% mid and distal lad stenosis..95% distal lft crcmflex artery discrete stenosis90%prxml OM1 discrte stenosis 40 %prxml RCA stenosis...90% at two brnches of circumflex while one of brnch of crcmflex is normal. In the RCA der is non sgnfcnt blkges as per reprt.he is RCA dominant. We r advsd with CABG...plz guide me whthr we shld go fr CABG or nt...he wz smoker in past...
Left Main Stem: Short Bifurcating vessel Left Anterior Descending Artery: Tight proximal stenosis followed by subtotal mid occulsion. Large sized D2 shows tight ostial stenosis. Distal vessel fills late andegradely. Left Circumflex Artery: Dominant vessel.
(RR 6F / NI) Left Coronary Artery: Left Main Stem: Mild Irregularities Left Anterior Descending Artery: Mild Generalized Irregularities and total occlusion at apex Left Circumflex Artery: Dominant Vessel with mild irregularities and a long moderate stenosis in proximal OM2. Right Coronary Artery: Non-dominant vessel with mild irregularities LV Angiogram: Antero apical akinesia with moderate LV systolic dysfunction.
The distal RCA is diseased.Thus three vessle coronary artery disease. 2 Recent IWMI 3 Mild LV dysfunction I too feel medication should be the first option. When twice lucky I may be lucky third time too.
The obtuse marginal also looks a bit high, 70% but in his case this is not dominant, this area of the heart is mainly fed by the right coronary artery.
Dominant vessel with total promimal occlusion. Distal vessel fills retrogradely from left system. Note: Also remember my mother in your prayers.
After undergoing a coronary angiography, my mom was told that 4 of her arteries are blocked at 50%, and the remaining 3 over 75%. The doctors advise bypass surgery. She has had 3 strokes in the last 10 years (2 most recently in '06 and last month) and has had diabetes over 35 years. What are her chances of surviving the surgery? Can medication help her at this point or is too late for that?
Here's the problem with the accepted gold standard of practice for identifying coronary blockages. Almost half of all people who have heart attacks are completely asymptomatic prior to having their event and almost half of people will die from the first heart attack. Additionally, we here stories all the time about people who had negative stress tests, calcium scoring and cardiac caths which show only mild blockages-only to go on and have a life ending heart attack shortly afterward.
Virendrav, These results from your coronary angiography suggest you have just isolated coronary artery disease at the left main artery (the beginning part of the left circulation system of the heart) and otherwise normal coronary arteries. It is impossible to give you any advice about what to do going forward without knowing a bit more about you (i.e. if you have exertional symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, etc).
Virendrav, These results from your coronary angiography suggest you have just isolated coronary artery disease at the left main artery (the beginning part of the left circulation system of the heart) and otherwise normal coronary arteries. It is impossible to give you any advice about what to do going forward without knowing a bit more about you (i.e. if you have exertional symptoms like chest pain, shortness of breath, etc).
NATIONAL HARBOR, MD. – Coronary artery disease was significantly more prevalent in patients with hepatitis C virus infection, compared with control subjects, based on a retrospective review. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology. "An association of coronary artery disease [CAD] with hepatitis C has been suggested, but definitive data are still lacking," said Dr.
Also other life style changes such as low fat diet, avoiding smoking etc as suggested for CAD (coronary artery disease), would need to be followed. Hope this is helpful. Take care!
Dear mistertalented, Based on these results probably your best option is to go for bypass surgery. This is severe coronary artery disease in someone who is quite young. In addition to surgery you need to drastically modify your lifestyle. If you are smoking you must stop. You need to discuss with your doctor changes in your diet and other healthy changes.
Based on this report, it suggests that there is coronary artery disease affecting all 3 coronary arteries. It also comments that 2 of the major arteries - the left anterior descending and right coronary artery have significant obstruction in the middle of the vessel. Unfortunately it is not only impossible to make a treatment/medical recommendations on just a coronary angiography report.
If you have known coronary artery disease, a traditional coronary angiogram may be a better option, since you can also receive treatment for your artery blockages during a traditional coronary angiogram. Since you are symptomatic but do not have known coronary artery disease, you can go ahead with the CT scan, based on these findings further therapy can be planned. Regards.
All indicated good blood flow to the heart. I wanted a CT scan to rule out any artery disease as a contributor to my a fib, but my cardiologists told me it was not medically necessary. I finally convinced them that it was for my peace of mind even if they thought it was unnecessary, and I would pay for it. The scan, a very simple and quick procedure, suggested I was 40-70% blocked in two arteries.
Tight distal stenosis involving the origin of obtuse marginal branch. Right Coronary Artery: Dominant vessel with total proximal occlustion. Distal vessel fills through left system. LV ANGIOGRAM: Good LV systolic function.
Left Main Stem: Bifurcating Vessel with Mild irregularities. Left Anterior Descending Artery: Moderate ostial disease followed by tight mid stenosis. Fair sized second diagonal branch shows tight ostial stenosis. Left Circumflex Artery: Tight Proimal stenosis followed by total mid occlusion. Distal vessel fills faintly late. Right Coronary Artery dominant vessel with mild generalized irregularities. LV ANGIOGRAM: Fair LV systolic function.
Coronary calcium scans, also known as heart scans or CT angiography provide pictures of the coronary blood vessel (blood supply to the heart). They provide information regarding the presence of calcium in these arteries and in some cases, the degree of blockage within the vessel Doctors and researchers dispute whether the coronary calcium score is actually useful.
(RR 6F / NI) Left Coronary Artery: Left Main Stem: Mild Irregularities Left Anterior Descending Artery: Mild Generalized Irregularities and total occlusion at apex Left Circumflex Artery: Dominant Vessel with mild irregularities and a long moderate stenosis in proximal OM2. Right Coronary Artery: Non-dominant vessel with mild irregularities LV Angiogram: Antero apical akinesia with moderate LV systolic dysfunction.
High blood pressure that is the most common cause of DD, also the cause can be coronary artery disease (occluded vessels) and treatable. An aerobic exercise can improve the diastolic function of your heart, and you should consult with your doctor the best exercise for your condition...an exercise program can be very useful and a possibility of substantial recovery to increased EF and/or increase the heart's compensitory cardiovascular system. Hope this helps.
Stenosis of LAD greater than 70% is an indication for Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. This may again depend on the clinical symptoms and general health condition. So, discuss with your doctor the best course of therapy. Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
From your results I think it is likely you have some collateral feeds going on somewhere because the disease is quite significant. On the left side, your left main coronary artery is 70% blocked and this vessel supplies all the left arteries from the aorta. Going down the left side, your LAD is 80% blocked, the Diagonal 1 is 100% blocked, the ramus is diffusely diseased (spread out), the left circumflex is 95% blocked at the obtuse marginal 1.
Though rare, you may have a heart attack during the procedure. Coronary artery damage. Your coronary artery may be torn or ruptured (dissected) during the procedure. These complications may require emergency bypass surgery. Kidney problems. The dye used during angioplasty and stent placement can cause kidney damage, especially in people who already have kidney problems. If you're at increased risk, your doctor may give you a medication to try to protect your kidneys. Stroke.
Coronary stenting in a patient with stable coronary artery disease is used to treat the symptoms. Specifically, exertional chest pain and shortness of breath. This is in addition to optimal medical therapy (blood pressure control, cholesterol lowering medications, anti anginal medications, etc). Stents in this situation help relieve symptoms. They are not associated with any mortality benefit. The average patient with stable coronary disease has a five year 5% mortality rate.
Clearly he has coronary artery disease, as there are several areas of stenosis (partial blockages of the arteries) which will probably need treatment of some kind. Fortunately, CAD is something cardiologists have a great deal of experience with, and treatment outcomes are improving daily.
women have a high risk after 75 Family history Genetic factors Hyperlipidemia (elevated fats in the blood) Patients known to have atherosclerosis and diagnosed with coronary artery disease or peripheral artery disease are at greater risk for vertebrobasilar disease and stroke. Diagnosis Studies of the vertebral and basilar arteries can be performed using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and standard angiography (X-ray study using injected dye).
MedHelp Health Answers