Trigeminal neuralgia gums

Common Questions and Answers about Trigeminal neuralgia gums

trigeminal-neuralgia

One of the causes of Trigeminal Neuralgia could be tumors. The Trigeminal nerve and its branches touches many parts of the face including the sinuses. (Google Gray's Anatomy (bartleby.com) for good diagrams of where the Trigeminal Nerve is). I personally have not heard that TN loosens teeth -- although pain in the teeth and gums (because of all the areas the nerve touches) is common. TN pain is usually controlled by anti-convulsant drugs such as Tegretol, Gabapentin, or Trileptal among others.
I have seen 2 general practioners, 1 dentist, 1 oral maxilofacial, 1 neurologist, and 1 neurological surgeon. Some say it is trigeminal neuralgia and 2 said it isn't because I do not have the pain that goes along with the diagnosis. I can no longer chew on the left side because I do'nt have feeling and I end up biting my cheek. When this first began my left cheek was mush from biting it so much but now I just don't use that side of my mouth.
I have recently been diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia but my symptoms are not really like I have seen on the internet. I do not have sharp, cutting or electric like pains that last for a few seconds. I have a very painful aching sensation that will last for 1 hour or longer. I have been on carbamazepine 200 mg for 3 weeks and while the pain is a lot better I am still in almost constant aching pain. Is this normal and will the carbamazepine eventually work?
Assuming everything is hunky dory, then we do start talking about Trigeminal Neuralgia. If you looked at the picture of the Trigeminal Nerve (cranial nerve V) and read my description, you'll remember that the nerve has three branches (Tri = three, Geminal = roots). V1 handles sensation from the top of the face above the eye. V2 has the middle part of the face, nose, upper gums/teeth, and upper lip, + others. V3 has the lower jaw, lower teeth and gums, lower lip +.
Wow, sorry, I missed this. It is a favorite topic of mine after learning a great deal about it when I had it. Trigeminal Neuralgia is literally a "pain syndrome of the Trigeminal nerve. This nerve is the 5th Cranial Nerve and supplies most of the sensation to the face. There is one on both sides. The Cranial Nerves are nerves that emerge directly out of the brain or brainstem.
Not having any doctors here to help me I went out of town to an emergency where they then put me on tegretol and told me I most likley have trigeminal neuralgia and set up an appointment with a neurologist.I was on tegretol for two weeks and waiting to go to my neurologist appointment but the pain was still unbearable so I went to the emergency in my city where they changed my meds and put me on neurotin which took a week to work and most of the pain is gone.
For those of you with trigeminal neuralgia, would you mind me asking you what it feels like? I have been assuming, for a while, that what I have in my face is bilateral trigeminal neurlagia. But, perhaps I'm wrong.
I was diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia about 10 years ago, and two years ago had a Micro-Vascular Decompression operation that did not fully solve the problem. I am on low daily doses of Carbamazepan (300-350 mgs) and luckily have 'precursers' (i.e., little electric-like shocks) that warn me before the full-blown pain occurs. I have now developed strabismis, where my binocular vision is 'out' because one eye tracks higher than the other.
What else could it be if it isn't trigeminal neuralgia? (sinusitis?) If it is trigeminal neuralgia - will it ever go away (it seems to worsen when I experience increased stress).
Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by frequent, excruciating paroxysms of pain in lips, gums, cheek, or chin lasting seconds to minutes. The Pain which is severe in nature, stabbing type, lasting for few seconds to minute and which has a triggering factor to it describes pain of trigeminal neuralgia. Physical examination of the patient is normal. Most patients cause is compression due to overgrowth like some tumor in its pathway. Typically presents in middle or old age.
It was more like the gums or something just below the gums along the lower jaw. I thought I had something wrong with my teeth, i.e. a cavity or something. Anyways, it sounds like that is what you have also. I don't, however, have any numbness now, although I remember having some when I first had it. It sounds like yours is more permanent or chronic, though. Again, thanks for your quick response! You guys are great here!
How successful are botulinum injections to treat atypical trigeminal neuralgia? My pain is centered in my left upper gums but spreads throughout the left side of my face below my eyes. Throbbing pain with knife-like pain are the usual problems. I always have some pain. Wearing glasses triggers intense pain. I've tried numerous medications with limited success.
Hello, I have been diagnosed with atypical trigeminal neuralgia, which my neurologist believes to be caused by inflammation of two front teeth in my lower jaw and the surrounding bone following a root canal treatment and multiple root end surgeries on those teeth. It took 8 months for the diagnosis (I went to see several doctors during that time because of lasting pain until finally I went to see the neurologist).
I have been under the care of a Vanderbilt neurosurgeon for the last six years, Dr. Peter Konrad. He implanted a motor cortex stimulator in 2001, with no effect. I have discussed all common treatments for Trigeminal Neuralgia with him as well as with Alana Greca, the nurse who coordinates the TNA support site, and I attended the regional TNA conference in Nashville last May.
I have been told that I have trigeminal neuralgia type 2 or atypical. Just last night I was coming down with a migraine so I took a imitrex. The burning pain in my upper and lower teeth went away. Could this possibly be facial migraines and not TN?
Has anyone else out there sought help from a chiropractor for trigeminal neuralgia? I went to one Wednesday and he said that he can do all sorts of stuff for trigeminal neuralgia. I was just wondering if anyone else out there ever did and if so did it work?
I was hoping those of you who've been through trigeminal neuralgia could tell me a little about how your problems started - I've been having some suspicious sensations in my jaw, and I'm worrying if trigeminal neuralgia might be in my future. It sounds just awful! I'm so sorry, for those of you who do go through it :( I've been having all kinds of weird sensations and nerve pain all over my body for a couple months now, but none of it was in my face.
You should ask your PCP for a referral to a neurologist or a facial pain specialist. There is pre-Trigeminal neuralgia which manifests as a toothache. Many people have unnecessary dental work done thinking the pain is caused by their teeth, when in reality it's the nerve. Hot or cold compresses can give temporary relief. I've also used Oragel rubbed on the teeth and gums to numb the pain temporarily. Let us know how you're doing.
With the Trigeminal Neuralgia is is lots of pain for me. It feels like my skin in on fire and shooting pain in on the side of my cheek, up towards the temple and near my jaw. Is this an MS related symptom? I have had this for years, and have always associated it with cold sores in my mouth. I have had the pain, and not the cold sore, but always thought somehow it was part of that virus.
There are differences between trigeminal neuralgia and Paratrigeminal Neuralgia one being that I do not feel pain if something touches my face. Now I don't know what classifies you as having "atypical trigeminal neuralgia." I do have a request for information in with a Dr. Kauffman in Manitoba who deals specifically with the "Neuralgia's" and I am hoping to hear from him in the next week or so.
If the X rays are fine, then I guess TMJ is a possibility. What about Trigeminal Neuralgia? This sounds more like TM than TMJ to me. Let us know what the dentist finds. Did the Lyrica help the pain?
Hi reby, I am new as of today, and got done with my post, and found yours. After years of being diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia, and telling Drs that I don't have it (no triggers, not bad, not getting worse), I have done lots of research. Sounds like TN to me-you should get to a neurologist-ask first if Dr knows about it; from experience, you will need a knowlegable and VERY curious Dr who will work FOR YOU to find out what's wrong. A good site is: www.tna-support.
Hi. I have been diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia and take Tegretol twice daily. I also have the sensation of my teeth vibrating as one person posted. It happens particularly when my medicine is low in my system-right before the next dose. It does happen other times, but not as intensely. During the intense times it feels like I imagine a person biting a live electrical wire would feel. I have told my doctors about this and they don't seem puzzled about it.
My retina surgeon first referred me to a neurologist, who thought it was atypical facial pain/trigeminal neuralgia. I later confirmed this diagnosis with with a neuro ophthalmologist at Univ of Pennsylvania. He said this is rare but he does have 2-3 patients who have experienced this same situation. I had severe side effects from the neuralgic meds that were prescribed and had to discontinue them.
I have had trigeminal neuralgia for almost 5 years. I have had MVD, Gamma Knife, Nerve Blocks and 4 days ago I had Balloon Compression. I have taken just about every medicine you can think of and am on ALOT of medicines. In addition I have migraines with cluster variance (this is what my neurologist diagnosed it as) whatever they are they are horrrible. I have high blood pressure, fibromyalgia, Crohn's disease, TMJ, Interstitial Cystitis, Reflux.
Welcome to the Trigeminal Neuralgia Forum! Here you will find a wonderful group of people, who have TN, suspect they may have TN or are being currently being diagnosed. We are all patients, not doctors and are here to support and share experiences and information with each other as we navigate through all the challenges TN presents to both ourselves and those in our lives.
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