Pacemaker generator change

Common Questions and Answers about Pacemaker generator change

pacemaker

Most of the pulse generator is actually battery. When discussing a battery change, it always involves taking out the entire pulse generator and replacing it with a new one. The risk of infection is 1-2% for generator change procedures. Antibiotics are given before and after the precedure to reduce the risk of infection. I hope this helps. Thanks for posting.
can I keep my leads stay intact, with the high-voltage lead in my right ventricle simply being used as a second pacemaker lead? Obviously I'm hoping I won't need a new lead, & am trying to avoid an added lead in the vein or (ouch) extracting & replacing the RV lead. I've looked & looked and read about generator changes, but can't find this, and I'm not scheduled to see an EP for a looong time.
But even that is many times the amount of electrical energy a pacemaker (properly a pulse generator) delivers. My device is currently running at 1.125 volts and is delivering a few microjoules per pulse. It takes a lot less energy to trigger a beat than it does to stop the heart so it can reset itself. If the person you mentioned was in a-fib and the bombardment of the AV node was causing it to go into v-tach and even fib, an ICD would be need to keep the patient alive.
When I went back for a 2nd ablation my EP and I talked about everything and I realized that if I was to have any chance of leading anything like a normal life I needed to get a pulse generator (commonly called a pacemaker) implanted. One year ago I did that. For me the upsides outweigh the downsides. But it still is a downer. As I said originally, even though there folks worse off than I am, there are many who are better off. People whose hearts have NOT betrayed them.
The pacemaker tech told me that my pacemaker picks up 2 beats late. Anyone knows what is this meant? Anyone's pacemaker has played this trick before? I really like to know but everyone said "don't know"! Pika.
Few years later, it came up that I need another type of pacemaker. The doctor offer a general anesthetic for the rest of life whenever it needs a pacemaker change. Last few years, I went through a lot of sedations when I have gastroscopy and colonoscopy. I didn't feel a thing, I slept through the whole procedure. I wish to ask, if anyone has a pacemaker implanted under the sedation? Did you wake up in the middle of the procedure? Did you feel pain or uncomfort during the procedure?
You could have isolated lead extraction if the generator didn't need to be changed. A lead could then be reimplanted without having to change the generator. You should discuss with the electrophysiologist who implanted the device. Hope that helps!
Taking warfirin and betapace af only at this point. Pacemaker generator replaced 10-08 and blood pressure gradually increased to 150/95 five days afterward until present. Previous pressures were consistently 110/70. Pacemaker pulse is set on 80 bpm. Colchicine was taken for 3 days just after generator change. Also have tinnitis with hypertension. So far, no relief with 50 mg atenolol bid and 80 mg betapace AF bid. What caused the blood pressure change?
I just had a new generator put in my pacemaker and my hccoughing continues, i had this condition before the generator was replaced and according to the pacemaker manfacture this is a reason for the change. Why am i still having this condition?
since then in 2005 i had a pacemaker generator change. i would like to know on average after you have the fontan surgery when a heart transplant is needed due to the left ventrical thickening up. also best and worse case scenarios also. As my doctor is now beginning to push real hard to put me on drugs and i prefer to use natural things such as vitamins.
6)Should I schedule my pregnancies around the time the pacemaker battery life will be ending? They can't do a battery change while I am pregnant right? Should I try not to be pregnant when the battery, say, only has like one year left? Thanks so much for your time. You are so kind to provide this service to people. Thank you again!
There are risks of infection that are cummulative -- if you are young and need a generator change every 8 years and you live another 60 years -- that is 7 device changes. 7 devices changes x a 2% risk of device infection with each change out is a over 14% risk of infection for the life of the device. In my opinion, you should try to avoid the pacemaker option. There is a risk of stroke with the left sided ablation procedures as well though.
I have gained 20lbs with no change in lifestyle or eating habits. The extra weight is all over. I can't help but think that it is somehow related to the severe mitral regurgitation. My Dr.just laughs when I complain about getting fat because I am still a normal wt. for my height but I am concerned because I have never weighed this much before unless I was 9 months pregnant.What is your opinion?
In general, it is usually safest to leave old leads in, unless there is a concern of active infection. In addition, it is not usually necessary to change leads if the generator is being replaced. Perhaps your old leads were epicardial (placed on the outer surface of the heart by a cardiac surgeon); if this is the case, then the approach would be different than what I have described. I hope this has been useful. I wish you the best of luck. Feel free to write back.
You do not want a pacemaker at your age. you would probably 5-10 generator change outs through out your life and the cumulative risk of these change outs is that an infection is likely. Pacemakers must be extracted if infected and this can be risk. It is best to stick with medications. If you have no symptoms, you do not need a pacemaker. Also, is the concern that my sinus pauses would lengthen and that my heart would eventually stop? It won't stop.
7 indicating a very great liklihood that ablation and cardioversion was going to fix my atrial fib, I elected to go the final step and have a pulse generator (pacemaker) installed and my av node disconnected. They worked me in and by Friday evening I had an uncomfortable lump in my left chest. Saturday morning they worked me in the queue and I had the final ablation. My atria can do what they please, my ventricles no longer care.
For Momto3 and others who held my hand before I finally bit the bullet and had the pulse generator implanted here is a one month update. First I feel better than I have in YEARS. I am more alive and more active. I FEEL more alive. I went in for a one month checkup at the EP's office and the device is performing absolutely perfectly. It senses my activity level well and increases my rate very accurately. It also senses my getting quiet and drops back to its rest rate of 80bpm quickly.
The very worst that might happen is that - somewhere WAAAAYYYYY down the road - you might - operational word MIGHT - need to have a pulse generator (pacemaker) inmplanted to ensure that when you have a spell of bradycardia (the medical term for slow heart beat) you are maintained at a workable minimal level. So make an appointment. If everything else is normal than there is no need to worry. Worrying helps no one - least of all the worrier.
The doctor explained that he may have to turn off the third lead (it is the Bi-V lead) and just allow the regular pacemaker and ICD to work. He was hoping that by inserting the third lead, he might also experience an improved EF. He is going tomorrow to see the EP, so we'll see where things are at that time. Do you know if your lead runs along the nerve?
If you have described things accurately he is likely to wind up with a pulse generator (pacemaker) implanted under the skin of his chest and feeling a LOT better. I know I do. I am in better health today that I have been in nearly 10 years. Good luck. Keep us posted.
When everyone agrees that the placement is good, they will tape the wire and little generator to your back. It is sort of like a pacemaker--sends electricity. You will have your whole back taped up, and you cannot bathe or shower for the length of the trial. You will have a battery pack to clip to your waistband. The remote is placed against the battery pack, so that you can change the strength of stimulation or switch programs. Please let me know if you have more questions.
So, yes, today was tire rotation day, Thursday is Pacemaker Generator Replacement Surgery and Sunday an invitation to a play by a neighbor (some mindless getaway time) and that's it for me until I get the MRI date for my last MRI before I leave. Neuro faxed order to cardio and now I wait and hope I can fit it in. Hope everyone has a good week!
Normally the SA node in your right atrium is the natural pacemaker, but any spot in the heart can take over for the SA node just in case it goes bad. Think of it like an extensive back-up generator system. It's a good thing. However, if one of the back-up generators gets antsy it will fire off a beat before it should happen. If the antsy spot was in one of the ventricles it is a PVC and if it was in the atriums it's a PAC. One is not worse than the other. They just are what they are.
I thought since this started with the change of the seasons that it was weather related, but now I think it is the magnesium....as I was already suspecting it for another issue I was having with vitamin D.....
My mother used to describe precisely those symptoms; turns out the vibration was just muscle tension, caused by not getting enough or good sleep.
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