Multiple sclerosis causes stroke

Common Questions and Answers about Multiple sclerosis causes stroke

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(getting this from my discharge referral note) My issues were left upper motor neuron facial droop and redused strenght in right arm, slurring dysarthria with uvula deviated to left, pathological reflexes in bilateral upper limbs with spread to fingers, normal neurological examination in lower limbs, CTB demonstrated no subacute stroke, MRI brain with gadolinium contrasted demonstrated multiple hyperintensities at the collosal spetal interface with perpendicular orientation without significant
Yes, please go to the emergency and get this checked. Numbness tingling in both legs can be due to spinal nerve compression, ALS, multiple sclerosis or due to peripheral neuropathies as in diabetes, hypothyroidism, Lyme and lupus. You need to get investigations done such as blood tests for diabetes, hypothyroidism, Lyme and lupus, MRI and nerve conduction studies. You need to consult a neurologist for this. Other possibility is an allergic reaction to something that touched your legs.
2 MRI's showed negative for stroke. Also blood work negative for Myasthenia Gravis or Multiple Sclerosis. Hospital said too much time had past, and only suggested possible mini-stroke. Tests did NOT confirm any heart damage. Only one small blood clot found in neck, but too small to do any surgery. January 18, 2007 Progressive Weakness and slurred speech. Current Meds: Diabetes and High Blood Pressure.
, transient ischemic attacks) which are vascular events that resolve without structural damage. Other potential causes include multiple sclerosis, a brain tumor, a vascular malformation and others. Lastly, transient one-sided body numbness (lasting for example for minutes up to 30 minutes then resolving) could be due to a migraine (the aura of migraine, in which case following the numbness, a headache occurs) or seizures (which would be important to evaluate given the prior stroke history).
I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis for the past 4 years. Doctor was thinking primary progressive. I am a 52 yr. old female who has Ankylosing Spondylitis and Ulcerative Colitis. I had my yearly MRI and now the neurologist is saying not MS but instead, the radiological terms are “non-specific micro-vascular change” or “leukoaraiosis”. My symptoms have been leg weakness, balance problems, muscle spasms, short term memory difficulties, left eye with Optic Neuritis.
Damage to nerves, arteries, smooth muscles, and fibrous tissues, often as a result of disease, is the most common causes. Diseases such as diabetes, kidney disease, chronic alcoholism, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, vascular disease, and neurologic disease also cause erectile dysfunction. Lifestyle choices that contribute to heart disease and vascular problems also raise the risk of erectile dysfunction.
However, patients of this age can still and do have TIAs and strokes. In this age group, causes of stroke can include vascular malformations (such as AVMs or cavernous angiomas), emboli from the heart, a hypercoagulable state (a tendency to form clots), oral contraceptives, vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels in the brain), certain metabolic disorders etc.
If your numbness was due to a stroke, it would start somewhat suddenly (over minutes) and would likely persist without significant improvement. Other potential causes include multiple sclerosis, a brain tumor, a vascular malformation and others. Transient one-sided body numbness (lasting for example for minutes up to 30 minutes then resolving) could be due to a migraine (the aura of migraine, in which case following the numbness, a headache occurs) or seizures.
Many causes of numbness in the arm are there. These include injury to the back or spinal cord, diabetes, stroke, multiple sclerosis and underactive thyroid. Abnormal levels of calcium, potassium, or sodium in your body and a lack of vitamin B12 can also cause tingling. Get your blood sugar and thyroid hormones levels evaluated. You can take some vit B12 for some days and see if the tingling is gone or not.
Also called called involuntary emotional expression disorder, it can be associated with psychological issues, multiple sclerosis, ALS, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or any number of conditions can cause brain lesions or damage the communications between different parts of the brain.It can also be due to a rare form of epileptic episode called gelastic seizure which presents with uncontrolled laughter.
These palsies are often caused by diabetes, but can also be the result of a head injury, tumor, multiple sclerosis, meningitis, high blood pressure or an aneurysm. The diplopia is usually resolved when the underlying condition is treated but some people may require additional help such as vision therapy, special eyeglasses or surgery. http://www.eyedoctorguide.com/eye_problems/double_vision_diplopia.
However, in general, some sensory loss in the face can occur with disorders such as stroke and multiple sclerosis, though with a normal good-quality MRI of the brain these can be excluded. Another possibility is a process affecting the trigeminal nerve (the nerve that supplies innervation to the face). The nerve could be affected in various areas of the brain, but other associated findings such as face weakness or weakness of the eye muscles would be expected too.
Certainly like you mentioned both stroke and tumor are on the differential. Other brain conditions like multiple sclerosis, infections, inflammation can cause these symptoms too. The cardiomyopathy may put him at increased risk of cardioembolic stroke if he has a low ejection fraction or he has atrial fibrillation or flutter associated with his heart condition. Depending on the site at which a clot might lodge in a blood vessel and cause the stroke the clinical manifestations can vary.
For example, infections or other irritants to the injured area can bring out the “stroke” symptoms. Other causes could include transient ischemic attacks, migraine, tumor, and multiple sclerosis to name a few. You say you have had a stroke before. I am not sure where the stroke is located and am not clear on the “lack of circulation in the brain area” that you mentioned, but I will talk a little about seizures following stroke given the broad differential.
Off and on all day. I am 41. My mother had a stroke around 42.Her mother had multiple strokes and my mom's brother had a stroke . I was wondering if this might be a pre-stroke thing happening?Thanks.
Common reasons could be stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, brain infections, multiple sclerosis and epilepsy. Common symptoms could be dementia, fits, and language disorders. Unfortunately there is no permanent cure of the condition, rehabilitation is the only effective way to help the patient regain function to the possible extent and prevent from permanent losses.
I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis for the past 4 years. Doctor was thinking primary progressive. I am a 52 yr. old female who also has Ankylosing Spondylitis and Ulcerative Colitis. I just had my yearly MRI and now the neurologist is saying not MS but instead, the radiological terms are “non-specific micro-vascular change” or “leukoaraiosis”. My symptoms have been leg weakness, balance problems, muscle spasms, short term memory difficulties, left eye with Optic Neuritis.
The most common is a benign tumor called a schwanoma (also called acoustic neuroma). This is diagnosed by MRI of the brain. Multiple sclerosis can cause vertigo, but often, other symptoms are present as well. A normal MRI of the brain excludes multiple sclerosis. Thyroid problems can also lead to vertigo. Strokes may cause a person to be “dizzy” depending where the stroke is. Also, traumatic brain injury can cause dizziness.
Jeffrey N Gingold. It doesn't tell you how to make the cognitive difficulties go away, but, it does give numerous strategies to deal with them and keep life moving along smooth.
My husband gave me an aspirin when he realized I couldn't respond to him and took me to the hospital 5 min. from our home. I was treated as a stroke patient and sent to the downtown Toronto Stroke Centre. Unfortunately, by the time I arrive by ambulance, (about 3 hrs. later), it was too late to administer the 'stroke buster' shot that was planned. After about 4 hours, slowly, I began to regain feeling in my left fingers and forearm.
consult a neurologist for assessment of these symptoms since these could mean multiple sclerosis. The symptoms of multiple sclerosis are loss of balance, muscle spasms, numbness in any area, problems with walking and coordination, tremors in one or more arms and legs.
The possible causes of increased or brisk reflexes are stroke, upper motor neuron lesions, and blood clot in brain or ischemic stroke, hemorrhage into brain tissue or hemmorhagic stroke, brain tumor, trauma causing brain damage, multiple sclerosis, infections, HIV and at times in anticipation of the neurological examination. These causes need to be correlated with history, neurological examination and clinical findings and MRI findings.
Excessive or misplaced tissue iron now is recognized to pose a substantial health risk for an extensive array of endocrinological, gastrointestinal, infectious, neoplasmic, neurodegenerative, obstetric, ophthalmic, orthopedic, pulmonary and vascular diseases. Ingested, injected, inhaled and decompartmentalized iron contributes not only to disease, but also to aging and mortality.
Anxiety and panic attacks, food allergies, diseases affecting the nervous tissue like herpes zoster due to reactivation of a chicken pox virus in trigeminal roots or cervical nerves, Lyme disease, trigeminal neuralgia, epilepsy, guillian barre syndrome, multiple sclerosis, tabes dorsalis or syphilitic myelopathy, metabolic causes like hypo and hyper calcemia, hypo and hyper kalemia, B1, B6 and B 12 deficiency, hypoglycemia in diabetics, chronic alcoholics, stroke and transient ischemic attac
It is very difficult to diagnose dysarthria on net. Apart from brain related causes like stroke, transient ischemic attack, brain tumor, bleed etc, dysarthria can be due to hypoglycemia, kidney or liver dysfunction, sickle-cell anemia, Wilson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis or lead/mercury poisoning or due to electrolyte imbalance. Local causes like fixed tongue, thick tongue, and cracked tongue should be looked into.
(Although it was suggested that the third time wasn't Bell's Palsy but a minor stroke as he died from a major stroke several years later.) Unfortunately I don't think it's known what causes it, so a repeated occurrence is unpreventable.
Pressure on the spinal nerves , Pressure on peripheral nerves , poor blood circulation , Multiple Sclerosis , Stroke , Vitamin deficiency , Electrolyte imbalance , toxic nerve damage and many others . Please consult a physician and neurologist for the diagnosis and treatment . Hope this helps you . Take care and regards !
These changes are seen in multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's or Wilson's Disease, migraine headaches, diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Though they are of no immediate threat, all these causes, and the presence of ischemic changes can be a risk factor for future stroke.
These changes are seen in multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's or Wilson's Disease, migraine headaches, diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Though they are of no immediate threat, all these causes, and the presence of ischemic changes can be a risk factor for future stroke. Hence, prevention methods should include a healthy lifestyle, and a combination of diet, exercise, and medicines. Please discuss with your treating doctors.
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