Lamotrigine long term effects

Common Questions and Answers about Lamotrigine long term effects

lamictal

org/depression/meds/moodstabilizers.htm It would explain the specific side effects both long term and short term each has. You could also look at the medication websites themselves and then discuss all this with your psychiatrist and they could decide what medication would be right for you.
He's been my doctor for about 9 years. He is a very good doctor and very attentive. Everyone could be afraid of the side effects of Lamotrgine and I wonder how many of his clients have call him in the middle of night asking if dandruff itch is the start of of SJS? I'm sure he has to deal with a bunch of nervious nellies. I tried it and didn't work out. I'm not the type to blame the doctor...things happen. We just take all the broken pieces and start all over again.
ONE important thing to remember that I learned, and have never forgotten is that these two effects CANNOT exist without anxiety.....but that anxiety can exist without these sensations. Derealization is basically a change, an alteration in the PERCEPTION or experience of the external world....in other words...everything LOOKS very strange, very "unreal" (movie like, in my experiences). Depersonalization is a subjective experience of unreality of one's self. So the difference is...
What are the long-term effects of a psychotropic (lamotrigine) and its propensity for binding to melanin in the eyes? Will a person lose vision in later life? Does this phenomenon contribute to ARMD or increase one's risk for glaucoma or vision loss? Can one ward off damage to photoreceptor cells or counteract the potential risk from medications?
Detrol or urotel as well as other antimuscarinic agents can treat the bladder irritation, but these should not be used as an option for long-term management of your symptoms. Usually, any drug causing severe or significant side effects is discontinued and another substitute drug will be used. Hence, it would be helpful to get your prescribing doctor to prescribe an alternative to lexapro.
Its possible side effects include nausea, diarrhea, sedation, polyuria (increased urination), increased thirst, tremors, hypothyroidism, and weight gain, to name a few. Long-term treatment with lithium or some other mood-stabilizer is usually the standard of care in the treatment of bipolar disorder. There are other mood stabilizers, Valproic acid (Depakote) being the most common. It is not without side effects (e.g.
Has anyone been givin lamotrigine for panic attacks and anxiety, and did it work and what were the side effects i take xanax but my doctor dosent want me on that long term and now he tryin this..
does anyone know how long the effects of the hormone last on the endometrium? i'm panicking that if i do conceive, i'll miscarry too. any thoughts?
Are there any other drugs/homeopathic aides that don't have the serious side effects of long-term lithium use? She also has IBS and has had her gall bladder removed and weight problems (steroids during chemo and lithium since then). This young woman is only 22 and has not had a great medical history...am hoping progess is being made in bi-polar where treatment is kinder to the body, hair, etc.
Careful supervision is required during drug withdrawal, since severe depression as well as the effects of chronic overactivity can be unmasked. Long-term follow-up may be required because of the patient’s basic personality disturbances." I'm not sure if this info. is of value to you, but I thought I'd pass it along.
trileptal, there is limited data on effectiveness for bipolar. If it's working for you, no reason to discontinue it, but there may be bettter options. Are you experiencing any side effects from your meds?
Some patients are now being maintained on lamotrigine on a long term basis in an attempt to prevent future episodes. Evidence regarding the effectiveness of lamotrigine as a long-term prophylactic agent is increasing. vicki you are right it was the first drug that came out that said could deal with both the manic and depressive state of BP disorder ....
Since they are addictive I would be very surprised if your doctor gave you benzo's for long term therapy. Especially if this is for bipolar and not anxiety.
Phenytoin and primidone are effective antiepileptics drugs, although phenytoin can cause liver failure or have other harmful long-term effects in patients with PME. Sodium valproate is an alternative therapy for myoclonus and can be used either alone or in combination with clonazepam.' 'Levetiracetam, a newer anticonvulsant is often used as an add-on therapy but may be used alone. It has few side effects — dizziness, drowsiness, weakness — and is generally well tolerated.
The reaction may not happen with other medications, or maybe a different class of medications like a mood stabilizer like lamotrigine. Which is a lot less harsh on the system and doesn't have such long term effects, but is more for the ups and downs and won't help much with psychosis. If she has psychosis, probably going to end up on some sort of antipsychotic. The drug companies are pushing Abilify for bipolar but it isn't always the answer.
It would depend on how the medications are helping her as contrasted to any side effects she is experiencing or the potential of long term side effects and that is best discussed with a psychiatrist. This is some information on mood stabilizers and mood disorders that you could discuss with her psychiatrist: http://www.medhelp.org/tags/health_page/34/Mental-Health/Useful-Bipolar--Depression-Webisites?
Seroquel (brand name for the other medication you mentioned) is an antipsychotic and like all current antipsychotics the short term side effects are the potential of weight gain and short term movement disorders. I found it to be sedating but each person responds differently to each medication. It does have strong mood stabilization properties. I was on Lamictal a long time and I found that to be helpful as well. It took a while to build up to a full working dose.
Zyprexa is actually a pretty good antidepressant, but its side effects suck enough that people are reluctant to go on it long term.
The concerns about weight gain and diabetes are realistic, cardiovascular concerns depends on the specific medication and short term and long term movement disorders are another standard concern. All of this information is on the medication website and you could discuss it with your psychiatrist. The risk/benefit ratio is worthwhile when an antipsychotic is prescribed to treat psychosis or associated concerns.
Most of the antipsychotics will have the same weight gain effects, and have more long term effects like metabolic syndrome and diabetes. It may also just be the dosage is too high. Sometimes even a little bit less of a dose will lessen the flattening without wrecking the clinical aspects. It also wouldn't hurt to add Omega Oils to the mix. I take 2000mg a day and really notice a difference. I take Jameson ones. 6 capsules a day.
Hello there. I'm not a Dr or qualified medically but I am a long term sufferer of BPD and all if symptoms. I've been taking various meds over the years (UK). Everything that ILADVOCATE says here is absolutely right and these meds are mood stablisers which have shown to be very helpful to many folk. However the symptoms you have mentioned do seem excessive and could be because it's early days in treatment, BUT I'd sure mention these symtomns to your Dr.
so long term memory is stored in your hard disk but short term is volatile. don't give it much importance.
the first two are fatal, no matter what, the spina bifida is a serious defect that could have long term, mostly likely fatal, effects on the child. These are just a few of the things that could happen during a pregnancy. I found the most helpful research was googling things like "seroquel and pregnancy" "lamictal and pregnancy". The results are heart wrenching.
Something like lamotrigine has a pretty low side effect profile if you titrate up slowly. I haven't seen any scary studies about its use long term. It is good for bipolar 2 because it works well on the depression side of things that lithium doesn't. Lithium is better at controlling mania.
Actually i do not remember if i searched the side effects of Lmictal on any site,,it is just i came across it in many forums and all of them agree that Lmictal affects short memory loss but not long memory Here are the links for these forums http://www.bipolarworld.net/Phelps/ph_2006/ph1419.htm http://bipolar.about.com/b/2003/06/29/does-lamictal-cause-memory-loss.htm http://www.depressionforums.org/forums/Lamictal-Loss-Concentration-Short-Te-t22117.html http://www.dr-bob.
Lithium is not a med that really is used too commonly anymore, due to some bothersome side effects and long-term effects. Lithium is primarily used to treat the manic episodes of BPD, therefore that med can also worsen symptoms of depression. Can you share what all you're diagnosed with? Before he Rx'd these last two drugs, were you Rx'd anything else, besides the Xanax? If you can, I would seek out a second opinion from another p-doc. Update us, okay?
I mean at those doses all I see is a profit generator for medical companies - if they act as sedating my question to the doc would be why do I need sedating? Isnt there an effective MS that can replace al of these meds which are long term not going to do you much good..
The only side effect of concern that would be one to watch out for is gastritis and if that occurs you would need to ask your psychiatrist to change you to another medication as that can develop into something long term as happenned as with a friend of mine and other people. But that happens over time. Just check to see if it upsets your stomach. Other than that there are no specific side effects of concern.
how can any doctor or patient keep track of what side effects are being caused by what, what new side effects are being intorduced by adding another drug to counteract the problems of the first, what's helping what, and what are the short and long term effects of having a slew of substances in the body? Personally I take the approach that where I can, I find out what's causing the problem and remove that before considering adding something as a remedy.
As far as meds go lamotrigine is one of the easiest to tolerate and few long term effects. As for divorce because you are considered disabled he would most likely have to continue to pay support to you until you got married again (if you got married again). Him locking you in the psyc ward would further your case not hinder it. All I can say is get a good lawyer. You would be eligible for at least half of the possessions. Being mentally ill does not affect your property rights.
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