Glatiramer acetate

Common Questions and Answers about Glatiramer acetate

copaxone

Hi, Does anybody know how individuals respond to Copaxone (glatiramer acetate)?
The ongoing US Glatiramer Acetate (GA) Trial is the longest evaluation of continuous immunomodulatory therapy in relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). The objective of this study was to evaluate up to 15 years of GA as a sole disease-modifying therapy. Two hundred and thirty-two patients received at least one GA dose since study initiation in 1991 (mITT cohort), and 100 (43%, Ongoing cohort) continued as of February 2008.
5 were randomized to receive short-term induction therapy with mitoxantrone (three monthly 12 mg/m2 infusions) followed by 12 months of daily glatiramer acetate (GA) therapy 20 mg/day subcutaneously for a total of 15 months or daily GA 20 mg/day for 15 months. MRI scans were performed at months 6, 9, 12 and 15. The primary measure of outcome was incidence of adverse events; secondary measures included number of Gd-enhanced lesions, confirmed relapses and EDSS changes.
Does anyone know if it's safe to take Minocycline with Copaxone (Glatiramer acetate). Minocycline for acne and Copaxone for MS.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for filing Mylan Pharmaceutical Inc.'s abbreviated new drug application (ANDA) for Glatiramer Acetate Injection (20 mg/mL), a generic version of Teva's Copaxone®, a product indicated for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. This will probably take awhile before a generic is available in the U.S., but at least Teva will no longer have a one of a kind MS drug.
COPAXONE®(glatiramer acetate injection) copaxone (glatiramer acetate) injection [Aventis Pharmaceuticals Inc.] DESCRIPTION ... Patients should be instructed on the safe disposal of full containers ... dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/archives/fdaDrugInfo.cfm?
■Abilify® - Otsuka America (aripiprazole) Tablets ■Ambien® - Sanofi-Synthelabo (zolpidem tartrate) ■Abilify® - Bristol-Myers Squibb (aripiprazole) Tablets ■Cogentin® Injection - Merck (Benztropine Mesylate) ■Copaxone® - Teva Neuroscience (glatiramer acetate injection) ■Copaxone® tablets - Roche Laboratories (ribavirin, USP) ■Copegus® tablets - Roche Laboratories (ribavirin, USP) ■Cozaar® tablets - Merck (losartan potassium tablets) ■Eldepryl® capsules (Somerset) (SELEGILINE HYDROCHLORIDE) ■E
Treatment with glatiramer acetate or the interferon may limit the number of new black holes that became permanent; i.e., reduce progression of brain atrophy, and the interferon seemed to be slightly better at it. There is no control (i.e., untreated) group for comparison of how well the ************** worked vs. no treatment at all.
Study Shows Teva's Copaxone Repairs Tissue In Multiple Sclerosis (RTTNews.com) - Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (TEVA) Tuesday said a new imaging technique found evidence of tissue repair in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients treated with Copaxone. Copaxone is indicated to reduce the frequency of relapses in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis or RRMS, including patients who have experienced a first clinical episode and have MRI features consistent with multiple sclerosis.
two formulations of interferon beta-1a (Avonex and Rebif) and one of interferon beta-1b (Betaseron). A fourth medication is glatiramer acetate (Copaxone). The fifth medication, mitoxantrone, is an immunosuppressant also used in cancer chemotherapy, is approved only in the USA and largely for SPMS. Finally, the sixth is natalizumab (marketed as Tysabri). All six medications are modestly effective at decreasing the number of attacks and slowing progression to disability.
First of all, keep in mind that I am unable to diagnose you because I am unable to examine you, this forum is for educational purposes. The interferon beta and glatiramer acetate (another common MS med) are not immunosuppresents, and thus they CAN be given when Hep B vaccine (or any other) are given.
two formulations of interferon beta-1a (Avonex and Rebif) and one of interferon beta-1b (Betaseron). A fourth medication is glatiramer acetate (Copaxone). The fifth medication, mitoxantrone, is an immunosuppressant also used in cancer chemotherapy. Finally, the sixth is natalizumab (marketed as Tysabri). All six medications are modestly effective at decreasing the number of attacks and slowing progression to disability.
New data presented provided evidence that long-term treatment with COPAXONE® (glatiramer acetate injection) may offer sustained protection from neuronal/axonal injury. This protective effect was reflected biologically by a significant increase in N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a specific marker of neuronal mitochondrial function, in treated versus non-treated relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) patients.
I read a research paper on Minocycline (acne medication) being proposed as an add-on therapy to improve the efficacy of glatiramer acetate (Copaxone) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. However, this study was 5 years ago in 2007. Is this still accurate and reliable? What was the conclusion on this study? Does Minocycline (accompanied with Copaxone) help with MS or not? Here is the link. http://www.msrc.co.uk/index.
Last time my injection training nurse was over, she mentioned this trial to me. I feel very ambivalent about it, since I would LOVE to inject less often, but I think going off my daily schedule might lead me to forget to inject once in a while... I'm obsessed with compliance.
Copaxone is Glatiramer Acetate.) I'll be honest, another reason I gave it a miss was the possibility of welts and lipoatrophy. What can I say? I'm vain! However I do think the latter is significantly lessened with vigilant injection site rotation. And now with the reformulation meaning fewer than half of the injections in the first place, I imagine the risk goes down even further. Another reason the news you mention is great! There are loads of past and present users on here.
You should discuss this with your doctor, and then discuss disease modifying therapy( either an interferon ot glatiramer acetate). The clumsiness could be secondary to the medication at higher doses, but at lower doses it should not cause this. Good luck.
I have a very mild form of MS and take a daily injectable medication called glatiramer acetate...not sure if that could be the cause of the problem? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
These include disease-modifying therapies such as beta-interferons, glatiramer acetate, and natalizumab. Disease-modifying therapies requiring frequent, self-administered injections can be particularly troublesome for some patients, as they may result in localized skin reactions at the injection site. A variety of injection-site reactions (ISRs) have been reported, including pain and erythema, lipoatrophy, abscesses and infections, necrosis, rash, swelling, and lumps.
Advantage Safe - antihistamines are established drugs with less severe side effects than current MS treatments e.g., interferon-beta, glatiramer acetate, high-dose IV immunoglobulins, monoclonal antibodies against a-4 integrin and steroids) Convenient - oral administration is easier for patients costs to produce and store these compounds are lower than existing treatments" Cost= $5.00 per month I also found the following which should be of interest here: http://www.
A fourth medication is glatiramer acetate (Copaxone). The fifth medication, mitoxantrone, is an immunosuppressant also used in cancer chemotherapy. Finally, the sixth is natalizumab (marketed as Tysabri). All six medications are modestly effective at decreasing the number of attacks and slowing progression to disability.
Full story Two MS Drugs No Better than One NEW ORLEANS -- Among patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, little clinical benefit was seen for combining glatiramer acetate with interferon beta-1a versus either drug alone in a large randomized trial.
1. Relapsing forms of MS to slow the progression of disability, decrease the frequency of MS attacks, and reduce the number and volume of brain lesions seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). 2. In 2003 Avonex was approved for the treatment of a single event suggestive of MS (called clinically isolated syndrome, or CIS) to delay the onset of clinically definite MS and to decrease the number and volume of active brain lesions on MRI.
These are interferon beta-1a, interferon beta-1b, and glatiramer acetate, respectively. All were approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating RRMS. These drugs have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating either RRMS or all relapsing forms of MS. Some of the drugs have also been approved for “clinically isolated syndrome” (CIS), which refers to the initial symptom a patient reports prior to a diagnosis of MS.
The National MS Society’s National Clinical Advisory Board recommends that treatment with an immunomodulating drug (such as FDA-approved interferons or glatiramer acetate) be considered as soon as possible following a definite diagnosis of MS with active disease (i.e., recent relapses and/or new lesions on MRI), and may also be considered for patients with a first attack who are at high risk of developing MS (known as clinically isolated syndrome).
0001) versus placebo at two years. The CONFIRM study's reference comparator, glatiramer acetate (GA; 20 mg subcutaneous daily injection), reduced the ARR by 29 percent (p< 0.02) compared with placebo at two years..." Like Gilenya, the future will tell what impact the new oral DMDs (and BG-12 above) will have on MS, and the quality of the lives for those who are on them - but for now, I'm definitely excited.
Some doctors actually beleive that they are two seperate diseases (ie with different causes and mechanisms) but this is controversial. Beta interferons and glatiramer acetate have been found to reduce clinical attacks and MRI progression in relapsing MS but not in progressive MS. There are some treamtents to slow the disease process in progressive MS such as pulse steroids. The treatment is best planned by a specialist in MS.
Aerophagia and resulting eructation (belching burping) isa rare symptom of MS. In people taking glatiramer acetate (Copaxone(r)), it has been listed as a rare side effet.
I assume you refer to interferon beta-1a or 1-b injections, glatiramer acetate injections or natalizumab injection. Even though these drugs are immunosuppressants, there is no evidence that they can produce a late HIV sero-conversion, even though the literature on this is limited, but their mechanism of action is different to the production of HIV antibodies. In any case, I strongly beleive that all of this is irrelevant in your case, becuase you did not put yourself at risk whatsoever.
htm Copaxone is not an interferon - it is a glatiramer acetate - and it also works to get our immune system to work for us and not against us. My neuro likens copaxone to taking the bad cells down to the corner bar, getting them drunk and singing karaoke with them so they forget to do all the bad stuff they had planned. The experts aren't quite sure why copaxone works, but it does. It is made up of amino acids, all of which occur naturally in our body.
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