Cpap titration at home

Common Questions and Answers about Cpap titration at home

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I had O2 bled into my BiPAP when I was on that, it really helped me out. Do you have an oximeter at home? Some insurances cover it, I found that my oximeter was very useful in titrating my O2 (my doc gave me permission to do this). It might be worthwhile to look into it. Good luck with the stress test...let me know how it went.
I saw this device at a National Sleep Meeting in Baltimore a few years ago. It's one of many simple home sleep apnea screening devices. For diagnosis of sleep apnea, it's pretty reliable. The only problem is that it doesn't give you sleep stages, sleep position, limb movements, or differentiates between central and obstructive sleep apnea. Your score of 27 is in the moderate range for obstructive sleep apnea.
It's not unusual for a night in the lab to not be representative of normal at-home sleep, so treatment can need to be tweaked. Another common cause for failure of the cpap to make one feel better is mouth breathing by those who are not using a full face mask, as the intended treatment is leaked out of the mouth. Another problem can be using the ramp feature at a very low setting for a long ramp of maybe 45 minutes, and then restarting the ramp multiple times over the course of a night.
You can get a pulse oximeter just for peace of mind to use at home to check your O2 sats periodically. Some oximeters can record your O2 sats overnight but are much more costly. Actually, there still are only two types of sleep apnea: Central (origin is in brain) or obstructive (airway collapse blocks airflow). Hypopnea is NOT a type of sleep apnea. But hypopnea may be a reason for needing CPAP. Again, hypopnea is just the medical term for shallow breathing.
I had a home sleep study done and it came out that I had apnea and they ordered a CPAP titration. I also had some other bloodwork done and i was wondering if this could have anything to do with my symptoms and apnea. B12 --231 (reference range 211-911) Folic Acid --- 20.9 (says supposed to be below 5.4) I know that folic acid can mask B12 deficiency and was wondering if this could be my problem.
Previously in an untitrated sleep study, confirming OSA, my O2 levels dipped to a Nadir of 89% withOUT CPAP. With the latest sleep (titration) study in the lab though, my O2 was fine at 92% the lowest point with some mixed and central apneas. The sleep was horribly fragmented with the majority of time spent in Stages 1 and 2. No time in Stage 3 or 4. REM was minimal..
• With use of a CPAP or bilevel, they show a pattern of central apneas and hypopneas that meets the Centers for Medicare Services (CMS) definition of CSA Patients with CompSA may be seen as those who cannot tolerate conventional CPAP or bilevel therapy both during lab titration and at home. Neither CPAP nor bilevel therapy seems to alleviate their sleep disorders.
If you want to go with the assumption it is the garden variety obstructive sleep apnea, you could get a loaner data capable auto titrating cpap machine to use at home and the data would show what pressure would alleviate your episodes of reduced and/or stopped breathing. The machines are programmed that an episode has to meet certain criteria before it acknowledges them as events, so brief normal events are taken into consideration.
but I still feel there is something wrong. Another doctor had me do an at home sleep study to test for sleep apnea and has now ordered a CPAP titration because I guess he thinks I have it. The thing is, i dont have any of the risk factors for it. I am 26 years old, 5'9" and weigh 140 pounds. I'm worried that this "sleep apnea" could be caused by an enlarged thyroid or worse thyroid cancer. Has anyone else had a similar experience?
I started my bedtime pill last Thursday and didn't seem to have much of a problem with it other than by the time noon came around on Friday, the TN pain was back with a vengeance. So, I tried to add another dose of the Gabapentin yesterday at supper time. I feel asleep watching tv which is not normal for me but I slept about 1 1/2 hrs. I went to bed about an hour after the nap and I had no TN pain all evening. However, at about 4:00 a.m.
As for me, it is a CPAP/BiPAP titration sleep study Friday night. Why I scheduled this for a Friday night is beyond me. Other than that, it is just PT and going to work. Now I'll ask, "who's next"?
And sometimes it is so bad and I cough so hard I get nauseous and even vomit at times. At those times my throat ends up sore. I use cough meds and ibuprofen overnight, sometimes a codein med., and my throat heals, but the itch always comes back. For what it's worth, that's my story. Perhaps it has something to do with speaking, and the use of my vocal cords. That's the only thing that makes sense, and the itch sure feels like it's right there. Thanks for listening.
I have disconnected all of our cordless phones. Wondering about dish network. Willing to shut down all electricity to home at night to experiment. I am thinking that some sort of electrical wave is irritating or increasing the neurotoxins which then irritates the tissues and causes excitation?? If it is not in our home then the towers for cell phones in our area. Dr. Klinghardt has information in the area on the web and there is actually a shield you can buy that goes over your bed.
The first two nights I simply could not go back to sleep at all. My body wanted to go back to sleep, but, as I mentioned above, everytime I fell sleep the tremors woke me up. I'm on my 9th day and there seems to be no sign of letting up. I went to see my doctor on the fourth day--He prescribed Zolpidem, which I have been taken since.
Does this sound familiar to anyone? Oh, and this happens at all hours of the day and night, and usually, its not when I'm eating. Its frightening to wake up from a deep sleep choking like this. She suggested curbing any reflux I might be having, but I rarely ever have heartburn (but I'll try anything now!) I do note that it happens more often when my respiratory system is weakened by a cold, or allergy season, or even a little cough.
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