Seizure jamais vu

Common Questions and Answers about Seizure jamais vu

seizure

Avatar n tn The patient does not lose full consciousness but is dulled to her surroundings. She experiences sudden burst of fear and anger. It seems to me that she also has Jamais Vu. The attacks now last anywhere from 10-45 minutes on average. She was recently hospitalized again after an attack last over an hour. During her stay she underwent a Video EEG and during so she went thru a full blown attack. Unfortunately the results showed nothing wrong according to the EEG.
Avatar n tn Posted By Stuart on March 05, 1999 at 07:55:47: In Reply to: Re: Clarification of Epilepsy v other seizure-inducing disorders posted by CCF Neuro[P] MD, RPS on March 04, 1999 at 17:16:54: Dear Doctor The diagnosis of epilepsy and seizure disorder are not mutually exclusive. True seizure events are abnormal hypersynchronous firing of cortical neurons. These events are induced by extracellualr IPSPs or EPSPs. These firings would be detected on a brain wave test called EEG.
Avatar n tn Posted By CCF Neuro[P] MD, RPS on March 05, 1999 at 12:45:08: In Reply to: Clarification of Epilepsy v other seizure-inducing disorders posted by Stuart on March 05, 1999 at 07:55:47: : Dear Doctor The diagnosis of epilepsy and seizure disorder are not mutually exclusive. True seizure events are abnormal hypersynchronous firing of cortical neurons. These events are induced by extracellualr IPSPs or EPSPs. These firings would be detected on a brain wave test called EEG.
Avatar n tn Most often, this is a feeling of deja vu or jamais vu. There are some reports in the literature of depersonalization and derealization occurring in patients with epilepsy. To confirm whether or not these are seizures, an EEG (brain wave study) would need to be done during one of these episodes. However depersonalization and derealization are more often a symptom of . depression and anxiety. Again, this is not craziness, but rather the result of an imbalance in certain chemicals in the brain.
1318483 tn?1318350782 There is another interesting phenomenon, called jamais vu ("never seen", as opposed to "deja vu", which means "already seen"), in which something that is very familiar to a person suddenly seems totally unfamiliar.
Avatar n tn The symptoms that you describe (visual changes, Jamais-Vu and transient epileptic amnesia) can be seen in temporal lobe seizures or could be unrelated. You have mentioned a normal MRI and EEG years ago, but these do not rule out seizures. To get a better idea of the nature of the spells, would require catching one of these episodes while having the EEG. If this is not possible then getting a 2 hour sleep deprived EEG can also be helpful. Low sodium with trileptal is a common side effect.
1102927 tn?1268961271 They can present in forms of deja vu, hallucinations, jamais vu (unfamiliarity) mood swings and memory loss. Although my EEG was fine, and the neurologist now thinks it is psychiatric I have to be on a mood stabiliser that also acts as an anticonvulsant just to be on the safe side, as well as an antipsychotic. There is an interesting post on this on the neurology forum: http://www.medhelp.
Avatar n tn It usually lasts for 10-20 seconds, but it feels like forever inside my head. Sometimes, it's caused by an inability to find the correct words, sometimes it's caused by Jamais Vu, and sometimes I just don't know the cause. Is it a side effect of the medication or a result of letting my epilepsy go untreated for so long? Is it the fact that I have seizures in both my right frontal lobe and left temporal lobe? I don't the answers to this.
1830047 tn?1321671393 Do I tell the doc everything... (if he'd even hear me) 1. Sometimes suffer from what I've been told may be jamais vu... don't rec familar things/places. 2. Trouble understanding what is being said to me as if another language. 3. Can't understand what I'm trying to read (worse when lots of text but even a couple of sentences from time to time). 4.
Avatar f tn preserved consciousness sudden and inexplicable feelings of fear, anger, sadness, happiness or nausea sensations of falling or movement experiencing of unusual feelings or sensations altered sense of hearing, smelling, tasting, seeing, and tactile perception (sensory illusions and/or hallucinations), or feeling as though the environment is not real (derealization) or detachment from the environment (depersonalization) a sense of spatial distortion—things close by may appear to be at a distance
1830047 tn?1321671393 My whole ordeal started with what was either a seizure brought on by complicated migraine or a TA or who knows. Mayo termed episodes as possible jamais vu (first was the worst) possibly linked to lesion near area of brain resopnsible for recognition, etc. It's all just a big mess. Local neurologist doesn't want to waste his time (not a bad guy) b/c he simply doesn't know what it is. So, instead of listening to what is going on I have the impression he just says FM.
Avatar n tn Occasionally, I may experience 2 or 3 different types all in the same day. Sometimes, it will be a floating sensation, Jamais vu , (interpreting frequently encountered people, places or events as unfamiliar). Normal Associative deju-vu, interrupted memory, "experiential illusions" , A friend's voice may sound remote, or a well-known living room may appear unfamiliar, but the meaning is preserved, the voice does not become depersonalized, nor does the living room lose its identity.