Occupational therapy in acute stroke rehabilitation

Common Questions and Answers about Occupational therapy in acute stroke rehabilitation

stroke

Avatar f tn as the answer to your question I should say that most results of rehabilitation and improvements will be made in the first 6 months after stroke. but its not all of that. I had a patient who was injured after a surgery and was hemiplegic. when I was working with her I could see that she could open her fingers after 8 years! that was a good experience for me to never stop rehabilitation for brain injured patients. now you should continue rehabilitation and never get disappointed. good luck!
Avatar n tn Your husband's condition sounds similar to mine, when he was discharged from acute rehab unit of the hospital. We continued with physical, speech and occupational therapy home visits through a private agency. Are home visits for therapy an option for you? I found that though the scheduling was erratic for these home visits, it gave us both something to work from.
Avatar n tn Because of this I think getting him to do things on his own is even more difficult. My father is in a hospital bed, that has a electrical air mattress, in his home in the family room. They have a hoyer lift to assist in putting jim in a chair for a few hours each day, but he wears Depends and does not take part in his personal care. Can anyone recommend a book or web site that can help people that are this debilitated from their strokes?
Avatar n tn Hi, The swelling will begin to subside in 48-72 hours and will subside in a couple of weeks to a month. How-ever after a stroke, control signals from the brain often cannot reach some muscles, typically in the hand or foot. Without these signals, the level of electrical activity in these muscles is too low for them to contract adequately on their own. This causes them to become increasingly weaker.
Avatar n tn Hi, Stroke rehabilitation, or, in more optimistic terms, stroke recovery, is the process by which patients with disabling strokes undergo treatment to help them return to normal life as much as possible by regaining and relearning the skills of everyday living. For most stroke patients, the rehabilitation process includes nursing, occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), therapeutic recreation (TR) and speech therapy (or speech language therapy, SLP).
Avatar n tn From everything I've read, it sounds like with the blood clot still in his brain, he will probably have another stroke at some point. In all the research I've done, this is the one piece of info I can't find anything on: What happens to someone who's sent home with no rehab? Despite the fact that he doesn't recognize family members and can't communicate, is there still some part of his brain that would benefit from seeing his children and grandchildren?
Avatar n tn For most stroke patients, the rehabilitation process includes nursing, occupational therapy (OT), physical therapy (PT), therapeutic recreation (TR) and speech therapy (or speech language therapy, SLP). OT involves exercise and training to help the stroke patient relearn everyday activities, sometimes called the Activities of daily living (ADLs), such as eating and drinking, dressing, bathing, cooking, reading and writing, and toileting.
Avatar n tn The neurosurgeon did not offer much hope for us to survive the stroke nor in her recovery. She has already beat the odds. My mom was in ICU for 3 weeks and step-down 1 week and in rehab hospital for two months now. I have come to learn the dr.'s don't like or really now prognosis on recovery because everyone recovers differently. I have been told over and over again they don't know why some gain more function than others. My mom pulled out her breathing tube which she had for 2.
Avatar n tn they are usually 'sub-acute' facilities meaning they will probably provide less than 1 hour of therapy a day. my dad was placed in a sub acute/nursing facility only AFTER a 2-3 month period of being in an acute rehab center which provided 4 hours of therapy a day.
Avatar n tn my dad is out of ICU for two weeks now but aside from a brief two days last week of improved alertness and talking, he is back to sleeping all the time. As mentioned in other posts above, this impacts his ability to participate in physio and occupational therapy. I lifted his arms up and down 20 times just now as a start tonight; his eyes drifted open slightly from sleep to survey this disturbance. Any other ideas to help improve alertness? Hypnotic suggestions tapes to play?
Avatar n tn 00am til 4:00pm with a few breaks in between. He seems to be handling it OK. I think my mom expects to see miracles though. Yesterday was only his second day there and she expected to see him walk. He has barely stood in four months, so it is going to take some time. For about the firsw tow months after the stroke, my dad slept alot. They did put him in the wheelchair though and he would sleep in there. We did find that they were giving him vicodin twice a day at the time.
Avatar n tn I am now home, walking with the aid of a walker and receiving in home physical and occupational therapy. My concentration level is bad, I cannot walk without the walker, I have a shower chair and a grab bar. I get very exhausted easily, even by getting dressed or bathing, or even trying to fill my pill caddy for the week. I have fallen a few times since being home. A recent MRI stilled so normal, so I am lost as to what is wrong with me.
Avatar n tn The second they think was caused when they lowered his blood pressure it was a Ischemic stroke. The first stroke is the most severe and originated in the Putamen ( a part of the basal ganglia). The second is on the right side and I've been told it controls spatial concepts. He has started to move more today and instead of only having posturing movements he has started to bring his arms up in a more normal response.
Avatar n tn One more thing, patients need lots of rest after a stroke...they need therapy too, but rest is very important and they are very tired after the stroke..the brain heals while they are sleeping and the swelling goes down, so don't worry if he sleeps a lot..that is normal after such a serious stroke.
Avatar n tn i would like to know what kind of rehabilitation is needed and can u refer me few books in developmental therapy which will be useful for her.
Avatar n tn First, I would want that done. He was moved to an acute rehab in Boston where he received intense therapy 3 hrs each day. Two days ago he passed his swallowing test and is now on pureed food which he can each with his left hand under constant supervision of the speech/swallow therapist while he eats. She is working on his speech, which has proven very difficult as he is very confused and doesn't understand much of our conversation.
Avatar n tn My father had by-pass surgery at Ohio State University Hospital June 4th which resulted in a severe stroke and then pneumonia. The stroke resulted in paralyzing his right side and left him unable to speak or swallow. He also has aphasia and apraxia. After spending time in Intensiva and the Columbus Rehabilitation and Sub-Acute Institute, he was sent home several weeks ago. He is now able to eat and move himself in a wheelchair with his left foot.
Avatar n tn My father had by-pass surgery at Ohio State University Hospital June 4th which resulted in a severe stroke and then pneumonia. The stroke resulted in paralyzing his right side and left him unable to speak or swallow. He also has aphasia and apraxia. After spending time in Intensiva and the Columbus Rehabilitation and Sub-Acute Institute, he was sent home several weeks ago. He is now able to eat and move himself in a wheelchair with his left foot.
Avatar n tn FAST HEARTRATE HEADACHES NAUSEA JAW TIGHTNESS/ACHINESS ACHES IN BACK/CHEST/SHOULDER (LEFT AND RIGHT SIDE) TINGLING IN FACE/EYES TINGLING IN ARMS/LEGS CHILLS TREMBLING FEELING LIKE I'M ABOUT TO DIE RESTLESSNESS Normal tests: EKG ECHOCARDIOGRAM HOLTER MONITOR - 2 WEEKS STRESS ECHOCARDIOGRAM BLOOD WORK MRI CT SCAN CHEST XRAYS
Avatar n tn Driving was worse as I would feel like I was going to pass out and my eyes couldn't focus on the road but kept darting to the left. I went in as they thought I was having a stroke. EKG and MRI showed no problems. All my blood work and pressure are normal. I then went to a EN&T and he checked my hearing and said I had slight hearing lose which I knew of since being in the military never was a problem before.