Narcolepsy symptoms sleep paralysis

Common Questions and Answers about Narcolepsy symptoms sleep paralysis

narcolepsy

Avatar m tn The symptoms you are experiencing could be due to an entity called sleep paralysis. When this happens in sleep the person has difficulty moving his hands or feet. This is the symptom of a sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. This sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior.
1745492 tn?1320198340 Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior. Narcolepsy is diagnosed by the sleep onset REM episodes (SOREMs), wherein the person goes into the dream phase or REM cycle soon after sleep onset. This is evident in the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). It can however be regulated with medications.
Avatar f tn My issues have waxed and waned over the years although I am happy to report no more sleep paralysis.. Sleep paralysis is associated with narcolepsy to some degree. I feel it can often be brought about by stress/panic. Try sleeping on your stomach instead, this may resolve your sleep paralysis completely. Personally, I didn't like the things I saw or felt, so I would wake myself up as fast as possible... God bless.
Avatar m tn Yes, narcolepsy can result in disturbed nighttime sleep. Narcolepsy can only be diagnosed with a multiple sleep latency test during the day (usually preceded by an all night sleep study). Dr.
Avatar m tn Hi, suffered sleep paralysis for decades now. No voices etc, just paralysis. WHY doesn't the medical world take an interest in this phenomena, which is more common than I think is believed? It is left to the realm of cultural myths, alien abduction theories, generalized medical mumbling about anxiety - the definition of anything they do not understand or think will get them into trouble by not investigating.
Avatar m tn The symptoms you are experiencing could be due to an entity called sleep paralysis. When this happens in sleep the person has difficulty moving his hands or feet. This is the symptom of a sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. This sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior.
Avatar f tn It does sound like narcolepsy to me but it could be any of the sleep cycle disorders really. Sleep paralysis is a very common feature of narcolepsy. How old are you? I was convinced I had narcolepsy when I went but I ended up having periodic limb movement disorder. It's where you kick your legs and move your arms all night long. Every time I would get into REM, I would kick my legs or move my arms and it would jerk me out of it. That's what caused me to remember my dreams vividly.
Avatar f tn I was reading up about it and this lead me to read about Narcolepsy as Cataplexy is a unique symptom to this condition. I read about the symptoms and I am now afraid that I may be suffering from it. I have very vivid and sometimes lucid dreams and I wake up almost every hour of the night for short spans of time. Sometimes I cannot tell my dreams from reality and I often hear noises and see things during the night that aren't really there.
Avatar n tn Hi, narcolepsy and sleepwalking are different sleep disorders. Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnagogic hallucinations and automatic behavior. It can however be regulated with medications. So, ensure to take them regularly and follow up with your doctor. Regards.
573569 tn?1278629655 There are other similar conditions that dont involve paralysis and are more experienced as a difficulty to become fully awake, where as sleep paralysis you are unable to move and think your awake, commonly waking up with high anxiety, which makes one feel alert. Sleep paralysis can also give feelings of impending doom. None the less you are not alone, both are fairly common.
Avatar m tn Hi, welcome to the forum, sleep paralysis can be a manifestation of type of sleep disorder like parasomnias. Few of the individuals are known to suffer from parasomnias esp. when they are on non-benzodiazepine sedatives, drug abuse etc. otherwise no definitive cause exists in few individuals apart from stress, positive past history of abuse etc. The associated symptoms with the following disorder are confusional wakefulness, sleep paralysis, nightmares and night terrors.
Avatar m tn i do have narcolepsy and the reason i add this is because i know this in itself has a lot of symptoms ie cataplexy sleep paralysis.
Avatar f tn Sleep paralysis is the inability to move or talk at the beginning or end of sleep. Microsleep: Microsleeps are very brief sleep episodes during which people with narcolepsy continue to function (talk, put things away, etc.), and then awaken with no memory of the activities. Nighttime wakefulness: People with narcolepsy may have periods of wakefulness at night, with hot flashes, elevated heart rate, and sometimes intense alertness.
Avatar f tn ve experienced sleep paralysis many times ever since I started college but have never had any symptoms of further sleep problems or narcolepsy. It turns out, after doing pretty extensive research, that sleep paralysis can happen alone without being brought on by a sleep disorder. It can be brought on by stress, an off-balance sleep schedule or lack of sleep, and other things which can throw off your sleep cycle.
Avatar n tn This is the symptom of a sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. This sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior. You will need to consult your primary care physician, who may schedule you for a polysomnogram (sleep test) to rule out sleep disorders and initiate appropriate therapy. Best regards.
Avatar f tn I also don’t have any sleep paralysis or cataplexy symptoms that I know are common with narcoleptics too. I’m wanting opinions from those experienced with narcolepsy and am hoping you can give me valuable help to determine if I should do anything about these issues. Thank you very much in advance!
Avatar n tn what makes sleep paralysis happen? what can i do to reduce the risk of suffering sleep paralysis? what medication is avalible for this disorder? how effective is it? how does it help? i would be very gratefull to hear off you.
Avatar m tn Narcolepsy is a serious neurological disorder involving excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (loss of muscle tone with emotions such as laughter), sleep paralysis and hypnogogic hallucinations. Although narcolepsy affects 1 in every 2,000 people worldwide, it's often misdiagnosed or goes undiagnosed for 3 to 15 years. When will health professionals WAKE UP to the REAL narcolepsy?
871962 tn?1244730028 Think about adding medications, treatments and other issues relating to narcolepsy and hypersomnias to your sleep tracker. Insomnia and sleep apnea may be common sleep disorders, but not the only ones.
Avatar m tn Classical narcolepsy constitutes of Hypnagogic hallucinations, Sleep paralysis and Cataplexy (emotionally triggered muscle paralysis resulting in partial or complete collapse). You need to undergo tests like Polysomnography, Multiple Sleep Latency Test and CSF levels of Orexin/Hypocretin which help to substantiate the diagnosis. Having regular nap for about 20 min during day will help to prevent sleep attacks.
Avatar m tn What you are experiencing could be hallucinations and delusions and they can occur with certain medications, stress, sleep deprivation, in certain brain disorders and with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. When sleep paralysis happens in sleep the person has difficulty moving his hands or feet. This is the symptom of a sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. You will need to consult your primary care physician for assessment. Hope this helped and do keep us posted.
12594947 tn?1426138835 re inquiring about meds to treat insomnia, early awakening, night terrors, sleep paralysis/hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, or what? Also, alcohol has no therapeutic use in sleep medicine. In fact, sleep specialists recommend that people wish sleep disorders minimize their alcohol intake, and never drink before bedtime as that can cause a disordered type of sleep (even if it subjectively seems like it's "helping" you sleep).
Avatar f tn The symptoms you are experiencing could be due to an entity called sleep paralysis. When this happens in sleep the person has difficulty moving his hands or feet. This is the symptom of a sleep disorder called Narcolepsy. This sleep disorder is characterized by excessive day time sleepiness, sleep paralysis, cataplexy where the person has episodes of loss of muscle function while awake, hypnogogic hallucinations and automatic behavior.
488264 tn?1226520307 Information on sleep paralysis can be found on slep disorder websites such as talk about sleep. I have Narcolepsy and SP is a common factor that I deal with. Sleep Paralysis happens when the brain is kinda disconnected in the order of sleep. Our brain is awake but it puts our body in dream sleep and paralyzes us- once the brain copes with the dysfunction and recconects the proper wires the SP dissapates.
Avatar f tn sixty to eighty percent of people with narcolepsy suffer from cataplexy. It can be triggered by surprise, fear, anger, or laughter. The effects include slight feelings of weakness and sagging facial muscles, head nodding, buckling knees, loss of arm strength, and mumbling or "garbled" speech. But it may also lead to immediate total body collapse ... these attacks may last from a few seconds to half an hour or so. There is no loss of consciousness.
Avatar m tn If you are paralyzed as you fall asleep, this could be a sign of Narcolepsy. Narcoleptics go into REM sleep very soon after falling alseep. A sleep study can prove this. As far as the blood rush - eveyone has slightly different manifestations of sleep paralysis. If you experience fear during the event, your body is going to release adrenaline which raises the heart rate and gets the blood flowing through the body. Hence, the rushing feeling in the brain.