Multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria

Common Questions and Answers about Multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria

multiple-sclerosis

382218 tn?1341181487 is a bandlike sensation around the trunk that occurs due to myelopathy, and may be a feature of NMO. Optic neuritis and cervical myelopathy are part of the diagnostic criteria for NMO, meaning that they must be present in order for the diagnosis to be made. Supportive criteria, meaning criteria that further help in establishing the diagnosis, include myelopathy involving a specific length of the spinal cord, an MRI that does NOT meet criteria for MS, and positive NMO-IgG antibodies.
667078 tn?1316000935 February 12, 2010 — Investigators are proposing new diagnostic standards for multiple sclerosis in clinically isolated syndromes. Their criteria are less stringent than other proposals and are designed to improve sensitivity to promote early diagnosis. etc. New medscape article. The Neurology community is realizing they are taking too long to diagnose and start treatment. Small miracle.
900662 tn?1469390305 ACTIVITY GOAL The goal of this CME/CE activity is to examine the pathophysiology, etiologic factors, classification, diagnostic criteria, and current and emerging strategies for treating and managing patients with multiple sclerosis.
Avatar f tn of lesions, their location and size, an diagnostic criteria for MS. there should be a clinical history of previous attacks, CSF examination and MRI findings should substantiate. The other possible conditions mimicking these changes are microvascular ischemic brain changes in hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol. Certain infective and inflammatory conditions can also account for these changes. Migraine headaches can also have white matter changes on MR.
Avatar f tn s considered a secondary symptom, not one to be considered to meet the diagnostic criteria (as, for instance, optic neuritis, trouble walking, etc. would be). Thanks for any insights.
Avatar f tn Hi Ams, You happened upon a Multiple Sclerosis patient-to-patient forum. I encourage you to speak to your doctor for what you are experiencing.
Avatar n tn Certain diagnostic criteria and radiological criteria need to be fulfilled. These while lesions represent micro vascular ischemic changes in the brain. So these changes are seen in people with micro vascular or macro vascular risk factors like history of hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol etc. these could also mean infectious or inflammatory conditions. Hope this helps. Take care.
Avatar f tn The majority of these lesions quite likely reflect gliosis and the distribution is certainly consistent with multiple sclerosis. No mass effect or midline shift is identified. No signal abnormality is identified within the posterior fossa Following contrast infusion, no pathologic enhancement is identified. Expected flow signal is present in the major arterial vasculature at the skull base and within the dural venous sinuses. Limited opacification of the left mastoid air cells is identified.
Avatar m tn Certain diagnostic criteria and radiological criteria need to be fulfilled. These while lesions represent micro vascular ischemic changes in the brain. So these changes are seen in people with micro vascular or macro vascular risk factors like history of hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol etc. these could also mean infectious or inflammatory conditions. the black holes are the normal anatomy of brain viz. sulci and gyri. Sulci are a depression on the brain surface and surround the gyri.
Avatar f tn Over the years the MS diagnostic criteria has been tweaked multiple times to make MS easier to dx much earlier but neurologist MS experience can still impact the outcome. "“Evidence of damage “disseminated in space,” or found on two or more parts of the CNS” – and so far I only had the optic neuritis as a symptom?
Avatar f tn Quix-or anyone else who may be reading medical journals...I just finished reading about a newer criteria being proposed for interpreting MRI results(proposed in 2006) in regards to fulfilling dissemination in space(DIS) requirement for diagnosis following occurance of CIS. The Swanton require "at least 1 T2 lesion in at least two of four locations defined as characteristic of MS: periventricular, juxtacortical, infratentorial and spinal cord" in order to demonstrate DIS.
1203462 tn?1265578294 Findings of demyelinating lesions in the infra and supratentorial lesion, oligoclonal bands in the CSF, and abnormal VEP are all findings that can occur in MS, and are part of the diagnostic criteria (the criteria physicians use to make a diagnosis) but in order to make this diagnosis, a detailed history and neurologic examination is required.
1225331 tn?1333365769 //www.medhelp.org/health_pages/Multiple-Sclerosis/How-Can-a-Person-with-MS-Have-a-Negative-MRI/show/161?cid=36 and http://www.medhelp.org/health_pages/Multiple-Sclerosis/How-MRIs-Show-Lesions-in-MS/show/23?
1225331 tn?1333365769 //www.medhelp.org/posts/Multiple-Sclerosis/MS-Diagnostic-criteria---and-o-bands/show/2106154 I hope this helps - it can be incredibly confusing to understand all the possibilities.
402504 tn?1241996524 I recieved paper work from my insurance company today about requested procedures. The title that reflects the doc's reason for needing procedures was "Suspected Multiple Sclerosis". Then came the list of denials. The head MRI was approved, but the MRA was denied because it didn't fit the diagnosis (what?). Thoracic and spinal MRI's are denied until a head MRI is suggestive of MS but not firmly diagnostic.
Avatar f tn I have one lesion on MRI, in my corpus callosum. It was non-enhancing and the note was "could be demyelinating lesion, MS lesion". But, MS is multiple sclerosis AKA multiple plaques. Therefore, I have only one lesion, which does not meet diagnostic criteria for MS.