Kneecap cartilage damage

Common Questions and Answers about Kneecap cartilage damage

knee

Avatar m tn The cartilage under your kneecap (patella) is a natural shock absorber. But it doesn't come with a lifetime guarantee. Overuse, injury or other factors may lead to a condition known as chondromalacia patella — a general term indicating damage to the cartilage under your kneecap. A more accurate term for chondromalacia patella is patellofemoral pain.
Avatar f tn The patella is the medical term for kneecap in layman's terms. Cartilage irregularity can be due to trauma, degenerative changes (wear and tear), and/or lack of movement. Please see your PCP +/- ortho consult.
1179669 tn?1302404377 Dislocation, clinically referred to as luxation, can occur on either the medial, or inside surface, or the lateral, or outside surface, of the knee. This abnormal displacement of the kneecap results in pain, cartilage damage, and arthritis. There are varying degrees of severity of this disease. Surgery may be needed, but not necessary. To learn more: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?
Avatar n tn Sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted images were obtained in addition to coronal T2 with fat saturation and sagittal and axial proton density with fat saturation sequences. Comparison: Right knee radiograph of 2/24/17. There is a small right knee joint effusion. No Baker's cyst. There is no acute fracture, osseous contusion, or focal osteochondral lesion. No bone marrow signal abnormality.
Avatar n tn Also, you can try to push the kneecap towards the interior of your legs a bit. Realigning the kneecap helps with the "popping" feeling.
Avatar n tn this condition often affects young, otherwise healthy athletes. Chondromalacia is due to an irritation of the undersurface of the kneecap. In some individuals, the kneecap tends to rub against one side of the knee joint, and the cartilage surface become irritated, and knee pain is the result. Allowing the inflammation of chondromalacia to settle is the first step of treatment.
Avatar m tn This abnormal displacement of the kneecap results in pain, cartilage damage, and arthritis. There are varying degrees of severity of this disease. Surgery may be needed, but not necessary. To learn more: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&A=2448 it might not be this cause you haven't said anything about going back to normal.
Avatar f tn Both my knees click, you can feel grinding when touching the kneecap, and the pain is usually under the kneecap on the inside of the knee. The pain is worse while bending the knee joint. Keeping it straight helps, but does not stop the pain. I've had x-rays and ct scans, revealing that my cartilage is fine, and my tendons are fine. Next step is an MRI. So what could be causing this long term cronic pain? Inflammation is common, and the area gets hot. My hips also suffer.
Avatar n tn The major problem is osteoarthritis of the knee joint where there are changes in the smooth cartilage or through damage to the ligaments. This can be caused by an injured or torn knee ligament, such as a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee. The condition can be treated either by wearing a knee brace or surgery. Trauma, or a sudden turn or twist to the knee can cause a ligament to give out. Go for an MRI and follow up with your orthopedician. Take care!
1069378 tn?1255215132 The most common form of arthritis is caused by the breakdown of cartilage in one or more joints. Cartilage acts as a cushion between the bones of joints. When there is cartilage loss, a joint can become bone-on-bone, which is very painful for the patient. Treatment options for osteoarthritis focus on pain relief and restoring function to the affected joint. Physical treatments should be attempted wherever possible like weight reduction, exercise, supports, heat and rest.
Avatar m tn Hello, Without examination,confirming a diagnosis is tough but the various possibilities for your symptoms are tendonitis (an inflammation of the tendon) , ligament injury,arthritis(rheumatoid,osteoarthritis,psoritic,gout or reactive arthritis) , chondomalacia(softening of the cartilage under the kneecap (patella) , osteomalacia(deficiency of vit D in adults) and bursitis.
Avatar f tn The scan showed no cartilage damage and no real mcl damage which was suspected. Ive recieved some physio since and the pain subsided in those areas but i have been left with chronic pain above my knee in my quadricep area above my kneecap. The muscle is completely bulged with my leg straightened and is proving very painful to walk on and is also painful at rest too with a warm feeling in it but not to the touch.
Avatar f tn Dislocation, clinically referred to as luxation, can occur on either the medial, or inside surface, or the lateral, or outside surface, of the knee. This abnormal displacement of the kneecap results in pain, cartilage damage, and arthritis. There are varying degrees of severity of this disease. Surgery may be needed, but not necessary. To learn more: http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?
Avatar m tn Hello! There are 3 pairs of ligaments in your knee joint and you might have injured your menisci or cruciate ligaments. Grade I ligament tears take time to heal and you have to wear a brace for 4-6 weeks and follow up with physiotherapy. For a proper diagnosis you have to consider MRI and also a proper clinical examination near an orthopedician for diagnosis and for a proper recovery. Take care!
Avatar f tn I had knee arthroscopy 6 weeks ago to smooth the cartilage on the back of the patella, remove scar tissue, and correct a structural defect in a groove at the bottom of the femur that helps the kneecap track properly (needed to widen it). I had a lot of swelling over the first 4 weeks. This has finally subsided for the most part but I am struggling to get the full flexion back. I am still only at 105 degrees despite physio, biking, and the elliptical trainer.
Avatar f tn It turned out I just had some pitting type damage to the cushioning cartilage on the bone, but it hurt and popped for a long time after.
Avatar f tn Patients usually feel pretty good and think they can avoid these critically important steps, and even start running and jumping before the internal aspects of the knee, and the joint surface are ready.Healing also depends on the severity of the cartilage damage and any other conditions existing in the knee.You need not worry and follow up ypur doctor regularly.
Avatar m tn Once, two years ago, was a quick dislocation of the kneecap - out and immediately back in - with some bruising of the bones. Last year I stretched an attachment of my MCL (?). My knee still hurts almost constantly. The pain moves around and is mainly around the medial, anterior, and lateral portions of the knee as well as directly on the kneecap. Every so often while walking I experience sharp and intense, but very short-lived bursts of pain on the lateral side of my knee.
Avatar f tn t hit it on anything. I looked at it and it is a bit swollen on top of the kneecap. It is red on the top and a couple spots around the kneecap. Also it seems there may be a pocket of fluid on top of the kneecap. It is also warm to the touch. Does any one know what this could be?
Avatar m tn ve heard horror stories that the sort of thing I could have might lead to permanent nerve damage. Does this case sound like a plausible nerve damage case, should I go see a doctor, or is it just a torn muscle? Is there anything I should be avoiding - is cracking my right knee joint by shaking it fine? I'm in my mid-teens if that helps.
Avatar f tn Although you have put the kneecap back in place, there may be residual damage, such as edema or disruption of medial patellofemoral ligament, subchondral marrow contusions in medial patella and lateral femoral condyle, and/or chondral injury to the patella. If your symptoms, consider MRI knee without contrast.
1524655 tn?1291420532 After seeing an orthopedic surgeon and getting an MRI, I was diagnosed with articular cartilage damage (Grade 2, bordering Grade 3). According to the surgeon, the damage was not all the way to the bone and is located underneath the knee cap. He said that I do not need surgery and just need to wait for it to go away. It's been two months since the injury. The pain has gotten less indeed.
Avatar f tn Im assuming its loose bodies/cartilage but im not sure if you can have those by the surface of your skin above the kneecap? What do you think this is and should I see a doctor for treatment? I hope this makes sense!
Avatar f tn Problems with the patellofemoral articulation, the joint between the kneecap and the thigh, frequently present with pain going up and down stairs, and craqcking and popping in the knee. The cause is usually a combination of malalignment of the patellofemoral joint, quadriceps weakness or imbalance, and wear of the cartilage behind the kneecap.