Colon cancer genetic testing

Common Questions and Answers about Colon cancer genetic testing

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Avatar f tn Early detection is very important in colon cancer, and despite what anyone tells you, it is not necessarily an indication of poor diet. Some people have a genetic predisposition to colon cancer. Be sure your doctor knows about your family history and get tested. It can save your life.
Avatar f tn Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) is the most common form of genetic predisposition to colon cancer. Patients who have the gene for this syndrome have a lifetime risk for developing colon cancer of around 80%.
Avatar f tn My husband has just been diagnosed with Colon cancer on Wednesday, his surgeon wanted to admit him right away but stated he needed more testing before surgery. Is having a chest xray and CT scan normal testing before the surgery or should I prepare for news that the cancer has spread. I need to know because I don't want to be too upset when we meet the surgeon again this Wednesday. Any help I would greatly appreciate. Thank you in advance.
Avatar m tn previous history of breast cancer, a mass with atypical hyperplasia on biopsy, strong family history or genetic predisposition (e.g. BRCA 1 and 2 genes), prior radiotherapy to the chest, or a five-year risk of invasive breast cancer of at least 1.7% in women 35 years or older, using the modified Gail model for calculating risk (see http://www.cancer.gov/bcrisktool/Default.aspx). There is no blood test available at present which can be reliably used for breast cancer screening.
Avatar f tn Lynch syndrome is a genetic condition that predisposes people to colon cancer and other cancers as well. While most people have about a six percent chance of developing colon cancer at some point in their lives, people with Lynch syndrome have about an 80 percent chance. Women with Lynch syndrome also have about a 10 percent chance of developing ovarian cancer and a 50 percent chance of developing uterine cancer. I think of you all often. As always my thoughts and prayers are with you.
Avatar n tn Knowing if there is a single cause to your diagnoses may help guide your cancer screening and provide you with information about risks for your family members. Genetic testing is available for many hereditary cancer syndromes and you can talk with a genetic counselor about the benefits and limitations of those tests. DNA Direct offers genetic consultation with board-certified genetic counselors over the telephone and offers genetic testing when medically indicated as well.
Avatar f tn Hi, The diagnosis of colon cancer in a relative at a young age does raise the possibility of a hereditary cancer, and colon cancer has some known families with specific patterns. It is estimated that the cancer may have developed over a ten year interval, which is the rationale for the suggestion of a screening test ten years before the age of the known cancer case. Screening may indeed be reasonable for you at your age.
Avatar f tn A cancer genetic counselor can review the benefits and limitations of genetic testing for BRCA1/2 mutations. You can find a cancer genetic counselor at the National Society of Genetic Counselors website or through companies like mine, AccessDNA.
Avatar f tn What are the benefits vs. downfall to genetic testing. Three of the six sisters in my family have breast cancer. One just passed away. The other two were both diagnosed with stage I. The clinics do not seem interested in testing you unless you are positive for the cancer. The one sister with cancer wants her ovaries removed-but the surgeon won't remove them without genetic testing. This does not make sense because cancer is cancer. Why let the ugly disease spread?
531852 tn?1226026411 How do you guys feel about genetic testing. As mentioned in my earlier post my mother Lorraine is in her final stages of her stage 3C ovarian cancer. I have 2 sisters and this was brought up only once by the doctors. Doctors did not recommend it. I do have my family doctor and she sends me for a mamogramme, internal echography and CA125 tests every year. They did discover a fibrome in the last test but she told me it was nothing to worry about.
394052 tn?1203100849 My family has a strong history of cancer. Grandmother with breast cancer at 94, mother with colon cancer at age 73, uncle lung cancer, uncle stomach cancer, aunt with colon cancer, great aunt leukemia. These are all on maternal side. Brother now with prostate cancer at age 55 and me with stage 1b clear cell ovarian cancer at age 55 (no sign of disease now). I realize with older people and cancer, the docs have always told me, well they were just old enough.
Avatar n tn Genetic testing is a valuable tool in some cases. I'm not sure about your particular circumstances. You of course already know that you have a higher risk with your family history. If you have daughters and your test were positive then they would need to be followed much more closely and earlier than usual. Your mother was probably positive for the gene .... since your sister also had BC. I think the benefit would be more for your daughters at this point.
675718 tn?1530033033 It may seem silly but when I fill out any paperwork for the doctor (or visiting my current doctor) I always let them know about the cancers in my family. Since skin cancer, lung cancer, kidney cancer, colon cancer and many other cancers run in my family, I let my doctor know about it, even if it was a "good" cancer. I was diagnosed with skin cancer in the past year and have had other tests to check for cancer.
Avatar f tn This test will show an increased risk for Ovarian, Breast and Colon cancer, if someone carries the gene. The increase risk if testing positive for BRCA I and II is about 40 percent, higher than that for Breast Cancer. There would have to be a history of cancer (breast, ovarian and colon) in your family before a doctor would consider testing you.
Avatar f tn Her chemo will start in ten days and radiation to follow. She also had the genetic testing done a few weeks back. The results were given to us Thursday. Does that change her grade and or stage? Will her chemo treatment change? I know she will be having another mastectomy and ovaries removed later. I also would like to know if my other 2 daughters and myself should be tested. If there is anyone with a similar situation, please respond. Thanks, A very concerned Mama in Georgia.
Avatar f tn My mother had uterine cancer at 57, aunt died at 47 with ovarian cancer and my grandmother died of ovarian cancer at 80, my father died of colon cancer at 67.. I am very concerned this is not good, any suggestion on any other tests I should get or that this is cancer?
Avatar f tn My aunt was just diagnosed with colon cancer at the age of 27 this past december and my Mom also just found out she had colon polyps. I have had abdominal cramping for the past 3 weeks or so. I have had diarrhea alternating with I guess what you would call constipation(it would be hard to go but the stools would be soft). Actually at times it would be hard at first for the diarrhea to come out... sounds weird I know. When I have formed stools they are small, skinny and elongated.
Avatar f tn HI, it is called hemochromatosis, and he as well has had polyps on colon, his dad who dies of congestive heart failure and likely had hemochromatosis now we know what it is, and it is genetic so he got it from one or both or his parents, his dad had all the signs and symptoms, but no one knew, and he was Irish...he also had colon cancer and HIS dad died of colon cancer. Colon cancer and others high in people with iron overload.
Avatar f tn In the period of 10 years, my oldest sister, my father and one brother were diagnosed with non-hodgkins lymphoma, I got breast cancer and my youngest brother got colon cancer. The other 2 brothers and 1 sister are certainly nervous as are our children. All we can do is get the regular physical checks and live our lives to the fullest. We nearly lost by brother and sister several times but the new medical advances have helped them far beyond their original diagnosis.
Avatar n tn My mother's family has lynch syndrome and it has mainly affected her aunts. Some have died as young as 38 from colon cancer! My grandma is 64 now and she hasn't had any cancers. Does this mean she most likely didn't get the gene for this syndrome?
Avatar m tn Do to my age it was advised by the GI Dr. to have genetic testing done. Could having a DX of Pre-cancer of the colon be an increased risk that my bilateral cysts can be cancer?
Avatar n tn Some of these genes (named BRCA1 and BRCA2) also increase the risk of breast cancer - so having a family member with breast cancer can increase your risk of ovarian cancer. Another set of genes increase the risk of colon cancer, so women who have colon cancer in their families may have a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer. Many cases of familial epithelial ovarian cancer are caused by inherited gene mutations that can be identified by genetic testing.
Avatar f tn Iron-Rich Foods, Iron-Related Genes and Colon Cancer (Colorectal Cancer). Iron-rich red meat - beef, pork, lamb - can increase the risk of colon/colorectal cancer. Cancerous cells are iron-overloaded (iron-rich, iron-saturated) cells. Primary tumors always develop at body sites of excessive iron deposits. Some might expect that since the vegan diet contains a form of iron that is not that well absorbed, vegans might be prone to developing iron-deficiency anemia.