What is coreg taken for

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coreg

I had a recent MUGA Scan and discovered my heart had continued to improve and has healed. My EF is not 59. (Coreg is a miracle drug in my opinion.) My question is....now that my heart has healed, should I continue to remain taking the Coreg that I have taken for 13 years? Would it be better to stop now? I do continue to have high blood pressure and take Diovan and a diuretic, Spironolactone, in addtion to the Coreg. Again, my main question is...Should I continue with Coreg?
He is 84 years old and I am just wondering if at this point what he is going through if it is worth his pain and suferring. Today because of the increased weakness he has fell twice and hit his head, he refuses to use a walker. Up until he started taken this medication he was able to at least go out to places. Now he has no strength to do anything but lay in bed. And when he does attempt to get up and go into the living room, he falls. Any advice...
I will have to see if I can sustain this combination for a while. May be there is an optimum dose of coreg for each person depending on his physical condition and the drug becomes most effective at this dose. You can try increasing gradually with your doctors advice and see if you get the desired results. Wish you good luck.
So, I can tell you that the likelihood that Coreg is energy draining and Lisinopril is probably not, is high. This is just from my experience. You can beat this cardiomyopathy for sure! It happens all of the time.
COREG posted by Clarence on January 31, 1999 at 16:43:45: My Father has been taking Coreg for about two weeks now and he seems to be getting worse. He has always had heart problems, enlarged heart, open heart surgery, congested heart failure, and presently wears a pacemaker. He is 84 years old and I am just wondering if at this point what he is going through if it is worth his pain and suferring.
I have called around and there is still no generic yet. I just started coreg after being on Toprol XL for 6.5 yrs. Do you have any side effects from the coreg. I am so tired all the time and I have gained weight despite no real change in my diet. I understand your point, I take pills in botrh the am and pm. What else do you take?
Hello, In January I am to be taken off Coreg because my EF is 52% and hearts size and function is normal as of July of 98. I was told to have PPCM my EF starting at 30% Dec 97. Does one need to be weened off Coreg? What should I expect from going off the medication? I've been on Coreg since Dec 97 I am just concerned about what I may experiemce like side effects. I will be given a MUGA a couple of months after being off the medication to make sure my heart is holding up.
Hello, In January I am to be taken off Coreg because my EF is 52% and hearts size and function is normal as of July of 98. I was told to have PPCM my EF starting at 30% Dec 97. Does one need to be weened off Coreg? What should I expect from going off the medication? I've been on Coreg since Dec 97 I am just concerned about what I may experiemce like side effects. I will be given a MUGA a couple of months after being off the medication to make sure my heart is holding up.
How effective is Coreg in strengthening the heart muscle after the development of an enlarged heart? Will it actually reduce the size of the heart muscle? Currently I am taking Cozaar, Coumadin, Demadex, and Dygoxin.
He does take 12.5 mg of Coreg twice a day. Diuretics do not seem to be helping too much. What is the best and fastest way to lose the water?
If you have this diagnosis, it would be dangerous not to be on a beta blocker which is what Coreg is. Coreg is really the best beta blocker and blocks the most receptors. Now that you are on Coreg, you should try not to worry too much. Just do not miss a dose or go off of it suddenly. Follow-up with your doctor. If you experience flutter with the Coreg, make sure to see your doctor.
If needed while waiting for the new heart, there is a heart pump that can be put in to pump the heart when the muscle is too weak. Watch for any signs of nose, ear, lips, feet, or hands turning blue. This would indicate that the heart is not pumping blood through the body and to the organs as needed. If there are any signs of blue, he should be taken to the emergency room. Not to alarm you (just to make you aware). The medications are important and can really help.
Apart from mention about moderate consumption of alcohol as stimulant for the heart,I am yet to find someone who is practising it with success.As for me I am an Anterior wall MI patient since last October.Following the heart attack I am also on medications.My EF was just 26% at the time of discharge from the hospital.It is time someone here enlightening us on the notion of alcohol and its benefit on heart disease.
With the ICD inplace helping him pace his heart ( he is in AFIB most of the time) and with it being there to zap him if it gets out of control, what is the life expectancy. What other issues from his weak heart will not be helped? Does the ICD work every time? Can the extremely bad heart still fail with it in? Is there a risk of it just stopping? I read in one of the forums about the pump just stopping. Are we looking at years yet for him to be around.
I would think that if you had it measured again by an echocardiogram or angiogram it would be higher. A normal EF for our age is around 50%-65%. In the US, one prerequisite for social security disability income is an EF of <30%. So sorry to give you bad news, but like I say it can improve over time, if you receive the proper medical treatment. I am not familiar with blood glucose measured in parts per billion (ppb). In the US we use the decimal: milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).
Most of what I have read seems to indicate that Coreg is used for congestive heart failure or high blood pressure. I do not have high blood pressure, and I did not think I was in CHF. I would like to find out how widespread the use of this drug is for patients with aortic valve problems. It appears from the MD's answer above, that the Cleveland Clinic doctors are not using it. I wonder why?
I said well I took a 1/4 of a 25mg zoloft and it knocked me out for 2andhalf hours. But that is what her suggestion is. Give it a month and then call if I decide to do a beta. I also said so why wont you guys give me another monitor I said its no skin off your back my insurance and I pay for it what up with that? She said well Dr.
My future is bleak and I think I’ve to start counting my days. Is there any hope for me to live atleast 1 year more?
I am not clear about what the Coreg is to accomplish, because I am not clear on what I have, what is wrong, what caused it. I am concerned about what my options are if it does not "work". If my LVEF decreases 10% a year for three more years, I fear I will be dead. So the questions: 1. What questions should I ask when I see my (new) doctor this week? 2. Should I continue to see my (old) doctor? I have a follow up with him this week as well.
So I rescheduled for Wed. Good news is I haven't had any SOB or disiness at all for 3 days. Thanks again for the support. I'll keep updating.
Now I have low blood pressure...89/76 and 113/72. But my body feels as though my blood pressure is high. What is going on with that? I am lathargic and gaining more weight...can't exercise. What are the possible answers?
What is the benefit of the switch to coreg? At this point, I only know that her cardiologist felt that is was the "drug of choice" for her condition. What else can be done to try to restore her stamina/overall health? (she was preciously very active, as anone caring for a grandchild can attest to.) Is there any other treatment option we should consider? Thanks very much for your help and this wonderful service.
I have been to a new doctor recently and this is what he is recommending since my attacks are so extreme. If you have minor attacks, catheter is for you. Now I have to pay a $20,000 medical bill for a procedure that didn't work (yes, that was after insurance and 30k of the 100k price tag was adrenaline for the 11 hours I was under!!!!!
I assume your stated HR is for at rest, and while 90 is a bit high, something in the 70s would not be any reason for concern if you are over 50 years old. Younger people might expect to be in the 60s as an average/typical.
No, a bypass operation certainly does not remove the requirement for medication. A bypass is exactly what it says, it bypasses a blockage and does not remove it. This means there is plaque/fats in the Coronary arteries still posing a risk of rupture or fracture. The risk of stroke or heart attack is still there, the same as it was before the surgery. The only difference is that a better blood flow has been supplied to the deficit area.
We spoke with the Drs office today, and they have taken him OFF his COZAAR and COREG XR (coreg for only 2 days)....but with his ejection fraction of 15 is coming off the Coreg not going to hurt more then it helps? Anyone,,have any replys?
At what ages did you have your children?? Was your EF ever checked prior to January 2011? The Coreg and Lisinopril are more important than the aldactone unless you have extra swelling/fluid on board in your legs. But, my underlying suspicion is that your EF has been low for a long time possibly related to your pregnancies and that is why you developed a.fib. Are you still in a.fib and is the rate controlled?
Yes, you can live with that number, it all depends on what symptoms does she has and what , what is the reason for that and if there is other disease that agravate the condition.
What may work for one may not for the other, as well as what may work for you may not with something similar. It is also good to find out what is causing for you to feel worse (even with the medications) and just to talk to your doctor about it. I don't know of anything that works for my fibro problems, but everyone is different.
I keep a pretty steady 115/70 with the Coreg. This is a slightly higher dose of sotalol than normal (80mg normal).
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