Warfarin resistance

Common Questions and Answers about Warfarin resistance

jantoven

He said, no way is it a substitute fo warfarin... but again I tolerate warfarin well. But too, I've never had any severe cuts while on warfarin.
I understand it is common for the body to build resistance to chemical treatments, and that may include the need to increase the dose to stopping the medication altogether. You need to discuss with your doctor, and soon as the bright lights symptom sounds serious (more than dizziness) to me. Has you doctor discussed ablation with you?
Im concerned about proarrhythmias and toxicity. High Warfarin dose and resistance to remain in sinus suggests to me that Id need quite a high sotolol dose too. I asked to go on pradaxa - dabigitran etexilate - as Im concerned about calcification, which I already have in shoulder. 2 cardiologists, an electophysiologist and my GP all denied any knowledge of the vitamin K / Calcification mechanism. I wasnt given a thyroxin test ever, I.V. Magnesium or urine test on presenting with af.
Pulmonary hypertension is a condition with high blood pressure affecting the blood vessels in the lungs and the right side of your heart. The blockage or narrowing of these blood vessels creates resistance for blood flow through the lungs. In the later stages of the disease, the heart muscle weakens and fails. Unfortunately, pulmonary hypertension is not curable, but with treatment you could have fewer symptoms and a better quality of life.
As a nurse, I understand that LWMH is not indicated for long-tern anticoagulant use for mechanical valves and am concerned about the development of thrombosis. Have you seen warfarin resistance similar to this? Are there alternative oral anticoagulant therapies available? Is there a maximum dosage for warfarin?
Pulmonary hypertension is a condition with high blood pressure affecting the blood vessels in the lungs and the right side of your heart. The blockage or narrowing of these blood vessels creates resistance for blood flow through the lungs. In the later stages of the disease, the heart muscle weakens and fails. Unfortunately, pulmonary hypertension is not curable, but with treatment you could have fewer symptoms and a better quality of life.
stop warfarin 5 days pre-op; restart warfarin post-op as soon as oral fluids are tolerated. High thromboembolic risk: stop warfarin 4 days pre-op and start low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) at therapeutic dose; stop the LMWH 12-18 pre-op; restart LMWH 6 hours post-op (assuming haemostasis achieved); restart warfarin when oral fluids are tolerated; stop LMWH when INR = 2.0.
Management of afib will require antiarrythmic drugs and often includes the need for blood thinners like warfarin to help prevent blood clots that may become dislodged during periods of afib. Dislodged clots can cause stroke and lung embolism among others. Anticoagulants like warfarin require close monitoring and are not without serious risk of bleeding that may be life threatening if not managed carefully.
a ct scan in the er was the only thing that found it.....spent 6 days in hospital on morphine and warfarin, discharged on warfin and pain meds, but would like to know how long it is going to take till i feel better.......
Hi Joey, You mentioned earlier that your son had MTHFR and APC. MTHFR refers to the enzyme "Methylene-Tetra-Hydro-Folate-Reductase", while APCR refers to "Activated Protein C Resistance". Basically these terms refer to a disorder of the blood caused by a gene mutation to which forms the MTHFR enzyme. This can lead to a condition called Thrombophilia, which means that the body will have an increased tendency to form blood clots.
I am now on a therapeutic INR of 3.0-3.5 and taking 7mg daily warfarin. My exercise tolerance has increased and I am now able to walk about 500m without becoming too short of breath. Over the last couple of weeks I have had quite a lot of chest pain and discomfort and that was diagnosed as costochondritis. The last couple of days the chest pain has increased and I am having to take painkillers on a more frequent basis, especially to sleep.
Monotherapy using lamivudine has the longest history of use and shows highest rate of resistance. A 2003 study of 998 patients showed 65% lamivudine-resistance mutations in 5 years. Lamivudine should no longer be used as monotherapy. 2. Monotherapy using adefovir has 29% mutation probability in 240 weeks, according to a 2006 study of 125 patients. 3. Entecavir is 100-fold more potent than lamivudine or adefovir.
If the Amiodione stops the AFib you should be able to run better.... that is if the side effects are not too bad. If you are running while in AFib and you take Metoprolol (in any dose over 50 mg) you should be able to run through anything. Good luck.
I am an 81 year old male, had double-bypass surgery with aortic valve replaced over 3 years ago. Heart has been in A-Fib, since surgery, and on warfarin, but able to live a normal life, and participated in a cardio exercise class 3 times a week. Six months ago my echocardiogram ejection rate was 58%. I was fine until Oct. 2010, when I began feeling very tired, & noticed the beginning of edema in my feet and lower legs. In Jan.
Pulmonary hypertention is the resistance the right side of the heart has to pump against and probably is the cause of the enlarged right ventricle
Sorry about your diagnosis. Sounds like you are doing OK other than the numbness? I had shooting pain in the general area for a while. I can still "feel it" if I am too active or get dehydrated. I had numbness in my feet for about a week afterwards on and off (especially at night). My doctor put me on neurontin, and it did help. It's actually an epilepsy drug, but there are tons of anecdotal evidence of it helping for other things (off-label). It helps rewire misfiring nerves.
) at the Hepatitis Unity Forum on Delphi who is interested in this issue. Lately she's been researching the effect of insulin resistance on tx response, as well as other factors. Maybe direct this question to her as well? Very best of luck to you.
I take a large coumadin dose each day, 23.5 mg due to warfarin resistance. I have had a mild stroke. I have a huge scar on my chest and the valve makes a very loud ticking noise. So I am waiting for technology to catch up so that I can get this out of my chest. My husband presented with a thickened and probably bicuspid aortic valve associated with severe aortic insufficiency. A weight lifter for the past 20 years with an exercise program of at least 2 hrs. a day 5 days a week.
There may not be enough glucagon production and too much insulin release, depending the exact composition of the diet. 2. Excess of carbs may eventually lead to high insulin excretion, insulin resistance leading to diabetes potentially, disrupt insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) levels, which removes beta-amyloid in the brain, a key protein in the cause of Alzheimer's. 3.
There have been some incidental findings such as a blood clot in the subclavian vein, Protein S Deficiency (genetic blood coagulation disorder) and some disc bulges on my spine but doctors said these are not the causes of my shortness of breath and fatigue. I'm already on Warfarin therapy and I take medicine for acid reflux but I still have these symptoms.
I did tell the doc's I put her on some herbal stuff, not sure what they will actually say when we go, but we are keeping a close eye on her diabetes, blood pressure and warfarin levels. So far the numbers are good. I was some what worried about her warfarin levels so had them checked and they're staying steady! That is a big relief! Do you know of any other way other than by antibiotic use to rid the system of this nasty bacteria?
My husband is diabetic and needs it but why would you want to take it if you don't need it? Too much IR resistance information going around these days. Either your IR or your not. Tx life doesn't revolve around IR resistance, diabetes, obesity etc, etc. I think it's good to be aware, but all the information lately has been a bit much. Prior to tx fasting glucose was normal. My fasting has been at 100 - 103 for the last several months. 52 wks into tx.
Another downside is that even though it is bitter GF also has plenty of sugar which wont help with Insulin Resistance. GF also has some pro oxidant potential see link below http://www.medhelp.org/posts/show/498814 - HR, your views on Naringenin? Large amounts of GF may not be a good thing Taking Grapefruit in the months just prior to Tx seems like a good idea to me. Just not sure about during Tx yet.
Thanks so much. I've been on Warfarin since 1993. Take a look at this study. It could be that my Warfarin usage has protected me all these years. http://www.wellsphere.com/general-medicine-article/the-drug-warfarin-may-help-prevent-liver-failure-in-thousands-of-people-with-hepatitis-c/29809 The following is also revealing. "The aim of the present study was to determine if there was any correlation between HCV viral load and the severity of liver disease.
Also tell your doctor if you smoke, if you have high blood pressure or diabetes, if your ability to move around during your waking hours is limited, or if you are taking anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin).
I exercise moderately and am not considered overweight--well at least for a 53 year old man--but I was riding a stationary bike more frequently (4-5 x per week) and at a higher resistance level for a few month before this pain. If anyone knows what this is, any contribution to this thread would be appreciated.
Since i first commented on this thread in Sept, when i started my coffee therapy, i've upped my evening coffee to 2 cups mainly because i just love coffee..It does not keep me up now, before it would, maybe resistance. Anywho, other than just a few occasional flutters, my evening episodes have stopped. I've almost forgotten how they felt, 20 years of anything should be ingrained in your head right. I'm going to say, coffee cured me.
- Quadricep flexes - 3 sets of 15 - Calf flexes w/ resistance band around foot - 3 sets of 15 - outer Calf flexes w/ resistance band around foot - 3 sets of 15 - inner Calf flexes w/ resistance band around foot - 3 sets of 15 - Straight leg raises w/ electro stimulation machine attached to my quadriceps for 15 min. - Side leg raises - 3 sets of 15 - Bending knees 15 degrees, using a strap around foot and pulling towards body - 3 sets of 10 (holding for 5 sec) Increasing 15 degrees every week.
I am very healthy non-smoker - 50 year old female that is not over weight and I do cardio 3 - 5 times a week and resistance training with weights. I started having these same burst of involuntary intake of air a few weeks ago. This is so strange. I have had no previous surgery. I do have allergies and began taking Clariten D which in the past I just took plain Clariten. Also I started putting some Vicks vapor rub around my nose to breath easier when I go to bed.
MedHelp Health Answers