Warfarin genetic testing

Common Questions and Answers about Warfarin genetic testing

jantoven

, not the Warfarin. There is a newer (out for a few years for use in the USA) that is very different from Warfarin, but I can say I've seen class-action law suits advertized on TV concerning that drug. I don't recall the name, you doctor will know what else there is and if it might be "right " for you. This drug I refer to is much more expensive than Warfarin, which cost no more than a brand name aspirin. Why are you taking Warfarin? Do you suffer for atrial fibrillation?
I had a DVT in 2006 at the age of 24. After genetic testing I was informed that I was Compound Heterozygous MTHFR C677T/A1298C. Also positive heterozygous for the G20210A mutation in the Prothrombin gene. Initially i was perscribed temporary injections of lovenox and lifelong warfarin. My target INR range being 2.5-3.5 and I currently take 5mg of warfarin daily. I have never been told to see a hematologist, and I feel like there are other things I need to be doing.
Researchers have identified genetic variations that affect the way the body metabolizes warfarin. As such, genetic testing (called Warfarin Drug Response Testing) is available for some of these variations, which may be used to help doctors prescribe more effective and safer medications for the individual. The variations and genes tested for varies by lab, but you may want to discuss the benefits and limitations of this testing with your doctor.
I have been on warfarin ever since I have come off for 25 days so i can have the genetic testing done to see if i have a clotting problem but as soon as i go back to the doctor she made it clear she feels i need warfarin for the rest of my life even if there isnt a clotting problem, she said her decision is based on my age (46) the circumstances behind the surgery(the fact that it was done quickly(35 minutes) there were no complications and the fact that i got up immediately after surgery and w
5/’09, hospitalized due to methyldopa induced cholestasis, diagnosed w/ A fib. 8/’09, 14 days into Warfarin, she fell (cause unknown), suffering a skull fracture causing an acute subarachnoid and subdural hemorrhage. Initially paralyzed left side & recovered almost 90%. On our request, switched to Aspirin. 12/’09, open cholecystectomy due to acute cholecystitis w/ pigmented gallstones. In 5/’10 , she had a minor stroke.
If not, we recommend that you meet with a medical geneticist who can review your personal and family history and discuss the benefits and limitations of genetic testing for these conditions. In addition, there are known genetic variations that affect the way the body metabolizes certain medications such as plavix and warfarin (coumadin).
I've been taking a coated 325mg aspirin everyday because naturally i'm a nervous wreck about clotting again. My genetic testing was fine. My question is, does aspirin really assist in keeping the platelets from forming clots? As well, how much of a role does being overweight play in the formation of blood clots if you have no other predisposing factors ie: no birth control, non smoker etc? Thanks so much for all the helpful information.
I've been on warfarin about 6 years. I have 2 genetic factors for clots prothrombin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant. I had 3 clots in my left lung and 2 in my right lung. I have a suggestion for you to check http://www.drgourmet.com/warfarin/index.shtml If you follow his recommendation on what foods are high in K and what is low. I been consistent for a few years and only go for an INR test every month.
Thrombophilia is a blood clotting disorder in which the blood has a tendency to clot more than normal. Factor V is a protein in the blood needed for normal blood clotting. A genetic alteration in the factor V gene is called factor V Leiden (pronounced lie-den). Having factor V Leiden can increase your chance of developing a blood clot. For a person with one factor V Leiden gene, the genetic risk of having a blood clot is 5 to 7 times higher than the average person's risk.
I have also experienced constipation and do no usually urinate until after 4 pm, but these two problems have been occurring for several years. I also have a type of genetic thrombophilia and take warfarin sodium and low-molecular heparin, alternately. CT scans were done three times after the car accident and all were normal. I was referred to a neurologist for the headaches and (nn-contrast)MRI's were done of the brain and the spine. [I do not know the magnification.
Back in December, I had 2 episodes that led me to the hospital, and ultimately, was diagnosed with a PE. After further testing, there was nothing revealed that showed the cause. I was therapeutic on Coumadin when I had another episode which revealed another PE about a month later. As far as I know, they have run every known test which all come back negative. Every scan that has been run reveal no DVT.
I had no risk factors for blood clots other than being on birth control. I am not overweight, over 35 yrs, non smoking, had no genetic clotting disorders. I was on Warfarin for 6 months but am currently on no treatment. My question is now, should I be doing anything like taking asprin or anything? Also what about when I want to get pregnant? Do I just start the Heparin therapy when I find out I'm pregnant? What about unplanned pregnancies?
In 5/’09, while hospitalized due to methyldopa induced cholestasis, she was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. In 8/’09, 14 days into Warfarin therapy, she fell (cause unknown), suffering a skull fracture causing an acute subarachnoid and subdural hemorrhage. She was initially paralyzed on her left side. She recovered almost 90% after 3 weeks. On our request, she was switched from Warfarin to Aspirin.
They blew it if they suspected CADASIL last time and didn't say anything about the Warfarin. Is there a genetic test for CADASIL? I hope this article will be helpful. It says that while MRIs are usually helpful in distinguishing between MS and CADASIL, sometimes they are not definitive. It says "cerebral angiography is considered the gold standard for suggesting the diagnosis.
The Mayo ran my son thru a lot of tests and I also did a lot of tests and then they actually noticed a pattern in heart rythms between us on an ecg that seemed odd. Then they did the genetic test using the long qt testing method on him because it is the same gene, just opposite spectrum, I guess is how you'd say that. As for the icd firing, no warning whatsoever. Just bam, feels like someone walked up behind you and hit you in the middle of the back as hard as they could.
Have passed it on. There is a whole industry built up around Warfarin, its cheapness and INR testing, and I am sure this is a matter of budget maintenance, as Pradaxa is much more expensive. Prescribe it for one and all the Warfarin takers will want it - it has no dietary restrictions, no blood testing or monitoring. However, the risk of bleeds is increased and there is no antidote for this, unlike Warfarin. Watch this space with the NHS!
When that is complete and the clot is under control, they can do the genetic testing to determine if it is a hereditary issue or not. I do not really have any other risk factors though. The only "long trip" I had taken was a 3 hour drive, in which I stopped several times to take my dog out. All signs point to the pill. All of this happened 9/10/09 (the diagnosis). I have been regularly going in to have my INR/Protyme tested.
Lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin are blood factors that, despite the names, promote blood clotting. In consequence, they impair the nourishment of an early pregnancy and thereby contribute to miscarriage. Aspirin interfers with the formation of clots and is the simplest therapy that has help other patients. Heparin is a second medication that "thins the blood" to reduce clotting. Oral anticoagulants (coumadin, warfarin) are not used in pregnancy.
They could see the scarring from the pasdt. They were surprised to discover this was from when I was 14 ( 41 years ago ). I also have a genetic disorder - homocystinuria. I am also having a blood test done next week to determine if I have a gene that puts me at risk for clots. My question is that with 41 years of not having blood clots do I really need to be on coumadin ?
You may want to take a look at fecal antibody testing for celiac and the related genetic testing that can be done. Check out www.enterolab.com. Dr. Fine worked with an Italian group some years ago and developed a fecal antibody test for celiac/gluten intolerance. It was based on studies of some with IBS. They found about 25% of those with IBS didn't have IBS at all. Instead, they had silent celiac. They only seemed to show celiac antibodies in the GI tract, not systemically.
Sorry about your diagnosis. Sounds like you are doing OK other than the numbness? I had shooting pain in the general area for a while. I can still "feel it" if I am too active or get dehydrated. I had numbness in my feet for about a week afterwards on and off (especially at night). My doctor put me on neurontin, and it did help. It's actually an epilepsy drug, but there are tons of anecdotal evidence of it helping for other things (off-label). It helps rewire misfiring nerves.
My neurologist started me on a heavy dose of blood thinners (warfarin) for 6 months. My blood clot was dut to the nuva ring birthcontrol. I was in ICU for 2 days and on the neuro unit for 4 days back in november 2008. I still have headaches but they aren't severe like they were. I am also always tired which the doctor assured me was a side effect of the blood clot and the blood thinners. I am so sorry for all of you whose doctors don't seem to care but there is hope out there!
There have been some incidental findings such as a blood clot in the subclavian vein, Protein S Deficiency (genetic blood coagulation disorder) and some disc bulges on my spine but doctors said these are not the causes of my shortness of breath and fatigue. I'm already on Warfarin therapy and I take medicine for acid reflux but I still have these symptoms.
Notes from "Chronic Hepatitis B: Preventing, Detecting, and Managing Viral Resistance" by Keeffe, Emmet B., Dieterich, Douglas T., Pawlotsky, Jean-Michael, and Benhamou, Yves in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology 2008;6:268-274. Full paper in http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/15423565 1. Monotherapy using lamivudine has the longest history of use and shows highest rate of resistance.
I have never moved moutains as fast as today. I feel Debbie - what was offered medically with this doctor I talked with today will definately be a step in the right direction. Here is some keys points you and I discussed to get this doctor the information she needs to do the evaluation if you chose to see her next week. 1. gather up her recent labs she had done and get a hardcopy of the report. A. - look that over and see if the Free T3 and Free T4 along with TSH was done. 1a.
Well I may not be the brightest kid on the block but was raised to use logic and finding out I had IR made all the difference in my approach to treatment for HCV I listened to CoWriter CS and HR all three said the same thing need to treat the IR First Once you are diabetic it is a steady downhill road no cure for Diabetes but there is a definate program to treat Type 2 diabetes with out having to take injections the rest of your life So finding out IR sooner rather than too late, was a b
I don't intend to be unsympathetic--having been through all this myself (over the last twenty years at least)--but since you are young and have been repeatedly shown by testing that your heart is healthy, and since you can do all the normal activity that life requires you to do, you have pretty much all the reassurance that any mortal doc can give you that your heart is OK. Now your job is to find a way to deal with your fear. You say you have tried antidepressants.
Thanks so much. I've been on Warfarin since 1993. Take a look at this study. It could be that my Warfarin usage has protected me all these years. http://www.wellsphere.com/general-medicine-article/the-drug-warfarin-may-help-prevent-liver-failure-in-thousands-of-people-with-hepatitis-c/29809 The following is also revealing. "The aim of the present study was to determine if there was any correlation between HCV viral load and the severity of liver disease.
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