Warfarin and atrial fibrillation

Common Questions and Answers about Warfarin and atrial fibrillation

jantoven

Prior to then I had been taking statins off and on due to muscle pain. After my valve was replaced I had atrial fibrillation and was put on Warfarin. As well as muscle pain I began to get pains in my joints as well as muscles. I again stopped the statins and the muscle pains subsided but the joint pains increased as my warfarin dosage was increased. A second cardioversion cured my atrial fibrillation and the surgeon said that I could stop warfarin after being in sinus rhythm for six months.
Atrial fibrillation (“Afib”) with reduced heart function (low ejection fraction / “EF”) is a challenge because uncontrolled atrial fibrillation can trigger episodes of heart failure and fluid overload and vice versa – poorly controlled heart failure can worsen atrial fibrillation. Additionally, cardiac treatments need to be chosen carefully so that treatment of one condition doesn’t worsen the other.
•Drugs to try to prevent atrial fibrillation •Drugs to prevent blood clots — Patients with atrial fibrillation and heart disease are at especially high risk of stroke. •Blood-thinning medications (anticoagulants) such as aspirin may be prescribed. Thanks for sharing and if you have any followup questions feel welcome to respond. Take care.
probably medication is the go for you. my mother has atrial fibrillation and she takes atenol and it works excellent. doesn't control the rhythm, but controls the speed and her high blood pressure well.
I have gleaned invaluable information from these forums, keep up the good work. My question relates to Atrial Fibrillation in conjunction with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy with first degree AV Block and Left Bundle Branch Block. I have partial obstruction of opening of Mitral Valve and moderate Subaortic Stenosis. I am a 57 year old Caucasian woman and I have fairly frequent Angina and Palpitations which have been previously connected to PVC's and Ventricular Tachycardia.
Of course, it you are taking any medications that restrict the use of aspirin, then follow those instructions. I take Warfarin and aspirin, but I have chronic AFib, so the chance of it causing a blood clot is too high to ignore, still it is only about 3% a year for me.
Is it possible to have both atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter? I am on the drug flecainide and wonder if this is safe.
Too high (or too low) calcium may cause a variety of arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation may have a lot of causes. Most of them are related to structural changes in the left atrium (dilatation or hypertrophy) which tends to worsen BY having atrial fibrillation, which is why atrial fibrillation starts with brief episodes and ends up as a permanent condition. Hypertension seems to be a major risk factor.
I'm in good condition and apparently developed A.F. last winter. I'm on warfarin 5mg daily and now 100 mg of flecainide 2x perday. It's under control at least from my pulse which I check daily and based on how I feel. Last night after eating Chinese and earlier in the day drinking a diet pepsi, I went to bed. I woke up after falling asleep for 30 minutes and was dreaming I could not get a pillow off my chest no matter how I tried. The next thing I knew I was shaking like I had tremors.
Are there alternatives to coumadin for treating atrial fibrillation in an 89 year old male? This discussion is related to <a href='/posts/show/794153'>Live Health Chat: Atrial Fibrillation, April 13th (Special Guest Dr. Bruce Lindsay, Cleveland Clinic)</a>.
Last week I woke up from sleep with pounding, irregular heartbeat. I went to ER and was admitted with atrial fibrillation and was kept in overnight so my heart could be restored to sinus rhythm. I'm now taking Slozem and waiting to see a cardiologist in a few week's time. I'm terrified it will return and very anxious to find out what might have caused it. If anyone can post advice or suggestions it would be massively appreciated.
Hi! You'll have to define that "touch" of A-fib. Just a few seconds? It's common to have small bursts of A-fib, but if the arrhythmia gets sustained (which it may if you have untreated hypertension, chronic stress or manifest heart disease) it may be a good idea to treat it. Treatment in young people as yourself is usually ablation.
I have been diagnosed with bradycardia and atrial fibrillation and will soon be given a dual chamber permanent pacemaker. I notice that in the doctor's reply it was said that a pacemaker didn't treat AF. This has confused me since my understanding of a pacemaker is that it gives you a regular sinus heartbeat and that arrhythmias would be a thing of the past. If it doesn't treat arrhythmia, then what use is it?
I was switched from Atelenol to Metoprolol and now I have atrial fibrillation all the time. What is going on? Should I ask to be put back to Atelenol?
Is there a cumumlative increase in stroke risk if you are medically rate controlled, coagulated and with blood pressure medically stable while suffering fron asymptomatic atrial fibrillation?
I am obese and have sleep apnea, well controlled HBP, moderately well controlled diabetes type II. Just diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, will be having holter monitor and stress echocardiogram next week. Have had heart palpitations since my late 20s, drs considered them harmless, and they almost disappeared when I started BP meds.
Following a stay in hospital having gone to the hospital ER of my own volition, they kept me for four days and changed my medication to Bisoprolol and Warfarin. I reverted to sinus spontaneously after about three days and that was over a month ago - so far so good! I am awaiting a Holter monitor to see how often I get spells of AF. My question is - what ought I to do when I am aware of the rhythm having changed to AF?
My blood pressure was 117/60 and my bpm was 58. I'm 5' tall and weigh around 120. My full checkup and blood work up is absolutely excellent. She did the ekg twice and then informed me that I was in an extreme bout of atrial fibrillation. Don't know where that's coming from. I've never been diagnosed with that.
Rate control medication to control the heart rate Rhythm control medication, sometimes called drug cardioversion, to put the heart back into normal sinus rhythm Your doctor will decide which rhythm control drug is best for you based on the type of atrial fibrillation you have and your medical history, including the presence or absence of other existing heart disease.
, which I still haven't took, because I read the side effects lol. So my question is, is paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation and dyspnea dangerous? I also noticed that when I'm standing up or walking my heart rate is usually 92-100bpm, I actually bought that device that you wear on your finger that monitors heart rate. When I'm lying though my heart rate jumps all the way down to 66-70. I have no idea what that means.
I can get dizzy if I push myself after this point and have to revert to a fast walk. I've had a heart catheter and an EP with an ablation for an atrial flutter in my right atrium and nothing has changed. I've had two event monitor studies. The first one was judged by one EP as showing small runs of Afib and the second set, which consisted of many more events showed only an irregular heartbeat in sinus rhythm. The EP who did my ablation wasn't convinced of my first EP's diagnosis of Afib.
I am way too young for heart problems, and the stress is what is bothering me most! Can stress and anxiety cause Atrial Fibrillation??
I can however advise that my cardio-electrologist was keen to establish that I was suffering from A/F and not atrial flutter and asked me to scource ECG print-outs from my local hospital. I provided to him by post (we have a tyrrany of distance in rural Australia) A/F traces from three particular episodes which had really got my attention due to extended duration, chest pain and shortness of breath - and I'd taken myself off to hospital - and as far as I know, he's happy with those.
My husband has this condition, and his specialist has him on warfarin, simvastatin, atenelol,and baby aspirin. He goes to the coumadin(warfarin) clinic once a month, and has been staying in range, except it seem when the eather changes, he spikes either up or down, depending on the temperature. It seems to me if someone could bother to explain what the effect of certain environmental and dietary changes have, we could make adjustments as necessary.
In the past number of months I’ve been experiencing occasional bouts of Atrial Fibrillation triggered by belching. Currently I am taking Plavix and Asprin and now my Doctor wants to start me on Warfarin as well. This suggestion makes me very uncomfortable. I feel that a pacemaker would be a healthier alternative.
I came out of surgery in normal sinus rhythm and remained that way for about a month, then I went into atrial flutter and then atrial fibrillation. I have been in AFib since that time and take a beta blocker to hold my heart rate down to below 90 for resting HR and I take Warfarin to mitigate the blood clots and strokes. I have never had a discussion involving AV node ablation and a pace maker. What AFib symptoms would cause you to consider a this action?
Control heart rate and anticoagulate, and if there are no symptoms and the heart rate is controlled, then leave the patient in afib Cardioversion for patients who still have symptoms and the heart rate can't be controlled, or for whom normal sinus rhythm is preferred . I hope this helps explain your Dr's thinking...
He is going to try a drug effective in maintaining sinus rhythm, Electrical cardioversion and consider Ablation procedure but he has already told me that these procedures may not work because I have been in permanent atrial fibrillation to long. I am currently on Diltiazem 360mg , Warfarin 5mg, and Clonazepam 1mg (when necessary). If nothing else works what’s next? I am at the Maximum dosage on my medications, and if Ablation is not an option, Is a pace maker my next option?
I went to work in Jakarta for two weeks but picked up a micoplasma infection. This resulted in pneumonia, atrial fibrillation, myocarditis and congestive heart failure. While in Indonesia I self prescribed Zithromax and cured the pneumonia but I didn't appreciate how sick I really was then (and I was working with doctors on their health system who didn't pick up on it either). When I got back to Australia I was admitted into CCU.
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