Vomiting and hypokalemia

Common Questions and Answers about Vomiting and hypokalemia

vomiting

These include renal artery stenosis and tumors (generally non-malignant) of the adrenal glands. Hypertension and hypokalemia can also be seen with a deficiency of the 11β-hydroxylase enzyme which allows cortisols to stimulate aldosterone receptors. This deficiency can either be congenital or caused by consumption of glycyrrhizin, which is contained in extract of licorice, sometimes found in Herbal supplements, candies and chewing tobacco.
I don't know what the relation between oxy abuse and an electrolyte imbalance would be... hmmm??? There are many reasons for hypokalemia- dehydration, calcium imbalance, diarrhea, vomiting, etc... I can't figure how any of these reasons would be associated with taking too much oxy. Muscle weakness and muscle soreness can be one of the symtoms of withdrawals from opiates- muscle cramping can be a sign of hypokalemia. Why do you ask? Just curious...
Kidney losses Certain kidney disorders such as renal tubular acidosis (for example, chronic kidney failure and acute kidney failure) Magnesium deficiency, Leukemia, Cushing's disease (and other adrenal disorders) Loss of potassium through stomach and intestines Vomiting, Enemas or excessive laxative use, Diarrhea, After ileostomy operation, Effect of medicines, Water pills (diuretics) Medicines used for asthma or emphysema (beta-adrenergic agonist type of drugs such as bronchodilators, steroids
The dr office called me the next day and I told them about the nausea and vomiting and feeling poorly and their response was that the potassium test was low so eat a banana. I don't know what to do at this point and yet I don't want to waste an ER expense if unnecessary. Please, any suggestions?
Causes of magnesium deficiency include alcohol abuse, poorly controlled diabetes, excessive or chronic vomiting and/or diarrhea. Certain drugs can also deplete magnesium levels such as osmotic diuretics, cisplatin, ciclosporin, amphetamines, and possibly proton pump inhibitors. There are also certain medical conditions that cause a lack of magnesium in one's system.
these may include kidney disease, too little water intake, and loss of water due to diarrhea and/or vomiting. •A decreased concentration of sodium (hyponatremia) occurs whenever there is a relative increase in the amount of body water relative to sodium. This happens with some diseases of the liver and kidney, in patients with congestive heart failure, in burn victims, and in numerous other conditions.
There are many listervs with migraine sufferers and epileptics mourning hair loss and topomax---and their neurologists' denial of the relationship. I located a PDR, and it does list alopecia as a "less common side effect". I decided to pursue expert neurologists at a research university 3 hours away from me for help---and a medication switch. They denied my hair loss could be due to the topomax, flatly, and recommended I use Head and Shoulders.
He takes Lisinopril and he has had several episodes of lightheadedness, nausea and vomiting, and low BP while playing golf. Are there other classes of anti-hypertensives that don't result in hypotension DT excessive sweating? He's also had 7 kidney stones in the last 5 months. Could Lisinopril and his excessive sweating be a contributing factor?
increased appetite, nausea and vomiting: Infrequent: aphthous stomatitis, cholelithiasis, colitis, dysphagia, eructation, esophagitis, gastritis, gastroenteritis, glossitis, gum hemorrhage, hyperchlorhydia, increased salivation, liver function tests abnormal, melena, mouth ulceration, nausea/vomiting/diarrhea, stomach ulcer, stomatitis, thirst: Rare: biliary pain, bloody diarrhea, cholecystitis, duodenal ulcer, enteritis, esophageal ulcer, fecal incontinence, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, hemate
I'm placing this in a post TX forum, but it also occurs to me that it may be useful for those who are considering treatment. (it may be off topic in this forum or thread, but it behooves people to make sure they are not vitamin deficient before treating- there are studies which show vitamin A or D can improve viral response) Anyway......
The patient experienced hyperhydrosis, pallor, depressed level of consciousness, hypokinesia, hypotension, sinus bradycardia, hypoglycemia, hypokalemia, respiratory failure and vomiting. The patient recovered.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypokalemia You may have to cut and paste but I recommend you read this. Ask yourself if this could explain your symptoms. If so,tell your doctor. If the tightness in your chest comes back PLEASE call your doctor or call 911. Sometime if a women is having a heart attack this might be their only symptom until it is to late. Again I am not trying to scare you but I almost lost my life and I paid over 12,000.00 in med. bills -over something as easy as one pill a day.
[1] Severe magnesium deficiency can cause hypocalcemia, low serum potassium levels (hypokalemia), retention of sodium, low circulating levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), neurological and muscular symptoms (tremor, muscle spasms, tetany), loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, personality changes [2] and death from heart failure.
We lived in Las vegas and I dropped a lot of weight after the baby and was hospitalized because I thought I was having a heart attack- couldn't catch my breath- was nauseous- cold hands and feet- rapid heartbeat- total freak out- My paper work from the hospital states- I had hypokalemia and hyperglycema- had a stress test- enzymes negative and ejection fraction of 50%.
Kate, Anorexia nervosa can result in several medical complications. Hypokalemia, low levels of potassium in the blood, may result from recurrent or excessive vomiting or diarrhea. Other electrolyte and lab abnormalities may also be noted. It is important to understand why your daughter had a vomiting episode. Is it a continuation of the illness or related to another problem. Please discuss this further with your daughters physician.
Hello, I am a 49 yr old female who after 6 days of a fever as high as 104 for 6 days, nausea and occasional vomiting, (diagnosed at 4 days with sinusitis and placed on zithromax) who ended up in the ED at day 6 and was diagnosed with pyelonephritis and dehydration. My gfr was 37, my bun24 and creat 1.6. My K+ was 2.9 at this time. About 6 mos prior I was diagnosed with hypertension( mostly a high diastolic around 90-100) and was placed on hyrochlorathiazide 12.
My first question here is why do you have hypokalemia? This can be caused by vomiting, diarrhea, laxatives, diuretics (fluid pills), kidney disease, and a hormonal imbalance called primary aldosteronism. Are you taking any medications that lower the heart rate? If so these should be stopped following discussion with your doctor. Before considering any intervention for arrhythmia or palpitations, the underlying issue (i.e. hypokalemia and whatever is causing it) needs to be treated first.
neuromuscular abnormalities such as hyperreflexia, myoclonus, tremor, rigidity, and ataxia; and gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal cramping, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if metoclopramide is prescribed in combination with serotonin reuptake inhibitors.
Vomiting, diarrhea, diuretics, and excessive perspiration are all causes of a severe potassium loss. There are others, but these are the main culprits. Just put in "causes of hypokalemia" in your search engine and you will see all the causes. Some medications may cause you to be hypokalemic. Check the sheets that come with your meds to see if any of them cause loss of potassium. Take Care!
This started with fever and body aches for 2 weeks and then she was admitted to a hospital in India and was treated with Urosepsis for around one week and discahrged. Later on after 2-3 days she developed complaints of vomiting and fever then she was admitted again. After persistent vomiting she had sudden cardio-pulmanory arrest, and was resuscitated. After that she was put on mechanical invasive ventilation.
She just had colon cancer surgery and still lying in the hospital after 2 weeks with complain of bloated stomach, vomiting and nausea. Fluid has to be drained out from her stomach from time to time. She cannot eat at all. The digestive tract or the intestine does not seem to be fucntioning normal. Are this serious complication or is it normal? She was a smoker for almost her entire life with COPD condition. Will this affect her recovery?
A deficiency can occur in people with diabetes, those who use diuretics or digitalis preparations, the elderly, those with pancreatitis, chronic alcoholism, kwashiorkor, pregnancy, cirrhosis of the liver, arteriosclerosis or kidney malfunction, those on low-calorie or high-carbohydrate diets, and those who have severe malabsorption such as that caused by chronic diarrhea or vomiting....
•serious arrhythmias •muscle weakness and myalgia •disturbed heart rhythm •more risk of hyponatremia with confusion and seizures. Low potassium (hypokalemia) has many causes.
Hello Dear, Known causes of potassium deficiency include excessive diarrhea and vomiting. The treatment in these cases should be for the diarrhea and vomiting, and ensuring there continues to be sufficient potassium in the diet. Mineral supplements may also be necessary. If the vomiting is self-induced, as in bulimia, psychiatric treatment may be indicated. Hyperthyroidism, an illness of the thyroid, the main hormone producing gland, is also known to cause potassium deficiency.
We went to her doctor and she thought pleurisy, so we went to a pulmonologist who did more x-rays and a ct scan with contrast, as well as a breathing test/lung function test. All came back normal, yet she has had the pain consistently for over a month. The pulmonologist thought it might be neuromuscular, and simply said take Advil and let me know how it goes. My daughter is a dance major in college, and when they did they blood test they said that her potassium was very low.
Everything became dark on her Right side, her face twisted and she began having the seizure. She actually went limp and to be honest, she was taking her last breath. I started CPR because I did not know what was wrong. She started coming back to life and I kept up the CPR until the EMT's got her. They said I should not have started CPR. I place an object in her mouth to stop her from chewing her tounge. I was told I should not have done this either.
4 years ago after my first child, I began having RUQ pain, nauseousness, and some vomiting. I had clay-colored stools for a week. My PCP ordered an abdominal ultrasound in which my gallbladder appeared normal. No labs were done. My symptoms resolved over time. 2 weeks ago I awoke at 12am with excruciating RUQ pain, nauseousness, and vomiting like textbook biliary colic. I spent the night in the ER on pain and anti-emetic meds. The pain lasted 7 hrs.
Digitalization started but Heart rate still 140/min T3 and T4 levels normal. ELectrolytes normal except slight hypokalemia. Lady was pregnant and delivered healthy baby 6 months back She comes from middle class family. Other info upon request. Please e-mail.
She had been admitted earlier to another hospital where she complained of vomiting, diarrohea,for 3 days. She was treated with loperamide and domperidone. She later started developing abdominal distension. After tapping the fluid, distension again started. The fluid was normal in fluid contents. Admitted on Sunday to our hospital. Emergency operation was done to relive obstruction. The cause of obstruction was omental piece winding around the distal ilieum.
The electrolyte can be depleted when too much is excreted through either the kidneys or colon. Any recent bouts of vomiting and/or diarrhea? Do you take a diuretic (water pill) to help control blood pressure or reduce leg swelling? Have you been on Prednisone (or another steroid) lately? There is a type of polyp that causes the colon to leak potassium. I assume that's why they are looking to do a colonoscopy.
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