Varicose veins laser ablation

Common Questions and Answers about Varicose veins laser ablation

varicose-veins

Indeed, treatment may be invasive (surgical) or noninvasive which include sclerotherapy, laser ablation, radiofrequency ablation and a lot more. However, it is best that you confirm the diagnosis with your physician and discuss the best option for you. The treatment will depend on the severity of the condition and your medical history. Additional diagnostic tests such as duplex ultrasound exam may also be indicated. Take care and regards.
Hi! Laser ablation of varicose veins is a good technique with few complications and high success rates and low recurrence rates. However, varicose veins do tend to recur after the best treatments. Hope this helps. Take care! The medical advice given should not be considered a substitute for medical care provided by a doctor who can examine you. The advice may not be completely correct for you as the doctor cannot examine you and does not know your complete medical history.
If any of the causes which can be controlled are detected then taking care of those causes can reduce the progression of varicose veins. Yes, laser is a good option however whether it is good for you or not can be judged by your vascular specialist only. Hope this helps. Do let me know if there is any thing else and keep me posted. Take care!
Found moderate endometriosis and of course, varicocele or large tangle of varicose veins, only on left side, due to nutcracker. Dr removed endo with laser. Dr also used laser ablation on varicocele walls to prevent it from pulling on my uterus. I am now three weeks post laparoscopy. Initially my left kidney hurt, but has since stopped. Now I am having pain at the surface of my skin in my left leg crease near groin area. I am guessing this is where the varicose veins re-routed.
I would suggest you to go for a second opinion near a reputed General Surgeon. Varicose veins are most common in the superficial veins of the legs, which are subject to high pressure when standing. Besides cosmetic problems, varicose veins are often painful, especially when standing or walking. They often itch, and scratching them can cause ulcers. Serious complications are rare. Non-surgical treatments include sclerotherapy, elastic stockings, elevating the legs, and exercise.
In response to your question, the varicose veins are blown out veins carrying blood backwards and adding to the burden of the normal veins. Getting them out of the system lightens the load on the normal ones. The only exception is when the deep venous system is occluded and the varicosity is the only way blood can return to the heart. This should be obvious with an appropriate duplex doppler study.
I had undergone a right endovenous laser ablation of the greater saphenous vein for my varicose veins about 9 months ago. The surgery caused nerve injury resulting in severe case of numbness over the medial calf in the distribution of the right saphenous nerve. I have undergone nerve conduction study which shows normal left spahenous nerve, but absense of the right spahenous nerve.
My first liver doc told me the more I knew the better off I'd be so I spend a lot of time doing independent research trying to figure these things out. Also weakening of the veins and capillaries in the extremities is pretty common with aging regardless of health.So for those of you that are older. Yup for you it may just be a part of the aging process.Never hurts to stick your hand in the docs face and go oi! For me avoiding planes and eating better seems to have worked mostly.
I, myself, had a radical hysterectomy in April of 2007 because of ovarian bloat and the fact that my uterus was grossly enlarged. It weighed 5 pounds when it was removed! Last summer I had to have laser ablation of pre-cancerous cells in my vaginal vault. And just these past several days I've started to bleed from my vagina a bright red color with what appears to be tiny clots.
I feel cheated . Just feel as though I have gone through all that for nothing. Also had an thermal balloon ablation done in November 2005 was told this was the Non-surgical alternative to a hysterectomy, it failed!!! and when I asked why it had failed he said it was because he "probably didnt have the water hot enough" which is why we went down the route of a hysterectomy. "no more bleeding guaranteed" .
Yet another woman here, relieved to find she's not alone. I've had the same symptoms since age 33, and I'm 53 now. Mine started when I had a botched laser cone biopsy of my cervix which left my cervix a mass of scar tissue. I always assumed that my pain had something to do with my screwed up cervix. My symptoms were so weird that I never mentioned them to my doctor. I've done a bunch of Google searches but never got the right one to get any information.
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