Type 1 diabetes insulin resistance

Common Questions and Answers about Type 1 diabetes insulin resistance

diabetes

I have a sugar issue...i believe i am insulin resistance or type 2 diabetic... In the past i have been a heavy drinker for years while consuming lots of icecream/candy, pizza, beer, etc... I've tried in the past to get fat intentionally (add any weight) and failed..I wont gain a pound nomatter how much i eat...Which indicates My insulin producing is very low...This is a guess obviously I bought a glucose meter and Tested today. My morning fasted was 67.
However, common sense dictates that weight loss, if overweight, and correcting elevated cholesterol, triglycerides, and blood sugar should be beneficial in NAFLD ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Cirrhosis causes insulin resistance, a primary feature in type 2 diabetes. As insulin resistance progresses, it causes excess glucose to buildup in the blood, which leads to type 2 diabetes.
I'm sorry but I don't know too much about insulin resistance except how it works in type 2 diabetes, but I have never heard of someone taking that much metformin who is not diabetic. If I were you I would read up on insulin resistance, and I would make an appointment to see an endocrinologist. There is something wrong with this picture imho: 1. Why he is treating insulin resistance without diabetes so aggressively and 2.
This problem is the main cause of type 2 diabetes, which is not an auto-immune disease like type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, insulin-resistance is rarely a problem, but you could discuss this with your doctor and have him or her better explain why the tests that have been run on your daughter indicate type 1 instead of type 2 diabetes.
I'm so glad you are trying to clean yourself up, but do see a doctor on being insulin resistant. I almost died because of this. Insulin resistance is nothing to take for granted. Please seek medical advice, and keep up the great work for trying to clean up.
That is totally within the normal range! Even if your doctor anticipates you having insulin resistance and proceeding to develop diabetes you aren't there yet. It would be much more appropriate to recommend a combination of diet for weight loss, cutting carbs and exercise. I'm going to research Insulin Resistance to see if I'm missing something, but that is what I'm seeing now. You need to ask your doctor to explain his treatment and what he is seeing in your medical picture.
Sutapa Banerjee, Kousuke Saito, Malika Ait-Goughoulte, Keith Meyer, Ratna B Ray, Ranjit Ray Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has a significantly increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Insulin resistance is a critical component of T2DM pathogenesis. Several mechanisms are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of HCV related insulin resistance.
(Assuming, of course, you haven't increased food or decreased exercise). Unfortunately, some type 1's do develop insulin resistance after many years especially if during that time you ate carbs pretty freely and bolused for it. Insulin resistance leads to weight gain. You might talk to your doctor about possibly prescribing something for insulin resistance if he feels that is the problem. You definitely need to check your thyroid, too, as thyroid disease is very common in type 1's.
I’m not suggesting it be ignored either; but a balance needs to be found. Type 1 diabetes typically involves underproduction of insulin from the beta cells in the pancreas. Type 2, on the other hand, can be a combination of factors; underproduction of insulin, coupled with insulin resistance that prevents cells from absorbing or utilizing the insulin that *is* produced. A type 1diabetic typically requires very little exogenous insulin; they can get by with injecting small amounts.
Is there any correlation between elevated Alt and insulin resistance??? I found out in January of 2013 (almost 1 year ago), that I am insulin resistant. I received my blood tests results, and I am worried. My ALT is elevated. Prior to this it has always been in the normal range...I have recent blood work results from August, May, and January of 2013 to compare it to. What could this mean? It was my Endocrinologist who ran the blood work.
I agree that during those days, she may need to eat fewer carbs, for adding insulin just isn't going to help much if insulin-resistance is the real problem. I believe it is very important for ALL type 1 women to carefully monitor their monthly cycles so these days do not take us by surprise. In time, patterns will become more regular and she can figure out how to best care for her health during these hormonal swings. She has lots of company, for what you describe is pretty common.
Insulin resistance is a characteristic of Type 2 diabetes (by the way this is a Type 1 forum, which is another sort of diabetic condition)
I have read that only 10 percent of all diabetics have true type 1 diabetes, although some type 2 diabetics who take insulin are sometimes wrongly called type 1 just because they take insulin. Type 1 diabetes is sometimes referred to as 'autoimmune diabetes' because the cause is a damaged immune system. I am not a medical professional, but from what I have read, I can give a simplified explanation of how it happens.
1) What would indicate insulin resistance with this test? I am considering switching doctors because I am not sure if the doc I am seeing is right for me. From NIH MEDLINE encyclopedia: Normal blood values for a 75-gram oral glucose tolerance test used to check for type 2 diabetes: Fasting: 60 -100 mg/dL 1 hour: less than 200 mg/dL 2 hours: less than 140 mg/dL. Between 140-200 mg/dL is considered impaired glucose tolerance or pre-diabetes.
1. Fasting glucose [blood sugar] test 2. A1c test 3. Thyroid test 4. Pancreas test, if necessary 5. Lastly, if necessary, an insulin resistant test As far as exercise, are you able walk without pain? If yes, go walk around your neighborhood for 30 minutes a day. Walking really does help burn of excess glucose.
1 - testing so far is not diagnostic of insulin resistance, but PCOS is an insulin resistance syndrome, so the basic tests may be normal in early disease 2 - depends on the doc, some would treat both 3 - this can be done, the ER version decreases stomach side effects. I am not as up to date with the role of glucophage in PCOS, but is is a common approach. Diet/exercise is the best approach. Thyroid levels look ok, no room to increase the doses though.
Researchers Discover Hepatitis C Causes Insulin Resistance in Muscle 09 March 2010 We have known for several years that Hepatitis C, a common cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer, also makes people three to four times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. In studying the insulin resistance of 29 people with Hepatitis C, Australian researchers have confirmed that they have high insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes.
I know I am insulin dependent because I cannot take my pump off except for the rare few minutes or so without my sugar sky rocketing. Now would u still call this Type 2 Diabetes or Type 1? Hearing the words Juvenile Diabetes associated with Type 1 throws me off obviously because I was not diagnosed as a juvenile. But also the words Insulin Dependent are associated with the Type 1. So I DO fit into that category.
Insulin resistance is the term used when the body needs more insulin than normal to control the blood sugar. Only when the pancreas can no longer produce sufficient insulin to overcome the resistance does diabetes occur, so TESTING THE BLOOD SUGAR ALONE WILL NOT BE ENOUGH TO ESTIMATE INSULIN RESISTANCE." "it is clear that INSULIN RESISTANCE IS UNDESIRABLE EVEN IF THE BLOOD SUGAR REMAINS RELATIVELY NORMAL (i.e. in the non-diabetic range).
And as we know, hyperinsulinemia makes interferon ineffective. Co Caffeine worsens insulin resistance in prediabetics. Family Practice News April 15 2007 WASHINGTON -- Caffeine intake appears to exaggerate post-meal insulin resistance in prediabetic adults who regularly drink several cups of coffee each day, according to preliminary results of a randomized, double-blind, crossover study of 50 individuals.
Insulin doesn't make people gain weight, though sometimes people lose weight when initially diagnosed with very high numbers and when their blood sugar gets under control they continue eating the same way and gain weight. Another cause of weight gain in Type 1's is insulin resistance. This is normally a characteristic of Type 2 diabetes, but type 1's who are in the "eat whatever you want and bolus for it" school of diet will both gain weight and develop IR.
I am not a physician, but a volunteer and the mom of a type 1 diabetic. I understand your frustration. We felt the same way when our daughter was on shots. She was on NPH and Humolog. We gave since switched to the pump 3 years ago.
Some people with Diabetes Type 2 need oral medications and others need insulin. (Type 2 diabetes means they don't produce enough insulin. Type 1 means they don't produce ANY insulin.
Type 2 is very similar in treatment with diet, excercise and sometimes insulin and also manifests the same complications, but are very different in the presentation of what happens with the beta cells. Type 2 creates a resistance to how the body uses insulin where type 1's beta cells can no longer produce insulin. Markie is also correct that we still do not know enough about how type 1 happens. Probably type 2 as well.
I'm 21 years old in college, and I have had type 1 diabetes for 12 years now, and i have always eaten good, and exercised regularly, but just recently, i wanted to lose some weight, around 10 pounds, but for some reason i am finding it really hard to lose weight. I work out about 3-4 times a week. Usually i do a lot of cardio to burn the calories, so about 2 miles on the treadmill. But i still cant lose any weight. I was just wondering if being diabetic had something to do with that.
My 11 year old son has had Type 1 diabetes since age 5. His A1-C has always been between 6.0-7.0- until the last year. His most recent A1-C was 10.9 and I am very worried. His endocrinologist prescribed Glucophage tablets at his January 07 visit. He is a pumper (Novolog) and during the summer he chooses to get off of the pump so we give him Lantus(basal) and he uses the Novolog flexpen when he eats.
hi i have type 1 diabetes ,i have pain in my feet all the time and i sweat real bad through the night.my readings are all over the place all the time,im hypo unaware but also have symptoms of being high when im low.Im doing everything right but dont understand why my diabetes is so out of control n why the sweating at nights?please help.
MedHelp Health Answers