Tooth crown margin

Common Questions and Answers about Tooth crown margin

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The crown placed on the tooth would then have a margin that is higher on the distal side and goes down diagonally towards the mesial. Is this commonly done? Are there major downsides to having such a margin?
I do'nt quite understand your question. The crown margin is supposed to seat on sound tooth structure in stead of filling material.
It looks to me that the first photo does indeed have an open margin at the time. Did the doctor adjust the crown after the initial x-ray? It may have fit better after it was cemented in. Also, its not as obvious on the other photos either because of the adjustments that were made or because of the angulation of the x-ray.
Two months ago I decided to have a 15 year old crown on my front tooth replaced with a new porcelain crown. On my second visit to the dentist, the crown arrived from the lab way too short with a bumpy surface and incorrect color. I went to the lab where they patched it up and painted it right there in front of me. It appeared to be alright.
If you feel crown moving, it's probably the crown is not well fitted or the whole tooth is moving. If your dentist can not solve your problem, you may need to see another dentist.
I just got back from the dentist. I had a temporary crown on my upper right tooth that caused me pain a certain way I'd brush. It would ache for a few minutes afterward and then go away. Was a little sensitive when I'd bite down too hard but other than that it didn't bother me. I just had my permanent crown put on which was very painful. I told the dentist about the pain when I brushed and he did some poking around, asking me whether this or that hurt which in one place it did.
Over time I noticed a darkness around the margin of the crown and in the gum above the crown. I want to get the crown redone to a all ceramic crown to get rid of the darkness. Is it a good idea? The crown I have now is completely sound and cavity free. The endo looks fine too. Would just changing the crown to all ceramic make the darkness go away? Or will the post need to be changed too? I'm afraid of the worst, ie like the root fracturing.
If the tooth presents a cosmetic concern then I think the margin of the crown should be placed 1/2 to 3/4 of a millimeter below the gum. There are crowns today made out of a very strong material(Zirconium) which extremely cosmetic and kind to the tissue.(Procera) I would ask your dentist about it.
Hi I just had a crown on 6 lower molar, I have notice the crown does not fit on the outside surface down to the gum line and I see the metal line under the white surface, the margin line is very noticeable and I can see my tooth under the crown. I am concerned about problems this may cause.
Also can a gold crown be placed well above gingival margin, say 3 mm above? I want to save as much original tooth structure And want to avoid subgingival margin. Is crownlay an option ?
I then had crown lenghtening surgery in the same upper back area as I had develped a deep pocket (I was told there was not enough margin from gum to tooth from the original crown placement) After several months of healing, I had the permanant crown placed on the two back upper teeth. The very last back tooth seems to be fine. The second to last tooth has been sensitive since the temporary crown was placed. Its been over 3 months and it is still sensitive to the touch and when I chew.
you could have a recurring abcess in the tooth, or the crown may be impinging on the gum tissue becasue the edges of the crown were buried too far underneath the gumline. or it may be as simple as some extra cement that needs to be removed.
Tooth#18 occlusion needs to be adjusted optimally,otherwise tooth#19 would be very difficult to achieve optimal occlusion. Removal of tooth#19 crown is advised. Leave tooth #19 out of occlusion for a week.If tooth #19 is still problematic, other sources of dental pain need to be investigated. Occlusion certainly plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many mysterious pain, but not always the sole factor. I believe your prosthodontist is competent enough to manage your occlusal problem.
My tooth #3 is badly decayed on the mesial side. It will likely need RCT and a crown (it currently has a temp. filling). Most of the tooth mesial of the pulp chamber is gone, and the decay goes down to the gum (there's maybe 1-1.5 mm of tooth left to the bone). The distal side also has some decay but not anywhere near as much and there is plenty of tooth above the gum on that side.
my problem is there is a visible margin on the back where the crown meets the gum (or in this case doesnt meet the gum). it also feels like theres a slight ledge where the crown meets the tooth. it feels huge when prodding with my tongue but on visual examination its quite small. i know people who have had an overganging crown between their teeth which made it difficult to floss bet that is not the case here.
I have a temporary crown and it looks like there is blood around the gum line. Yesterday I bit on something hard and I couldn't eat it due to the pain. When I looked at the tooth there was blood around the margin, however, it was not bleeding out into my mounth, so I don't know how old the blood was. It has been hurting since I got the temp, but it got worse when I bit on it. Please advise. Thank you.
I told him I think the crown just did not fit properly, that it should cover the entire tooth. The back part of the crown covers the entire tooth and I have no sensitivity or pain there. I think they just do not want to admit the crown is too small in the front exposing the root of the tooth and they do not want lose money having to replace the crown.
In addition, proper contour and smoothness of crown margin need to be established.
My dentist trimmed the temporary to relieve this but the tissue is still inflamed and swollen. Is it normal after a crown prep to be in such pain and when will it subside? (I was led to believe this would not be so traumatic)? Can I expect more of the same for the bottom teeth? (I have lost some of my zeal to continue this procedure) Am I possibly having a reaction to the temporaries?
Its possible that with some gum recession, the margin of the crown where it meets the tooth is showing instead of hiding underneath the gumline. As for the soreness, I can only guess why. Perhaps the crown is too tight and your flossing harder up there to get it in, there could possibly be a little cement left that's irrigating the gums, the gums have receded (as mentioned earlier) and food may be getting stuck in there more easily and causing an irritation, etc.
If you have an open margin on a crown it will continue to decay. The tooth is most likely hurting due to the trauma of the drilling you may also end up having a root canal. Please change Dentist.
well the possibilities of it being ill fitting could be the problem. we dont know how extensive the work was. did the margin (area where the crown ends) extend below the gums? one thing to do is massage the tissues with your toothbrush. rinse with salt water. keep the area very clean and if by monday it doesnt feel better call your dentist. if the temporary cement extended outside the crown it could also be very irritating to the tissues.
No, I mean without the temporary, the gums will grow onto the tooth where the margin of the crown will sit on. This will result in more difficult getting a good fit for the crown and a seal to prevent bacteria from entering. I'm not sure what you're referring to about years. It grows back in days.
remember--- root canal specilaists do root canals. i would see another general dentist (based on a good referral from a trusted friend) before i saw a root canal specialist. or you can do both, but do not let them start a root canal till you get another opinion from a general dentist who does alot of crown and bridge. "Ill fitting" could mean a slew of things from poor margin (edge) adaptation to a crown that simply does not fit well on the tooth....maybe the lab did a poor job.
Hm. Drilling it off is what I do usually. I prefer to drill only because I'm alway afraid of fracturing or damaging the tooth underneath when I'm trying to pry it off or "tap" it off with a crown tapper device. Each doctor, of course, has their own preference and what they're more comfortable and skilled with. There aren't too many ways to remove a crown, it may pop off on its own.
It never happened in my practice for the past 20+ years practice. Gum problem after crown delivery is generally caused by ill-fitting margin and overcontoured crown. Allergic reaction is highly unlikely. Seeing a periodontist will reveal the cause of gum problem. The bite from a lab is almost always different from that of in the mouth. Therefore, occlusal adjustment in the mouth is always needed. Detection of occlusal interference of a new restoration requires masterful skill.
my gums are swollen and sore. and the teeth where I just got my rooth canal the gums are swollen around the crown and my mouth is just sore. What is this. I'm do everything i can to save my teeth. What more can i do? please help me!!
In thies condition, meticulous probing generally can detect decay around the margin of crown. If the tooth is mobile, it probably results from occlusal trauma, x-ray exam may reveal widening of periodontal ligament. Seeing a competent and experienced dentist is advised.
But the problem was the tooth with the crown. Now I have had both teeth pulled because root canal crown came off and was infected and the problem was the tooth with the crown. have your dentist x-ray before deciding to pull teeth.
it sounds like the crown. it could be that the crown has a margin (edge) that is open (not flush up against the tooth) or too thick (which can irritate the gum tissue), or poorly contoured (can also irritate the gum tissue) or it could be that the edge of the crown extends too far under the gum line, which can also cause gum irritation. in any of the first 3 scenarios, the crown should be redone, as these are correctable scenarios with a proper fitting/properly contoured crown.
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