Throat cancer related to hpv

Common Questions and Answers about Throat cancer related to hpv

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I told him about my symptoms (that they seemed to be a bit better, and seemed worse in the AM). He stayed the course. I didn't tell him about my fears of HPV related cancer. I'd of had to disclose my background, and I was nervous about doing so. I've learned to be more careful about disclosing my sexual orientation in this kind of environment, based on some unfortunate events with health professionals in the past. So, my question.
I have been reading that HPV is linked to throat cancer, so i am EXTREMELY worried and anxious!! I am going to the doctor next week. My questions are.... 1. My GYN told me I was now immune to the strain of HPV i have, even though I may be immune could i still get warts? 2. I thought low risk strains caused warts and high risk strains caused cancer. I had both warts and dysplasia....Is there a strain that can cause both? or do i have 2 strains? 3.
There are not good data about how common HPV is in the throat or its natural history. We do know that some throat cancers are related to HPV. In most such people they are not only related to HPV but also to tobacco use (smoking or in particular, chewing tobacco) or very heavy alcohol use as well. These two co-factors interact to greatly increase cancer risk.
Handsfield, I know with the recent news regarding Michael Douglas, you've been inundated with inquiries and I thank you for taking the time to answer as many questions as you do. I actually posted a question about HPV and throat cancer over a year ago and was grateful for the thoughtful and informative response you provided. I am a 31 year old male who has had numerous partners (about 20 - both male and female), where oral sex was involved.
It could be a lot of things and may not be related to oral sex. Best to get it checked out. 4. Throat or cervical cancer takes years to develop. I wouldn't worry about surgery at this point. The oral problem is probably something else so I would go to a doctor for that to see why your lymph nodes are swollen. hope this helps.
Almost all cases occur in people older than you (generally age 40 to 50 or more). Your risk for HPV related throat cancer is very low, and if it ever were to happen, it's likely many years in the future. 3) I cannot comment. I have no idea how long Mr. Douglas had his cancer before it was diagnosed. 4) HPV is rarely if ever transmitted from mouth to genitals. You are no more at risk for having HPV, either genital or oral, than most sexually active men.
How long does HPV cancer generally take to progress/spread? Could it potentially spread from the throat area to the hard palate region? These will be my last questions and I am truly grateful for your time.
Oral HPV is eight times more common in individuals who reported ever having sex and one in five individuals with 20 or more lifetime partners is infected, according to the JAMA study. HPV-related cancer targets the oropharynx region, which includes the back of the throat, the base of the tongue, the soft palate and the tonsils.
While some adults do get laryngeal HPV-related papillomas, the relationship and risk as it related to oral sex is vanishingly rare. You estimate of less than 1 in 30,000 is likely in the right ball park and if anything, is lower. 2. Dr. Handsfield has recently addressed this questions very well. I will just paste a slightly modified version of his answer in here. "As far as oral sex, HPV, and oral cancer, just forget it. HPV is infrequently transmitted by oral sex.
odds are this isn't remotely std related at all. you need to follow up on this with your doctor this week. odds are it's either irritation from a post nasal drip or due to allergies more than anything else. sometimes chronic GERD can cause it too. can you contract hpv orally? yes you can. thankfully for the vast majority of people, it never progresses to any obvious disease/cancer.
Those who had evidence of prior oral HPV infection had a 32-fold increased risk of throat cancer. HPV16 - one of the most common cancer-causing strains of the virus - was present in the tumours of 72% of cancer patients in the study. Risk factors There was no added risk for people infected with HPV who also smoked and drank alcohol, suggesting the virus itself is driving the risk of the cancer.
Furthermore, it is not at all certain that those people who have oral cancers related to HPV acquired their oral HPV through oral sex. That you performed oral sex on a woman who has HPV should not concern you and should not constrain your sex life. As you know, other than regular dental care (dentists do look for oral cancers) and, perhaps taking the HPV vaccine, you should not be concerned about the possibility of oral HPV, its diagnosis or its therapy.
I would say not to worry about oral hpv, the main reason being the high-risk strains those live on genital areas do not like the oral enviornment and they do not survive well in there... Further, the throat cancer due to hpv is extremely low to rare and hpv is not the major cause of throat cancer but it can be a causitive factor... the tobacco use is the major cause of throat cancer...
Doc - Just one brief follow up which I think is not much to ask for 20 bucks - If you are going to use all women who have ever had HPV-16 wouldnt you then have to calculate based on all the men that have ever had HPV related throat cancer - and not just the 6000 that get it a year? So wouldnt the numbers end up being the same?
a psoriasis issue in the genital area could make you more likely to contract hpv. does your wife have obvious warts or a + hpv dna result from a pap test?
cancer, but that's a broad category and really only one type, cancer of the throat, actually is related to HPV-16 and on the rise. But the bottom line is that the risks of cancer are extremely small. Despite the apparent rising rate, it remains a rare cancer (currently somewhere around 10,000 cases per year in the entire United States -- a tiny drop in the bucket compared with breast, colon, lung, and other truly common malignancies.
Many of the articles and studies done on throat cancer due to HPV seem to implicate oral sex as a major risk factor. I began to get worried about my risk factors after reading so many articles and thinking about my sexual past. I have only had a sexual relationship with one girl, around 6 years ago when I was still a teenager.
) All people should have regular dental check-ups, and with the increasing knowledge about HPV and throat cancer, most dentists know what to look for to diagnose early cancer lesions -- and at early stages, most of these malignancies are easily treated. In fact, current research suggests that HPV-related throat cancer responds better to treatment than non-HPV-associated cancers.
testing earlier results in a significant number of false negatives hence why we recommend what we do here. no reason to think your throat issues are std related. No reason to think they are hpv related either. Oral hpv typically presents differently and not on the tonsilar region. throat cancer at your age is also very low risk and not likely. definitely follow up with the ENT specialist if things aren't better by next week.
This probably would irritate the lining of your mouth and throat, but this would have NOTHING to do with cancer or anything serious. He probably shouldn't be doing this so forcefully and you should probably let him know that.
I think I remember reading that there were like 4000 deaths or new cases of oral cancer last year related to HPV. That is ridiculously low considering how much oral sex is going on and has gone on in the last fifty years. If indeed this was a cancer to live in fear of, you'd have to have an incredibly much larger proportion of incidence. I've had over 20 partners and extensively performed oral sex on all of them. I have no such fears of oral cancer.
Dear Doctor, What is the real statistics for oral cancer due to HPV? I just read a study where it said 60% of oropharyngeal cancers were due to HPV. Isn't that contradictory to what this website has been saying? What is the real risk and real incidence of oral cancer due to HPV? Is it really more common now to get oral cancer from HPV than from chewing tobacco or alchohol? Please put this into perspective for me. Thanks, Doc.
If you die of cancer someday, the odds are hundreds of times greater it will be one of the common ones, like colon, prostate, lymphoma, lung, etc, etc -- and not one of the very rare ones like HPV related throat cancer. So my advice is to keep things in perspective. Worry about and work to prevent life's real risks, not the ones that have 1 chance in a million. That should end this thread. Take care.
No, probably not. But for the reasons already discussed, HPV related throat cancer is not something you should be worried about. Please re-read my responses above and concentrate on everything I said. That is all for this thread. I will have no further comments or advice.
HPV can be related to cervical cancer but certainly not bone cancer.
We have had oral sex in the past, although not often, Since Micheal Douglas was diagnosed with throat cancer with a likely cause of oral sex, she has refused to give or receive oral sex. Given the fact that we both are HPV positive, what is the likely hood that oral sex between us would lead to oral cancers in either one of us? This discussion is related to <a href="/posts/STDs/Wife-has-hpv/show/249487">Wife has hpv</a>.
I have read and seen a ton of articles of late on the front page of CNN, Fox, you name it saying that HPV is the main cause of oral cancer now, surpassing tobacco, but survival rates are higher for HPV than tobacco and alcohol. The main area of cancer seems to be the middle throat. So I am a healthy, fit, 33 year old male. I am currently single, and I have done STD screenings at physicals with all clear results.
Regardless of your oral sex history and likely oral exposure to HPV, you are far more likely to get prostate, colon, lung, and other cancers -- even relatively uncommon cancers like leukemia and pancreatic cancer are far more frequent than HPV-16-related pharyngeal cancer. As to whether some sort of screening should be recommended remains a work in progress. There is no standard screening method, other than examination during routine health and dental visits.
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