Stroke volume for normal resting heart

Common Questions and Answers about Stroke volume for normal resting heart

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I am a healthy, fit, and very active 47 year old woman--healthy lifestyle and diet, runner, and I ride my bike for transportation. Resting HR of 52. PACs started a few weeks ago, so got a Holtor which reported over 4000 PACs/24 hours (that was half of what they had been previously), sleeping HR went as low as 41. Had an echocardiogram the other day, and everything was normal, except: "severely increased left atrial volume." Mysteriously, left atrial *size* (i.e., diameter) was normal.
Heart rates, particularly during and after exercise, though, are also highly sensitive to a person’s hydration and nutrition status. Dehydration represents a state of diminished water supply in your body. Because circulating blood is composed of approximately 83 percent water, dehydration effectively lowers the amount of blood that your heart is able to circulate with one beat, or contraction. Your heart compensates for this low "water" volume by beating more times per minute.
EF is a compensating factor and helps maintain a balancing flow of blood between the right and left side of the heart. Stroke volume is inverse to the heart rate. Slow heart rate the greater the stroke volume which indicates the heart rate is also a compensating factor...the slower the heart rate the more time to fill. Wide pulse pressure (no medication, etc) can be the outcome of increased CO due to fitness, anxiety, hyperthyroidism, etc.
It is just not fast enough to perfuse the body. Your cardiac output is your stroke volume times your heart rate. If your stroke volume is very high, but your heart rate is too low, your CO will still be too low for your body. This has to be checked by a doctor. Let us know how it goes.
QT Interval too short for rate 11/21/2008 (3rd EKG in a row, did not get other results) RR 1018 PR 150 QRSD 100 QT/QTc 420/417 QT disp 58 P/QRS/T Axes 12/53/22 Normal ECG except for rate [Sinus Bradycardia] vent rate 58 6/25/2009 EKG Vent Rate: 74 PR 136 QRSD 108 QT/QTc 402/426 P/QRS/T Axes 63/59/34 Interpretation: Sinus Rhythm with PVC's; N
25 mmHg or less, (yours is 20 with blood pressure of 97/70) the cause may be low stroke volume, as in Congestive Heart Failure and/or shock, a serious issue. This interpretation is reinforced if the resting heart rate is relatively rapid, e.g. 100-120 (in normal sinus rhythm), reflecting increased sympathetic nervous system activity. I'd suggest taking your BP and pulse for a few days at the same time and keep a log. If they show unusual go to doctors with them, something could be going on.
Thanks for the input Ken. The only conflicating data with stroke volume being, even though I'm athletically conditioned by running, weight training, swimming, boxing etc... I still find that at rest, ie. lying on the couch and having a BPM of 50 and getting up and walking up a flight of stairs, my BPM will reach 120 within 3-4 seconds. I though an increase stroke volume will definatly result in a lower heart rate upon minimal exericse.
However, if the pulse pressure is genuinely low, it reflects a low stroke volume, which means your heart is not pumping out the amount of blood it is supposed to. This could be because of a very serious problem, such as congestive heart disorder or shock.
Everyone get a high heart rate in the beginning of exercise (and it will slow after a minute or so) because it takes time to increase the stroke volume in the heart (it takes some time for enough blood to run back, to properly fill the heart). The heart compensates by increasing the heart rate. Again, with anxiety, the effect will be stronger. It's fairly normal that the heart rate drops quickly after this, but it can also be sustained high if the anxiety gets you.
I was always told that my heart was in normal rhythm in spite of a high rate. My resting pulse is a bit lower now than prior to starting the drug but I apparently have adequate blood pressure as I am not dizzy etc. It is now about about 60 to 64. I simply cannot believe the change after so many years. I will keep using it and keep my spirits up that it will continue to control the condition as I slowly increase my training intensity. I don't want to overdo it too soon etc.
Ejection fraction (Ef) is the fraction of the end-diastolic volume that is ejected with each beat; it is stroke volume divided by end-diastolic volume. Normal in a man is 50-68%. With a given sized ventricle and its volume, and its ability to contract, I fail to see how a faster or slower heart rate will affect the volume of blood leaving the chamber. If the heart pumps faster, the volume leaving the ventricle will always be the same.
An athlete's heart muscle increases contractility strength...a resting heart rate can be less than 60 bpm. Top-level training is often associated with morphological changes in the heart, including increases in left ventricular chamber size, wall thickness, and mass. That is different from a normal dilated heart and an abnormal dilated heart (the increased size will decrease EF). You might want to average all estimated measurements, and that should be close to what is your functioning EF.
Alberto Salazar a top class marathon runner out of Portland Oregon was some what of case study of a very conditioned heart years ago when his heart rate was in the 30'ish range. Normal for comparison is 60-100 bpm I completely doubt that your heart is so conditioned to have the stroke volume of a marathon runner, who incidentaly, his backup pacemaker was the predominant pacer. He was in a junctional rhythm. As far as your weight, at age 15, I was 185cm and 57.7kg.
I agree with Jon and to give you some insight: High blood pressure is anything above 120/80. However, mild elevations beyond those numbers only slightly increase the risk of significant health problems. But generally doctors don't prescribe medication to bring down blood pressure until the systolic reaches 140 or the diastolic reaches 90. The exception is for people with diabetes or impaired kidney function, and medication for anything above 130/80.
It's usually 98 but it did go up to 101 at one time. My resting HR when I wake up in the morning is 60ish and my normal heart rate at mid-day is 80. It goes down in the 70's at night. Adderall seems to effect my HR 4-6 hours a day. It might be raising blood pressure as well (more on this in a sec). I live pretty unhealthy. I don't exercise and I eat way too much junk food. My maternal side of the family also has a history of heart disease.
If you aren't highly athletic, mid 30's is probably lower than desired. Athlete's get slower beats because their stroke volume is greater than normal. According to wikipedia (see Bradycardia article), some healthy athletes have had rates as low as 27bpm. The wiki article outlines several possible causes, but I think your intuition about age is leading you towards the most likely diagnosis.
I try to keep my activities as less as possible to reduce work load on my heart except for 30-40 minutes when I go for a walk when my pulse reaches 90-100 bpm. Otherwise it is mostly 60-70. I recently read a post on this forum which says that with EF 30-35% life expectancy can be aroung 5 years. I have already completed 3.5 years.Anything else I can do to improve or keep my EF stable?
Because of another condition I am up every 2 hr or so (bladder condition), so the nights are pretty much a 'nightmare' these days. They say heart function is normal, I have been off caffeine for 3 weeks, and they started to get better untill I had to have antibiotics for a week....back to square one! But I will stay off the caffeine, and see what happens. Crossing fingers that it will happen like last time and eventually I can have a cup of coffee again (even decaf affects me).
He also didn't want me to take any other tests since I had a stress test 2 years prior which was normal. I am now waiting to see another cardiologist for a second opinion. My normal resting heart rate is about 44/50 but never when moving.
Weight lifting is increasing the blood pressure without increasing the heart rate and stroke volume so much. For that reason, weightlifters get a hypertrophic heart. People with chronic rapid heart rate can get a dilated heart. People doing aerobic exercise like runners, will get an athletes heart, which is both slightly dilated and hypertrophied (it grows both ways). This is healthy (within reasonable limits). The other two are not.
I've had problems with tachycardia and palpitations for about 20 years ( i'm amost 50, post menopausal, normal weight). I've had several heart event monitors ( last for 2 weeks in December), holters, stress tests, echos, the works. Years ago it was "MVP";over the past several years i was told I don't have that, maybe a little reentry problem and inappropriate sinus tach, nothing life threatening.
The only way I know of to lower resting heartrate is to strengthen your heart through exercise (it improves the efficiency of your muscles including the heart and also increases the stroke volume of the heart so that you pump more blood with every beat) but I don't know how issues like age, heart disease etc affect that process.
CO is a product of blood volume per heart stroke and heart rate. The higher/better the stroke volume (weak, strong, stronger contractions) the fewer heart beats (more for weak, less for strong, least for stronger) are required to meet demand (held constant for illustration) for blood oxygen. A well-condition individual requires fewer heartbeats due to strong contractions. It is the stroke that determines EF...not the CO, as CO can vary by an increase or decrease of HR.
After one week, I go on it for 5 minutes at a low setting, but I've been stopping because my heart rate goes up to 140. Is that normal for someone who hasn't done any hard exercise for decades? I'm not that out of breath, no chest pains or anything like that, and my legs aren't that tired. But I don't know if a beginner should exercise at a high heart rate like that. My resting heart rate is around 85. I've had a stress echo cardiogram a year ago, and that came out normal.
I've had an heart echo, ekg, chest xray done by my primary doctor 3 months ago. All was normal just my heart just had a small leaky valve he didn't seemed concerned about it said it was common. Basically I'm wondering why my top number (systolic) so high but bottom is normal?? I check my Bp about 3 times daily an its usually 145- 157. It's frustrating where I'm healthy according to the doctor right now, but they seem very slow about treating this and it's been this high for half a year now.
I am not sure what possible causes are for this. I have a normal echo and normal ECG except for a little LVH I wonder what the devil is causing it I have to say that at 52 BPM I get worried, I have borderline blood pressure Any ideas ?
Hello :) 1. A "normal heart rate" simply can't be defined. We are all different, and what's normal to some people isn't normal for others. Think of it as cars with diesel or gas engines, one engine has a "normal" RPM when driving in 80 km/h on the highroad (yes, in Norway that's the speed limit, ridiculous :p) of 1800 and another 2700. But the first engine will probably stop at 4500 RPM and the other on 7000 RPM.
When there is a significant drop in CO the vessel enthelium cells sends a message to increase the blood volume (recognized and not able to distinquish if there is a serious blood loss). The system controls stroke volume by venus return. Stroke volume AND heart rate determine CO (cardiac output). I believe you may be confused by not recognizing the determinants of the venus return phenomonon. Heart rate is result of sympthetic and parasympthetic input.
An athlete's heart pumps well because it has stronger contractions. The resting heartbeat is below 60 (normal) at rest, but a 43 may be too low!? An athlete's heart is not pathological and returns to normal size with reduction of the hear's workload. The inconsistency is your heart is not pumping adequately as 40% (50 to 70 EF is normal) almost always indicates weak contractions and not strong contractions from an athlete's heart.
For a more definitive measurement a right heart catheterization is necessary because the exercise echocardiogram has limitations, namely the inability to measure left-sided filling pressures and cardiac output (stroke volume) that is in part needed for evaluation.....
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