Stroke recovery in elderly

Common Questions and Answers about Stroke recovery in elderly

stroke

I am in a similar situation as you. My dad had his stroke last May in Pennsylvania. I live in Virginia. I have 2 siblings that lime an hour away and another that lives in Indiana. We each took turns going each week for the first few months and it helped a lot. When we couldn't be there my sister and I would do alot of the research for my mom on getting more therapy etc. That way we felt like we were helping in other ways even though we couldn't be there.
In general for someone who is critically ill post-op a recovery time of 2-3 weeks in the hospital is not uncommon with sometimes an additional several weeks in a rehab unit. Regaining strength is important and may take awhile. Questions to ask his doctors: Has the type of pneumonia been isolated? Is an Infectious disease doctor (someone who specializes in the care of pneumonias) seeing him? If not could you please consult one? How is his heart functioning?
Anyone out there dealing with a loved one over 88 (my dad turns 89 this month) who suffered a massive stroke? Dad was in poor health prior to his MCA type blockage (prostate cancer metastisized into lungs, afib, back surgery, permanent bladder catheter, newly installed PEG). Has just left hospital and entered a rehab facility. Curious others thoughts on what to expect long term.
The neurosurgeon did not offer much hope for us to survive the stroke nor in her recovery. She has already beat the odds. My mom was in ICU for 3 weeks and step-down 1 week and in rehab hospital for two months now. I have come to learn the dr.'s don't like or really now prognosis on recovery because everyone recovers differently. I have been told over and over again they don't know why some gain more function than others. My mom pulled out her breathing tube which she had for 2.
Is full recovery less common after 80? My mom had TPA within 3 hours. Hospitals in Lexington KY are mediocre at best. After 2 1/2 weeks, the only improvement has been a weak squeeze in the right hand. She is unable to move her right hand or leg apart from the delayed squeeze. She spends 20 minutes in the standing box. She is unable to transfer to the bed. Her speech involves one word answers. She had her stroke on May 11th.
My nearly 84 year old mother suffered a "major" stroke 2 days ago. She has not opened her eyes, though she shows signs of awareness and can follow directions when asked. She is sleeping allot. Initially she lost movement on her left side, but it very slowly seems to be coming back. She is saying words, though they are hard to understand. She is receiving IV fluids. The doctor said they would give her another day and see if she "wakes up".
Thank you,she is much better the doctors think it's something called amyloid angyopathy,but that's more frequent in elderly people(70',80').She had a pretty bad car accident 3 months before this,it is possible to be conected to this?
I have read all the elderly care books and none deal with the very elderly stroke-damaged in a clear-cut manner. I insist on meals being attractively presented, for example. Meticulous track of fluid intake and bowel movements, for example. If the aides are not grilled on a daily basis they tend to go off in their own direction. Usually the wrong one. Every day I ausculate her lung fields, anterior and posterior four quadrants, and check dorsalis pedis pulses. This you can learn to do.
Alcohol can cause a number of problems including alcohol-tobacco toxic amblyopia, cataracts and perhaps a greater incidence of nonarteritic ischemic anterior optic neuropathy. I suspect she had something like the latter and yes it can get better like recovery from a stroke.
Am on various medications for stroke and angina, but received no advice whatsoever from our local hospital on how having a stroke would be likely to affect me. Stroke services in my part of the UK are set to cater strictly for the over 65's, and anyone younger than that has to find out anything they need by themselves.
I appreciate your concern for your aunt’s health. The most common causes of hemorrhagic stroke are hypertension, elderly age group, weakness in the artery wall in the brain and blood coagulation issues. After the acute management of the condition, stabilization of airway, breathing and circulation, the long-term therapy includes rehabilitation. Recovery is variable and hence different requirement of therapy for different patients. Care must be taken for repositioning her to avoid bedsores.
My 89-year elderly mother has lymphoma (currently in remission), atrial fibrulation, and high blood pressure. She had a stroke a week ago, and is still relatively unresponsive. She cannot speak or make any voluntary movement except to occasionally squeeze my hand in response to a question. She is on a feeding tube (core pack?) since she has no swallow reflex. After a week of no change, can we hope for any recovery or progress? The neurologist seems to be taking a wait and see attitude.
I had a stroke caused by the medication risperdal. My dr. was very negligent in giving it to me. She took me off the meds that were woking cold turkey which is a no-no as well. 1mg clonapin 3 times a day to none overnight. This alone is dangerous but to then prescibe me ridsperdal on top of that is attempted manslaughter. If I had the money I would sue them. Has anyone else had a stroke due to risperdal? It has been 6 months and I am recovering.
it can be removed after a few months if swallowing function recovers, which it often does in patients with stroke. Being in an ICU can certainly be stressful, with frequent examinations and checks the patient doesn't get much rest, it is noisy and family members can not always be around. Sometimes, patients in the hospital, particularly older patients in an ICU, can develop what is called a delirium, an alteration in their level of alertness and awareness.
ie be able to speak, hear, see and eat Thanks for your help.
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Most gains in a person's ability to function in the first 30 days after a stroke are due to spontaneous recovery. For a stroke survivor, the rehabilitation goal is to be as independent and productive as possible. That may mean improving physical abilities. Often old skills have been lost and new ones are needed. It's also important to maintain and improve a person's physical condition when possible. A person's family has a key role in rehabilitation.
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My dad, a 92 years old man residing in Athens Greece suffered a stroke of unidentified type and size (small, medium or large) on Dec.25.2011 ie, Christmas day. Despite his advanced age, he has had no other serious medical problems and his heart system has been good. He was taken to the A&E department of the local public hospital. Following his assessment, one of the worst in its kind, he was admitted in the hospital.
But before a year ago no one knew what was going on. I decided to approach the system in a positive manner and be a part of my own recovery. As it turns out (which I did not know before I recovered because I was psychotic) everyone was human. The moment I stopped getting angry about nothing being treatable and brought cogent ideas to the table (not all of which were accepted, remember its a clinician's judgment) that was when I began to be accepted as a consumer advocate.
I am wondering why I feel a vibration in my left leg. When it first started I thought it was my cell phone ringing but my phone was not in my pocket. I feel the vibration all day long and it has a pattern to it. It is a weired feeling and I can not figure out what causes this and why it will not go away. Can you tell me why I feel this?
Reglan (metoclopromadine) is a very cheap medication, unfortunately, it is also metabolized in the kidneys, so a too high dose results in toxic levels in the blood. My husband and I discovered that completely bypassing the GI tract by using reglan injections worked much better in the end. Chica didn't get the extra pyramidal side effects (extreme restlessness, shaking and trembling) from the reglan injections that she got from the oral meds.
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