Stress test results vo2 max

Common Questions and Answers about Stress test results vo2 max

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Peak VO2 (ml/kg/min) was measured at 26.6 METs at peak was measured at 7.6 Peak O2-Pulse (ml/beat) measured at 9 AT (ml/kg/min) measured at 14.
I don't think the results correlated well with running either. It estimated my VO2 max at 55, but my actual running performance predicted about 65.
Do not understand a non 12-lead stress test. Any stress test should show a beginning 12 lead stess test. Then of course watch for ekg changes such as S-T depression. Many times arrhymia will accur soon after exercise. Of course this could accur at anytime. Not taking this place of the professionals, but I have experienced, when working large muscles, in a different way than what I was use to, often tired me to no end. Short of breath, however, no palpitataions.
The Polar HRM has a Fit Test function which apparently gives a score comparable to a VO2 Max test and the day after cycling and Circuit training my score is in the "Very Good" category. I have noticed that the HR during exercise is greatly affected by alcohol use however I am very keen not to give up drinking alcohol unless absolutely necessary. The Fit Test function of the HRM confirms the negative effect of alcohol use following an evening out....
I know I don't need to workout at that level, but I enjoy it, I feel great while doing it as well. How will this be interpreted on my next stress test? I can acheive 75% very easily and never have any symptoms, even getting to 85% is no problem if I just push the intensity quicker. Thanks.
Neurocardiogenic syncope involves a neurological reflex whereby parasympathetic tone and sympathetic tone change to varying degrees to conspire to result in loss of consciousness. In layman's terms, the answer to your question is that no, blood pooling in the legs is not strictly causal of NCS (also known as vasovagal syncope). Here is a very technical journal article on classifying different types of vasovagal syncope: http://europace.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/1/66.full.
To determine if she needs a transplant, she would need an eval by a transplant center, which I would advise if I were her. They do a test called a VO2 Max, which is a cardiopulmonary stress test, where you are hooked up with a breathing thing as well as cardiac monitors and BP cuff. The transplant cutoff is usually 14, I believe. Since she is well under 35%, she really needs an ICD, (defibrillator) which has been proven to prolong life .
I did have a stress test. I don't remember my results exactly, but the doctor never told me anything was wrong with it. This was 2 years ago. My BP varies. Sometimes it would be 115/75, and sometimes it would be 90/50. And the way I feel isn't consistent with my BP. Sometimes my BP would be 115/75 and I would feel terrible, other times I would feel great. sometimes my BP is 90/50 and I feel terrible, other times I feel fine. I have never fainted, but I have felt faint many times...
I have been complaining of SOB x1 year and they did a Vo2 max (15), and a sleep study (no problems). They did a heart cath - no problems. They finally tried PFT's. All was normal, but my DLCO was 45%. They did a repeat study a week later and it showed the same. The Pulm did a HRCT and it showed the following: Finding: Heart wnl. There is increased density and thickening of the pericardium with trace fluid separating the visceral and parietal layers anteriorly.
Switching to adaptive exercise where maximal heart rate (and VO2 max) are not king really worked for me. In fact, yoga and Pilates made all the difference in my weight. (Note to the running addicts: Are you a cortisol junkie? Perhaps. Fortunately, vitamin C may buffer the rise in cortisol associated with maximal exercise.) Rhodiola is queen when cortisol is high. Rhodiola is an herb and one of the forms of ginseng, and it's the best proven botanical treatment for lowering cortisol.
I had a cardiopulmonary exercise stress test and went back for the results, I had gotten info from you re the VO2max numbers so I could try to understand what the doctor would tell me, instead the doctor said they measured the stroke volume and mine was "16" which he thought was low, what does this 16 mean, what would an average number be for a 55 year old female?
You may want to ask if it would be an option to do a cardiopulmonary stress test rather than the plain treadmill stress test. Getting your VO2 level on top of the other data and guidance on where your exercise intolerance maxes out (METs). Or that could be something you ask about having done in the future if you can't switch and get that test now.
The heart function remains perfect, the LV dilation is minimal and the VO2 max results support the fact that this physiological adaptation to exercise. Wonderful news. However, the PVCs continue, daily. They come every time with exercise, they also come at rest. I am now on some beta blockers as they cause me great anxiety. The dose is very low as I have a very low HR (low 40s), they have taken the edge off, but the sensations have not disappeared.
A PET stress test is not the same as a Thalium stress test. Thalium is usually given first because the cost of the PET is higher. PET is used to visualize the heart under stess by giving a radiolucent (shows up on xrays) chemical called Persartine (and others). This drug simulates exercise and the heart reacts as though you are experiencing a hard workout. Pictures are taken on a special xray machine in the Nuclear Medicine department.
I saw two cardiologists, did a stress test, numerous EKG's, echocardiogram, VO2 Max Test, 24 hour holter, pulmary evaluation etc... The more I though about my heart, the more aware I became! It started driving me insane and definitly ruining my life. I guess if you're toe was hurting you and it was diagnosed as nothing, it would be easier to ignore! When it comes to the heart, that's impossible. You're constantly reminded if it stops then that's the end! We'll here's the friendly advise.
Unfortunately, stress tests and electrocardiograms (ECG) are not 100% sensitive. From time to time an ECG or stress test may be normal and a person may have significant coronary artery disease. Also even if a stress test is finally deamed normal it means that a person maybe a low risk not, no risk. The heart rates you have listed above appear to be within the normal range for the activities listed.
I have had all the cardio tests run...negative, i have had tons of pulmonary test done...all normal. Except one test, a VO2 test that showed that there was an abnormality between the respiratory and cardiac functions. They are trying to send me 2 states away for a week of tests at the Jewish National hospital, but I don't think it will do any good and then we will just be out the money. isn't there a respiratory doctor out there who can help, at least try to answer our questions????
I used to go to the gym 5 times a week doing cardio, I always used a heart rate monitor and would average 80-85% max heart rate over 45 minutes and most days would exceed my theoretical maximum reaching up to 104%. For those of you into fitness, my VO2 Max is 60.
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