Stages of death liver cancer

Common Questions and Answers about Stages of death liver cancer

death

1. what are the stages of liver scirosis? 2. how fast can you get liver trasplant?
As for the final stages, it will depend on where your mother's cancer is growing. Ovca often spreads to the liver and/or the lungs, and it is the effects on these that bring closure to a life. Basically, your mother is likely to just slowly and gradually become more fatigued and weaker, and "go to bed." From there, she will likely eat less and sleep more until she simply goes.
My Husband is a very bad alchololic, chroci, the past months in 6 ,monts he had a severe cough that wouldn,t go away finally we made him see a doctor he has been hospitalized many times for drinking and still won,t stop he has to now, his lungs our filling up with water and the doctor found two spots on his liver he said he could do a ultrasound, but he didn,t think it would change anything, he gave him med where if he drinks he gets sick, hes been doing ok, with it we our treating him at home,
She had a resection a year ago and the cancer mass in the left lobe of her liver is 5.5cm. What is the average size of this side of the liver? Also what can I expect in the coming weeks. She is on morphine and in alot of pain. She can get out of bed when she needs to but is more comfortable laying flat. Not being familiar with cancer, I just need to know what signs I should look for to call my brother and sister in from out of town....before she's on her death bed.
and if allowed to get out of hand....coma and death. If you have any signs of encephalopathy, your doctor should give you a prescription for LACTULOSE. Lactulose is a liquid laxative that binds with ammonia and removes it from the body. Once you are taking Lactulose....tell your doctor of any symptoms if they re-occur.
55%-85% of persons may develop long-term infection 70 persons may develop chronic liver disease 5-20 persons may develop cirrhosis over a period of 20 to 30 years 1%-5% of persons may die from the consequences of long term infection (liver cancer or cirrhosis) Hepatitis C is a leading indication for liver transplants. so you see cancer only develops in a small %. by the way did you know that this thread was from 2003?
WHAT SYMPTOMS IS HE HAVING NOW AND HOW LONG HAVE YOU KNOWN ABOUT IT?
I have been told by my Dr. that I am in the begining stages of cirrousis of the liver do to haveing Active Hep B sence 1997. I have been on Epivir for two years plus had kemo and rads for Hodgkins cancer during the last 3 years. I am starting to feel very sick and in pain. I got a list of my CBC's and what sticks out is that my white cells are at 2.2 and dropping. The Dr. is doing nothing for me and now I am getting very ill.
Please if anybody can help me with any kind of indication of what to expect from here. Is the limb pains caused by the liver failure?
Preferability one that has a relationship with one of the liver transplant centers listed above. Especially if the hepatologist at the transplant center can do tele-hepatology, telephone medicine and palliative care in patients with advanced liver disease with you and your local gastroenterologist. http://hepatitiscnewdrugs.blogspot.com/2010/12/what-is-hepatologist-what-is.html I wish you the best.
My father is in the last stages of liver cancer. The Dr's say it is colon cancer (he beat it 7 years ago) that has moved to his liver. He is at home and is sleeping more and more. The hospice nurse said he would continue to do this and eventually fall into a coma and not wake up. We just do not want him to be in any pain. My parents have been married over 50 years, and the past few months they have been acting like teenagers. Going out on more dates, seeing movies when possible, etc...
Hi Mark, Cancer doesn't have to hurt. I know of one ovarian cancer patient who is in her 80s with Stage IV who has no pain however she does use accupunture. Ayurvedic medicines also give complete relief from pain and rejuvenate cells. Other ways to manage pain are massage, music therapy, distractions eg reading or writing, deep breathing, heat, exercise, humor and pet therapy.
I agree with Advocate. Cirrhosis in and of itself is not a death sentence. You need to be under the care of a hepatologist, and preferably one working out of a large hospital with a liver transplant center. This is not to say you will need a transplant, but those doctors have the most training and experience in dealing with serious liver disease.
Of course he went through all of the medical issues that all cirhosis patients go through such as diebetitis and Hep C and in the last couple of months liver cancer. We watched through the years as this man went from being a very vibrant man to a frail shell of what he had once been. His 15 years of cirrhosis was spent going from doctor to doctor as new symptoms would appear. He would get his stomach tapped every couple of months until he eventually had a stint put in 5 years before he died.
5-Year Survival Rate Life expectancy rates are determined in cancer by looking at the 5-year survival rate of patients diagnosed with a certain stage of cancer. The type of cancer and the stage determine the survival rates and life expectancy. Five-year survival rates, for ovarian cancers and other cancers, account for factors like unrelated causes of death, when providing the statistics on 5-year survival.
they will check the liver for a number of things not just for cirrohsis of the liver. make you a list of question to ask your doctor that is important.
When I was told I had stage 4 liver disease I asked how many stages are there. The answer was 4. Knowing absolutely nothing else it took about 30 seconds to get over the immediate shock and ask what can be done. That's where you are now. Need advice, explanations, support, or just want to vent, you've come to the right place. Many knowledgeable persons like copyman have been through it all. And it's an active forum.
Her inability to chew food may be due to an extreme lack of appetite and generalized weakness which can be seen when the cancer is quite advanced. The stages of cancer do not necessarily correlate with a severity of symptoms. Cancer staging has to do with tumor size, and the extent of spread to the nearby lymph nodes and to distant body organs.
But if you do, it is treatable in its early stages and can be cured with a liver transplant. It is not a death sentence for most patients as long as they have proper medical care at a liver transplant center. Hang in there! Hector I have hep C genotype 1 and advanced cirrhosis. I have had HCC (liver cancer) for 26 months now and had 6 cancer treatments and will have a 7th this month. I have a MELD score of 36.
Enzymes are neccessary to see liver inflammation. This is not true in all cases. Statistically, 30% of persons have normal liver enzymes despite having damage. It is not an accurate indicator on it's own. While elevated liver enzymes are a signal to look deeper at what's causing them, not everyone with liver damage has elevated enzymes. While my liver damage is early stages, I still had damage and normal enzymes.
I think the reported climb in mortality is coming from the "first wave" of identified patients. A lot of these people were dealing with long-delayed diagnosis, and a very poor response rate to the normal interferons. That's assuming that these people treated at all. Since a lot of folks were unaware of disease, they may have accelerated progression with alcohol. Personally, I believe the upward trend in mortality is temporary.
My mom is in the final stages in her battle with ovarian cancer. Cancer is spreading and she has a tumor pressing against the intestine causing a block which prevents her from taking in any fluid and food. Her oncologist says she should go home without any artifical feeding because the TPN will "feed" the tumor. To me this means we wait until she starves to death? This is all new to me and confusing. I do not understand what this really means and what to do next.
I have read many posts from people that say if untreated you wll die of complicatons of HCV. That is not true. Only 5% get liver cancer and it's hard to tell the progression of cirrohsis especially if your lifestyle is healthy. I've had HCV for 40 yrs and only stopped etoh 2009. Stage 0-1. People are different. I work in a hosptal ICU, 8 years and have seen 1 liver cancer from HCV and the patient was a heavy drinker. All the HCV patients I see in the ICU with GI bleeds, cirr.
I keep telling my wife that I know this is all completely illogical but I still can't convince myself that I don't have cancer. Unfortunately, it is affecting my life greatly. Because of the thought of my impending death from cancer I can't enjoy time with my family or concentrate on anything. All I can think about is how my 18 month old will grow up without knowing his father. I know I need help but this is he first place I have found with people with similar problems.
Then after transplant the patient will need to treat their hepatitis C which reoccurs in their donor liver to prevent development of cirrhosis and liver failure in the donor liver. 20-30% of post transplant hepatitis C patients develop cirrhosis and liver failure within 5 years after transplant. So sooner of later the hepatitis C must be cured our it will destroy any liver a person with chronic hepatitis C has.
I was also thinking...Has your Mom ever looked into a liver transplant? I know in the last stages of liver cirrocis, they offered my father a liver transplant. Even by a live donor. I also talked to my mother and she mentioned an uncle who has been diagnosed and on lactulose for some time. She also told me to mention to you, to look out for blood in vomit and what looks like coffee grounds. When this happened to him they had to go in and band the veins in his esophogus.
Especially the ones directly involved with your uncle. In the case of my father in law who was in his final days with cancer of the esophagus his hospice care takers were in direct contact with his physician and knew all the details of his condition and were able to call his doctor as needed. The hospice person maybe able to answer many of your questions. Hope some of this helps.
If someone's death is due to hep c, it is usually due to end-stage liver disease caused by advanced cirrhosis, or the presence of hcc, liver cancer. Liver disease from hep c is measured in stages -- so if you are stage 3, you should certainly be doing your best to take good care of yourself: seek out a hepatologist, educate yourself about the disease, and explore your options to prevent further liver damage.
There are several stages of cirrhosis, I doubt they will do a biopsy at this time due to the condition of his liver. The meld score is an attempt to determine the amount of time he has left. Until he can receive a transplant they can prescibe meds that will lessen his symptoms. The Enulose will reduce the ammonia levels in his blood which will help him think more clearly. Alcoholic Hepatitis is different from the Viral Hepatitis we have on this forum.
God bless you for your devotion to your sister. The end stages of liver disease are difficult to hear about- but important to know about. I'll pray for you and your sister. My pain management for neuropathic pain includes a drug called Neurontin. I don't know whether part of your sister's pain is neuropathic, but if it is, you might want to discuss it with the doc.
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