Stages of death kidney failure

Common Questions and Answers about Stages of death kidney failure

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5 years old Jack(Tri-Colour) and Sam(Sable) Both boys have recently been diagnosed with early stages of Kidney Failure. Jack's blood results are higher than Sam's I have been looking on the internet for some info on this disease to see how it progresses. I seem to be going round in circles getting no where. I am looking for some info from fellow dog owners. Jack has vets on wednesday for more blood tests....
Just today we noticed blood in his urine. This scared us since one of the possible side effects of Lasix is kidney failure. He isn't vomiting and is urinating regular and not in places he shouldn't be. We're hoping this isn't kidney failure but possibly a stone. We have been feeding him the below basic diet. Does anyone have suggestions on blood work, tests we should do, diet and so on to help strengthen the dog and reduced his intake of the below drugs or eliminate some all together?
A lot of the posts I've read described the quick downward spiral of dogs that have been diagnosed with kidney failure. Are we just lucky that it was caught in the early stages of the disease? I know that the outcome will be the same whether it takes days, months or more, but is this typical for an early diagnosis? I don't know what stage of failure she's in, but when the time comes, I'm hoping I have the courage to allow her to leave us with dignity.
BUN) will rise way too high (This lets the doctor know that something is about to go wrong----and they can step in and do something about it) The first signs of kidney trouble is rising Creatinine and BUN. Inability to urinate is a sign of kidney failure. ************ANY TROUBLE URINATING MEANS THAT YOU SHOULD GO TO THE EMERGENCY ROOM. Are you considering a liver transplant? Has your doctor spoken to you about it?
I have read many articles on the internet that will state that to die of Kidney Failure is a painless death. Some of these articles have gone so far as to call it a gentle death. I am not so sure that I would totally agree with these statements. In my opinion, when a dog is in stage 4 (the final stage) of this disease, the toxins in it's body are making it very sick.
It didn't work for my dog who died of kidney failure and the only effective alternative at the time was calcium in the form of Tums. It's very important to get phosphorus out of the body of a dog in kidney failure. While calcium binds to phosphorus and gets it out of the body, dogs in kidney failure usually already have high calcium levels. Darned if you do; darned if you don't. I tried to find the Alu Tabs but couldn't get them in here in the US at the time.
He explained that if this were a normal physical and the tests gave the same results he wouldn't be worried but because of the raisins he thinks this may be the beginning stages of kidney failure. He told me that we needed to schedule a follow up to determine if these tests were a fluke or indicative of something much worse.
Having trouble urinating is a sign of hepatorenal syndrome. (Kidney failure induced by liver failure.) Your husband needs help. As an aside---my husband has been in liver failure since August 2000. The key to keeping someone alive, is handling complications (as best you can), as they come up. The three "main" complications are : ascites, varices, and encephalopathy. If you don't try to keep those under control.....his time with you may be short.
She will probably know that she is slowly dying - and therefore, sadly, she will be suffering. There is no chance of recovery (kidney disease cannot be cured, though in the early stages, it can be controlled and slowed down), so the longer you leave things the worse she will get. The smell you talk about is probably her breath - and the smell is from the toxins building up inside her body. I hope you can muster enough strength to take her to the vet, as you have suggested, tomorrow morning.
I also had my beloved cocker of 16 years get kidney failure. From the time she was diagnosed I could not bear to think of having her put to sleep. She had helped me raise my three daughters who were 2, 5 and 6 when she came to live with us. She was like my other child and with me, often, when no one else was. I knew at the end of October the year she was diagnosed that she was very sick, but did not seem to be suffering, although her quality of life was so diminished.
He didn't want any further intervention. There are stages of CHF; have you researched the 4 stages? That may help you to figure out where your mom is at, relative to CHF.
I don't have experience with kidney failure, but I had a look in the archives here (I put "dog kidney failure diet" into the search box, and a few older posts came up. I have not had time to read them all, but this one might be helpful: http://www.medhelp.org/posts/Dogs/excessive-thirst-and-peeing-in-house/show/736354 You could check out those old posts, see if you can find anything there to help.
Sometimes when we'd ask him to squeeze my hand he would, but most of the time he did not. What I know of cirrhosis, is that it is a slow and painful death. My mother died years ago of cancer -- cirrhosis is not so very much different, is it.
Creatinine is the most influential reading, as it is more suggestive of kidney failure the higher it becomes. BUN is not necessarily kidney specific, but together with other values it points towards kidney failure. I would say this is early stage kidney failure, rather than mid-range, so probably stage 2 or 3. I think you can do a huge amount with diet to get his values down and his quality of life and life expectancy up. Have a read of my articles here: http://www.infobarrel.
They were both just 10 years old. Spike was in the final stages of renal failure. I gave him sub Q fluids for over a year. I did everything to keep him alive. Sugar, who was healthy, was so upset over her brother's illness. She understood and never left his side. One day Sugar barked at the mailman and began to scream in terrible pain! I ran to her, she was upside down and crying. She looked like she was having a heart attack. She never showed signs of heart trouble.
I was also thinking...Has your Mom ever looked into a liver transplant? I know in the last stages of liver cirrocis, they offered my father a liver transplant. Even by a live donor. I also talked to my mother and she mentioned an uncle who has been diagnosed and on lactulose for some time. She also told me to mention to you, to look out for blood in vomit and what looks like coffee grounds. When this happened to him they had to go in and band the veins in his esophogus.
Seizure activity and signs of neurological problems are common in dogs that are in the end stages of kidney failure due to the buildup of toxins in the body, so it's entirely possible that what you observed was the result of the kidney failure.
Hep C, diabetis, kidney failure and even cancer are very common with people who have cirrhosis. I lost my uncle a couple of months ago and I can say that he should have been gone years before he actually died. He basically had what I call a 15 year death. It was very difficult to watch someone go through that. His finally day was the only day he ever looked juandice. Until them it was years of having fluid drained and having one health issue after another.
org/wiki/Hepatic_encephalopathy “Hepatic encephalopathy (also known as portosystemic encephalopathy) is the occurrence of confusion, altered level of consciousness and coma as a result of liver failure. In the advanced stages it is called hepatic coma or coma hepaticum. It may ultimately lead to death.[1] It is caused by accumulation in the bloodstream of toxic substances that are normally removed by the liver.
She was 10 1/2 years old when we finally after 1 week of unbearable misery I put her down. She was diagnoised with renial kidney failure in September, 2008. She ate the Science Diet K/D wet dog food. At first she would eat 1/2 can at each feeding, plus a little bit of dry K/D 2x per day. She remained pretty stable for a year. She did go through boughts of no eating many times.
i was in stage 2 real failure last December secondary to litiem toxicity..from lack of PO...my gfr was 48 i belive...cronic kidney disease must calculate difft then end stage renal..mail me and explain this...
As we all know everything we breath in and eat goes through our livers, so, the medication he took too combat the hiv virus into an undetectable state, in the end, put the in end stages of cirrhosis. In August of 2002 he began mentally acting "different' memory problems arose, and jaundice appeared and a smell from his skin no matter how much i bathed him wouldnt go away.
Death has never crossed my mind at anytime. A friend of mine here died a couple of weeks ago from Ovca... and her death was very peaceful, and quite quick. The Hospice nurses do a wonderful job, and it's not like it was years ago apparently, so I don't think your Mum will suffer. Your Mum is way too young to go, so I'm hoping that the Gemzar will slow the cancer down, and your Mum will have more time of life with you and your family.
I posted in another forum and finally figured out I needed to also post to this user group vs. another pet forum....anyway, my dog Hurley was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease/failure in 2011 and has lately been displaying many of the obvious signs that his kidneys are starting to shut down. He has been on KD for the past three years (plus a couple months since it was earlier in the year of 2011 that he was diagnosed).
Well, let's try this again. I read some very sad stories from others who have lost or about to lose their babies to renal failure. They are in a great deal of pain from a decision they have made or about to make. Hopefully my response to them will help others. Wanted to share with all of you Sandy Grace's last hours. I have read and reread all of these sad, sad stories. My heart is breaking for all of you. We just lost our beautiful yellow lab "Sandy Grace" to kidney failure.
I don't claim to know the answer, but I have also hear Vertex use a study which suggested that if a person were to live long enough, all of us would progress to cirrhosis that would result in death. The study you quoted was based upon a 20 year infected result. The 30 year did not share that same result; it was much higher and I infer that the 40 year would be worse still. Make sense?
On April 7, 2014 he went into severe kidney failure. He was hospitalized and at the time of the blood work his BUN was 157 and I believe his Creatine was 2.4 He was hospitalized for three days, flushed out all the toxins, and had IV’s. Since then he has been on the RS recovery kidney diet, and now is on the KD diet and drinks plenty of water. He has gained weight and is pretty active. Just had blood work done and his BUN is 23 and Creatine is 1.1 The vet said all is normal.
For example, at one extreme, if the patient develops severe acid buildup in the blood, kidney failure, bleeding disorders, or coma, then death is almost certain. Only a liver transplant can possibly save such a patient.
My Mother is in the hospital diagnosed Friday with Cirrhosis of the liver and kidney failure. She is 85 and they are letting her go home tomorrow. She lives upstate NY in Watertown, and I live in Florida. I have family (brother sister and daughters) that all live up there but I need to be with her in the comfort of her own home and to be able to take care of her. I feel your pain. I suffered in 2008 when my Dad was dying with stage 5 brain tumor that was cancerous and no treatment available.
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