Stages of death in dogs

Common Questions and Answers about Stages of death in dogs

death

I am going into the vet's office on Friday for new blood work / check up. I am have read about other <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s' symptoms and I am wondering if there is any sort <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> progression with the symptoms. last visit my vet didn't give me an amount of time that he thought she would survive. Izzie goes back and forth between drinking tons of water and not wanting to drink at all. Recently she has been tremoring off and on throughout the day but does not appear to be bothered by these episodes.
I totally agree with lindapalm! I am absolutely HORRifIED to hear that a vet would say about your 12year old dog "that she is old and may have heart problems or cancer" That is not good enough. He might have been rght. But still, without testing no-one could say what was wrong with her, and the "age-ist" views of some vets I look on as stupid and a form of laziness. in my opinion most dogs are NOT "old" at age 12...not old enough to be written off anyway.
I know I'll never know 100%% for sure what happened, but it's just the sheer suddenness of it all, and her seeming so healthy, that still has me in a state of shock.
if your dog is <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> one <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> the earlier <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>stage</span>s <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> Kidney Disease, the Disease can be slowed down, and the symptoms can be managed. There are many reports of dogs surviving for several more months, to several more years. All dogs are different, and of course there are many variables involved. I have read many articles on the internet that will state that to die of Kidney Failure is a painless death. Some of these articles have gone so far as to call it a gentle death.
Prior to taking the meds, she was always happy and interested in a walk - granted always hungry, but vivacious, full <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> life. After taking trilostane, it's as if she shut done. I feel that <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> some <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s, the medicine stops their cortisol production and then somehow it triggers something else that causes them to shut down. I've read now that internal medicine veterinary specialists believe in not treating Cushing's and letting it run its course.
that day may not be here yet, but <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> time, any dog you offer a home to would be one <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> the luckiest <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the world ... and your boy would be so happy to have a new friend join the family. Again, I am so sorry for your loss. You are in good company here, so please keep coming back to let us know how you and your Maltese are feeling.
if you've never lost a pet before, you will find that you go though all the same <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>stage</span>s as with a dear human loved one. So, keep support <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> your life while you work though this loss. Medhelp is a good start. You did all you could do! It's not your fault.
those are signs <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> the last <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>stage</span>s...falling into a coma/death is next. When the kidneys shut down, there isn't going to be much peeing...except possibly for that last huge one like Joker did. Joker was still jumping onto the couch and wrapping himself around me until the end. He wanted to be held and loved...he wanted me to end his pain, make him feel better...and I couldn't. There was no magic pill. I wish I would have put him to rest much sooner.
if you all go in there, and your other dog witnesses her death, on the vet's table, it is just possible it might make HIM afraid <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> future <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> going to the vet. <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s are no way stupid. They know going <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> there they smell sickness, and nervousness, which is bad enough. They can't put two-and-two together quite the way we can. They can't think "our loved one was sick, so we went to the vet for her suffering to be ended" All he will observe is her death while at the vet's.
I know his kidneys are just shutting down and that this is the end stages, but I wanted to know if anyone has gone through this before with a dog and how long it took because I am unsure <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> when to notice if he will be <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> pain. He does not seem to be <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> any obvious pain that I can other than maybe just slower and doesn't play, etc. He is about 15 or 16 years old, but we never really knew his actual age - just always estimated.
Hi all....This is an upbeat letter to all of you who suffer the heartache & constant worry of a sick pet, and/or the loss of your precious fur baby. I watched an adorable video tonight of a tiny puppy "falling in love" with the family cat. It was mutual love. It made me think of my Poodle Julie, when she was a puppy & how lucky I am to have had the pleasure of experiencing her adorable, fun & loving life, , from a puppy to now, at 10 yrs. old.
Posted by Sandra_G, Nov 07, 2009 Hi all....This is an upbeat letter to all of you who suffer the heartache & constant worry of a sick pet, and/or the loss of your precious fur baby. I watched an adorable video tonight of a tiny puppy "falling in love" with the family cat. It was mutual love.
8 mg/dL) together with BUN and Creatinine, an abnormal phosphorus level is the primary diagnostic indicator of chronic kidney failure <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s. Most (85%) <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> phosphorus is stored <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> bones, but a small amount circulates <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> blood as phosphate ion. The latter is crucial for nerve function and muscle contraction. A dog’s kidneys control the level of phosphorus circulating in the blood and prevent the level from rising too high.
Coughing in chf has nothing to do w/'coughing' (like what humans use for coughs), it has to do w/her heart's congestion. Both my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s are old and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> mid-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>stage</span>s <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> chf where coughing is minimal. if your vet doesn't know what this excessive coughing is in relation to chf dump her quick. There are few dvm's who are heart specialists but the one I took my dogs to put them on furosemide (lasix/waterpills), enalapril and Vetmedin.
All the pain, grief and sorrow will subside within it's time, but it will be necessary for you to experience the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>stage</span>s <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> the grief process <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> order to heal and it will be very difficult. Right now, take time to just think and heal and everything will fall into place one day at a time.
in other words no heroics. And an accurate assessment <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> level <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> consciousness may be skewed <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the presence <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> drugs used to make the person comfortable. however, there is validity to the premise that pain will actually keep you alive longer, and it's always an ongoing challenge to find the balance of pain and/or anxiety control.
I know this might sound gross to some but it is a way to make things still have some kind <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> since <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> humor. I know this is going to just kill me but I always think <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> others that have had things so much more difficult through out there lives. I think of the ones who have lost their child or children..That to me has got to be the worse pain in the World.
I lost my momma, my very best friend and my everything on March 5th of this year. I am a 30 year old, single woman with no children, no siblings, and no other family (to mention anyway). My mom was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the lungs in May of 2007 & I moved in with her. My biggest fear was always loosing my mom & like most people, I never dreamed my nightmare would become a reality. My mom and I were so close, and now I feel so alone in this big 'ol world.
It was a pain for him and a pain for me to get him there (in my jammmies) so we both kind <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> just chilled <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the great room. Hubby fed my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s and horses all wiinter, a good friend cleaned my kennel runs once this winter, which helped,I did his more than a few times and helped too many friends out that didn;t help, but that is over. You sound like you can & will get thru this!!!!
He was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> the spleen and had it removed <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> emergency surgery <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> August 2007. I took him through chemo and he survived 6 months following the surgery. On his last day, he was rebounding following a traumatic night a few days earlier vomiting and collapsing. He couldn't get up the next day but was more responsive the following. Although fatigued, he could walk the day after that and even began playing with his toys. So he was recovering.
A lot of the posts I've read described the quick downward spiral of dogs that have been diagnosed with kidney failure. Are we just lucky that it was caught <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the early <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>stage</span>s <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> the disease? I know that the outcome will be the same whether it takes days, months or more, but is this typical for an early diagnosis? I don't know what stage of failure she's in, but when the time comes, I'm hoping I have the courage to allow her to leave us with dignity.
BUN levels can be reduced by restricting the intake <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> protein (hence the useful impact <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> renal specific dog food for chronic kidney failure <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dog</span>s) and by increasing the intake of fluids (the administration of IV fluids is particularly effective). What this means is you need to pay close attention to diet - and maintain the fluids.
A strong woman isn't afraid <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> anything… But a woman <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> strength shows courage <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the midst <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> fear. A strong woman won't let anyone get the better of her… But a woman of strength gives the best of herself to everyone. A strong woman makes mistakes and avoids the same in the future… A woman of strength realizes life's mistakes can also be unexpected blessings and capitalizes on them. A strong woman wears a look of confidence on her face… But a woman of strength wears grace.
A strong woman isn't afraid <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> anything… But a woman <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> strength shows courage <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the midst <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> fear. A strong woman won't let anyone get the better of her… But a woman of strength gives the best of herself to everyone. A strong woman makes mistakes and avoids the same in the future… A woman of strength realizes life's mistakes can also be unexpected blessings and capitalizes on them. A strong woman wears a look of confidence on her face… But a woman of strength wears grace.
I am a physician assistant myself and was working <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> a small rural clinic <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the panhandle <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> Texas at the time (I had just recently went to indiana and Oklahoma too) but in 2005 I had within a short period 2 ticks at separate times on my neck I pulled off eventually. One developed the classic bullseye rash and my nurse had pointed it out to me. I don't recall any specific symptoms at the time, but I had a very severe flu that year and I don't recall when as related to the tick bites.
Benadryl is also something of an anti-emetic, and can be given at 1 mg per pound <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> the dog's weight, but I doubt it will be very effective <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> the face <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> this kind <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> vomiting. Worth a try though. Another thing that helps is calcium - lots of it. I was giving Chica 2 Tums a day during her last couple of months. The calcium binds to phosphorus which is deadly to those in renal failure.
They would go away from us and find places <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> comfort while dealing with death. I'm still <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> mourning for the lost <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> our last dog. however, we have let him go and he is in a better place now. if you feel that any of this helps...well I hope it does. As a caring animal lover...it's hard to make any decision when your beloved animal gets sick....I will pray for your decision and hope things will work out for the best. As for our family...
You can find a short version of my story on this board <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> another thread. You may be <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> for the battle <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> your life... your son is crying out for help but has lost his belief that he can win. Right now he needs his family even though he may do things to alienate them. I do agree with the friends here who are advising you to go to alanon or naranon.... do it... but remember.... they may eventually tell you to give him to God.. to let him into the street to hit bottom. Remember..
30, back to bed, and after a lot <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> thrashing about, holy <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> holies I sleep for 3 hrs, wake up and dressing gown is drenched <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>in</span> sweat, back to bed get another 1hrs sleep, then up at 07:30. It's now Monday. Monday 0945.Am feeling a bit better now, go see boss at work to explain ( goes ok ). then have a drive round, I find I am noticing things I took for granted before, things are in much sharper focus. Although I had real bad stomach cramps, the Flu like symtoms have all but gone.
Anger is one <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> those <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>stage</span>s. You are not worthless - none <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>of</span> us are. I'd like to believe that we all have a lot to give yet - regardless if we are able to be "productive" in the terms of earning a living wage. I agree, our animals get better treatment. They are seen as poor helpless creatures - and that's great, I love them too - though not a one of them (except the very few) have ever earned a penny - or paid a penny into our government. Yet none are purposely left to suffer.