Signs of heart attack in dog

Common Questions and Answers about Signs of heart attack in dog

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Since I assume that a post-mortem has not been performed, than, your dog may have had a congenital abnormality (malformation) of the heart, or vessels of the heart that was not compatible with long life. This would have been difficult or impossible to foresee, especially since it sounds as if the problem had no warning signs, i.e.: prior episodes of sudden shortness of breath, or acute collapse/fainting episodes, or heart murmur.
Less raw was fed and more grains and cereals were introduced into our pet's diet. Initially dry dog foods either came in a form of a biscuit or a pellet. In the 1950's Purina invented the extrusion process. They created a kibble that was larger in size, but lighter in weight giving the appearance that you were getting more for less (the start of the deception they give their consumers). The sales of processed foods opened the doors for mill operators and dealers.
My dog was diagnosed with an enlarged heart a few months ago. She got heart medication and that helped with the coughing, but recently she has been more lethargic than usual. She woke me up at 4 am today for no reason, and I noticed that she was having some trouble breathing and her heart was beating so, so fast. Are these signs of a "heart attack?" If not, how will I know when she is about to pass?
Not so with a dog. The dog takes signs of affection as re-inforcement of behaviour patterns. The affection is saying, in dog-language "Yes, you're a good dog for feeling this way. I will cuddle you, affirming your emotion, to make you feel even more of the same way" The best time to give a dog affection is when it is in a relaxed, normal, contented, or submissive (in a positive way) state.
I look around, and all I see are signs of the times coming. I see in my own family the attacks that we are under by the enemy. Cancer,eveil spirits, what ever the enemy can throw at this family he has. Praise GOD there are many prayers warriors in our family. I am going to give some examples, and i would like your honest opinions, if you think it is attack by the enemy or just everyday life,.In May my cousin and her huswband were ordained, and they are planting a church in Ithaca MI.
I just calmed myself down...and I'm really finding comfort in hearing other people's stories of coping with the same thing. My dog was like family... I treated him like family.... And we took him everywhere, all our trips had to be road trips because we couldn't bear leaving him by himself at someone else's house... You see, He had a separation anxiety... He would sit by this couch near the window and watch outside until we came home and jump down from the couch to greet us.
We didn't notice anything wrong with our dog and stepped over him like we normally do when he's sleeping. There were no signs of death at the time. We were in my room for 5 or 10 minutes. Mom left to go into the kitchen to get some water and noticed our dog was laying oddly with his back legs sprawled out like his front paws which was pretty unusual. My father looked at him and told my mother our dog was dead after noticing feces and vomit on the floor.
I actually thought at first she was having an epileptic seizure as the first signs of it seemed like that (my 3rd dog has those so I know what those are like when you see them). While Lucy didn't have epilepsy, dogs have been known to develop it later in life, so I thought that was it, until I saw her stagger into the middle of the yard and just collapse.
She is extremely skittish now when we do get home from work. I am wondering if she is having a panic attack or some type of seizure. Any insight is appreciated.
His white cell count was elevated but not to any extent to raise alarm. Yesterday, he showed some signs of improvement in the morning. As the day went on he took a sudden turn for worse and couldn't drink when water was brought to him. My husband took him to the vet right away and within an hour he had gone in to cardiac arrest and died. Unsuccessful attempts were made to revive him. I was advised no way to know what happened without a necropsy.
But how can we stop it before it gets worse?
With no other signs or symptoms, and no real history of illness a sudden death like that could have been a heart attack. But of course I can't really say. The only way to find out for certain what she died of would be to have the vet perform a necropsy. But if you're anything like me, you probably won't want to do that, and to leave her in peace instead, even though there are still the unanswered questions. What a horrid shock for you. I am deeply sorry.
i have had those crazy palpitations, skipped heart beats, flutters, pauses in the rhythm and then that pounding of the heartbeat since i was 18 or so....at least thats what i remember. it could've been since i was much younger and i just never knew i had it. anyhow, i am 43 now so i've had it for at least 25 years. it came and went over the years.
It is difficult of course to say what happened but statistically speaking, sudden death in a senior dog is most commonly a heart attack. In your case however, the symptoms you are describing, and with your dog being part shepherd I worry about a tumor on the spleen known as a hemangiosarcoma. These tumors can develop and not show any signs for months and then one day they rupture and internal bleeding occurs. Often the dog then passes away from internal blood loss within 12 hours.
hi , wednesday morning i let my 2 dogs out as usual only to notice my dog sasha gsx on the floor i called her and she made it back to me but seemed drunk as she walked then sunk to the floor and lay motionless on the step i called my daughter and tried to get the out of hours vet but my daughter checked sasha's gums which were blue and said she had gone it was no more than 10 mins from the time she colapsed to her passing but i still dont no why this happened so suddenly , she had a major op
Benadryl is also something of an anti-emetic, and can be given at 1 mg per pound of the dog's weight, but I doubt it will be very effective in the face of this kind of vomiting. Worth a try though. Another thing that helps is calcium - lots of it. I was giving Chica 2 Tums a day during her last couple of months. The calcium binds to phosphorus which is deadly to those in renal failure.
The cat was on his back screaming and in panic as the dog was nudging him with nose. This dog is a stray who gets fed by everyone in the neighborhood and is usually not aggressive. I live in a small country town so it is not unusual for a dog to live loose. This dog has been around for as long as I can remember, at least 7 years. Someone got her fixed and she just roams. She's in really good health for being a stray country dog. I have been feeding this cat for awhile now. We have approx.
His gums are pink and everything else seems fine. Are these signs (shaking, undereating, shallow breathing, change in typical behavior) of a jealous dog? If they are, how can we stop this? I don't want him to be this upset, but the other dog isn't going anywhere either. Duke can be very agressive around other males and is pretty territorial. If he's still acting like this, he's going to the vet on Monday (none are open right now and none are open on Sunday's either :/).
I have to have her on special prescription dog food due to kidney stones so don't have a lot of options. I talked to the vet and got the same prescription dog food only in canned. The first couple of days she ate this good and did not throw up as long as I kept the portions down to a couple of tablespoons. Now the last 2 days she is not even eating this. I have tried crumbling a couple of potatoe chips (her favorite) and mixing this in with no luck. she still does not eat.
Didn't sound like it. Always hard to lose them. So sorry.
There could have been underlying health or organ issues you just were not aware of. It could have been a heart attack or stroke possibly. I had a relatively young Sheltie years ago that was fine when I left for work. Ate her breakfast, jumping around, no indication anything was amiss. Came home to find her down and in shock. Rushed her to the Vet but she passed. I did have a necropsy done and she had a tumor that ruptured. The Vet and I were both surprised.
My dog occasionally does not eat much for days at a time, especially if it is hot. I know this of my dog so it does not alarm me. And if he runs around like a maniac or does not chew his food all the way he will also on occasion throw up. My point is that he could truly be ill but I could just be thinking that he is being him. What happened to your dog could happen to mine as well. You said that Coco was drinking water so I would not have been to alarmed either.
' We can all relax - we can all rest - because it was none of those things' (I thought Kirby had died of a heart attack). The only organ to be affected was her liver which was distressed, but her lungs were clear and there was no distension and no torsion' (All I can say is that the distension must have gone down because her abdomen was definitely blown up and hard from the cortisone - (which the vet had CONFIRMED to me was a normal side effect from cortisone).
Well tiredness can be associated with fatigue and according to a trial in California University, statins seem to affect energy levels of Women. In a trial 40% of the women noted fatigue. Of course statins may not be in use with the poster.
200 ounces per pound of body weight. It takes 250 pounds of white chocolate to cause signs of poisoning in a 20-pound dog, 125 pounds for a 10-pound dog. Milk chocolate: 1 ounce per pound of body weight. Approximately one pound of milk chocolate is poisonous to a 20-pound dog; one-half pound for a 10-pound dog. The average chocolate bar contains 2 to 3 ounces of milk chocolate. It would take 2-3 candy bars to poison a 10 pound dog. Semi-sweet chocolate has a similar toxic level.
It wasn't the stereotype of what we expect to experience when we think of 'heart attack.' I was diagnosed with Acute MI due to the blockage(s) and subsequently had a triple bypass. Five months later I had the ICD implanted due to an ejection fraction (EF) of 35%. EF is an estimate of how much fluid (volume) your heart pumps out when it beats. A normal EF is considered to be 55% to 75%. Think of the heart muscle contracting and pumping out the blood. It's never going to be at 100%.
The second type is Hemorrhagic stroke wherein bleeding occurs in the brain of the dog. Find out from your vet, as to which of the two strokes affected your dog and reason why it occurred A CT scan or an MRI will need to be conducted to check the extent of brain damage which has occurred as well as for any presence of any tumor Get the dog examined for diseases, once again through certain blood tests.
Julie had another Pancreatitis attack...she had diarreah & vomiting. I was prepared this time...I was scared but it was either me treating her or the ER Vet for 4 days again. I came to terms with my decision to treat her at home. I called my Vet & he said to give her the Flagyl that he gave me 2 wks. ago...just in case this attack happened again. I did & It worked after 1 day but I kept her on it all week.
He knows you always only wanted to do the best you could for him, and you did. He died in the safety and comfort of your husbands arms. He was a lucky dog to spend his 12 years in the company of people who love him. Please accept my heartfelt sympathy... God Bless Enzo's Beautiful Spirit and Soul ......He is much loved.
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