Seizure vasovagal syncope

Common Questions and Answers about Seizure vasovagal syncope

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Could you tell me why this may be happening, are my symptoms indicative of vasovagal syncope, and do the symptoms become more apparent as a person ages? I have no health insurance and would like to eliminate any further tests that might not be appropriate given my symptoms. Any information you may be able to share would be greatfully appreciated!
Hi, You should consult a neurologist and get him evaluated and rule out other causes before coming to the diagnosis of a vasovagal syncope. Does he have any vomiting, involuntary micturition, tongue bite, etc? You should talk to the neurologist about getting a CT scan of the brain, an EEG done to find out the cause of his symptoms. Is his blood pressure and blood sugar in the normal range? Let us know about what the neurologist advises and post us about how he is doing. Regards.
What is Vasovagal Syncope? Vasovagal syncope is not a serious or life threatening condition, but in effect an abnormal reflex. This results in a drop in blood pressure leading to decreased blood flow to the brain resulting in dizziness or fainting. The mechanism of vasovagal syncope is the subject of a great deal of research.
My fiancee' is going to have a colonoscopy and she has vasovagal syncope. The only thing is, her vasovagal is more severe than the average person. When she hits her elbow or pukes, among other things, she has a seizure rather than just fainting. Are there risks with her having a colonoscopy?
My reason for posting today is that I've noticed many posts where vasovagal syncope is listed as a syndrome that ranks with IST etc. It has made me think. When I was 17, I was diagnosed with Vasovagal syndrome...I was one of the first tested on a tilt table, and when I passed out after only 11 minutes, my heart rate dropped to 11 beats per minute!!
I have suffered from the condition vasovagal syncope from the day I could stand up, however I was only diagnosed 3 years ago (due to dimissive doctors), but I am writing to give hope to all of the people who have written in.
EIGHT MONTHS AGO MY 10 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER WAS EATING A CHICKEN SOUP AT THE TABLE BECAUSE HER APPETITE WAS NOT GREAT AT THE TIME DUE TO A COLD. SHE TOLD ME SHE WAS NAUSEAOUS AND I WALKED HER TO THE GARBAGE CAN SO SHE CAN THROW UP, AT THAT MOMENT MY DAUGHTERS LIPS TURNED PALE AND SHE FAINTED, HER HANDS WERE COLD WITH NO SIGN OF COLOR IN HER FNGER NAILS OR FACE, I PICKED HER UP AND SAT HER DOWN AND PUT COLD WATER ON HER FACE AND SHE CAME BACK.
I'm in the process of being tested for vasovagal near syncope (as I haven't lost consciousness). I have had a sleep-deprived EEG and an MRI, both coming back normal. I had an EKG, which was normal. Next week I'm on to an ultra-sound of the heart and then a tilt-table test. My neurologist thought these were psychic seizures but the testing didn't confirm her suspicions.
I have been told that it looks like I'm having a seizure when I pass out but a doctor told me that it's actually not a seizure, it's my nervous system shutting down. I was diagnosed with vasovagal (neurocardiogenic) syncope, although I am not sure if someone's heart stopping is part of vasovagal syncope. I wonder about what may be happening to my brain and body for it to shut down so often. My main daily issues are fatigue/exhaustion and nausea.
Im 25 and have Vasovagal Syncope, sometimes reffered to as VVS, Reflex Syncope or Neurocardiogenic Syncope and i pass out regularly, to the point where i was off work for 9 months. If you're still experiencing problems, I really reccommend checking out CRY, Cardiac Risk in the Young and STARS.org.
It could be epilepsy, but the fact that, from the way you mentioned it, the head banging somewhat woke you up does not point toward a seizure because usually when you come out of a seizure, you are confused, extremely tired, and sore. Also, you wouldn't be able to be woken up from the head banging. Although, the fact that the shower nob held up your head by hair would be suspicious of something more than fainting...
The most recent one, I called 911. Their best guess was that it is vasovagal in nature. Not syncope though. Both episodes were almost exactly the same, except the last one lasted longer. She says she wants to lay in her bed. Then she gets up and says she's sick and coughs into the toilet. Then she says her belly hurts, sits down, and her eyes begin to roll around in head as if she's going to go to sleep or pass out. Her eyes totally glaze over and she can't focus on anything.
Hi, I am a 29 year old female who has been diagnosed as having vasovagal syncope for about 2 years now. The problem I am having is I have numerous other symptoms and no answers. On a day to day basis I am struggling with numbness in fingers and feet as well as sometimes in legs and a lot on my right side of my face. I have been to a cardiologist who implanted a loop monitor and found my heart rate goes tatrachardic numerous times throughout the day even while sleeping.
Once consciousness is restored, marked or prolonged disorientation and confusion are not usually seen in syncope and are more frequently indicative of seizures (the postictal phase of a seizure). Sometimes when there is uncertainty as to whether a patient is experiencing syncope or seizures, an EEG is performed to help rule out seizures. As for syncope, there are numerous possible causes for recurrent syncope.
Hello... Neurocardiogenic syncope (vasovagal syndrome) is related to an autonomic dysfunction. In this condition blood vessels tend to expand, which leads to pooling of blood in the lower parts of the body. As a result, less blood reaches the brain and this causes fainting. The usual stimulus for this action resides in the nerves of the heart. A head-up tilt test can uncover the underlying cause of the fainting in this syndrome.
Syncope is the general termed used to describe loss of consciousness secondary to a cardiovascular problem (such as a heart rhythm problem) or an abnormal heart rate/blood pressure response, as occurs in vasovagal syncope. Syncope in the lying down position is unusual but could occur, particularly with heart rhythm abnormalities. In order to check for that, a heart rhythm monitor could be warn for 48 hours. I am not sure what you mean by passing out while sleeping.
I would suggest seeing a neurologist as well. If they have diagnosed vasovagal syncope, has he had a tilt-table test? At some stages of syncope, there are seizures (the brain gets starved of oxygen in some cases). This is not a good situation and is not normal.
I am seeing a neurologist in london, and he decided together with the cardiologist that midodrine would aliviate my symptoms?. But this was to no effect. Now I just feel tired and desperate. They haven't ruled out a pacemaker so I was wondering whether that would be the next step? Due to all other treatments not working. i just want to know what's happening to me.They said i am a complicated case as these conditions do the total opposite of each other.
Dear dayomo, Vasovagal syncope, also called neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS), is a common finding in young women. It is diagnosed by tilt-table testing and treatment is usually increased salt in the diet, avoiding triggers of the fainting and sometimes with medications such as beta-blockers. It may be accompanied by some fatigue. It is not usually accompanied by shortness of breath, chest pain, headaches, joint pain and numbness. I would probably ask you doctor about seeing a rheumatologist.
My syncope seems to be more infrequent than some others that have posted - have not had a full episode in 6 months but may also be due to avoiding my triggers. I have a friend with vasovagal whose syncope seems to come on much faster than mine so it may depend on each person. For me it's definitely feeling naseous, palms start to sweat and then when I'm close to fainting my vision is messed up (pixelated is probably the only word I have to describe it...
The interesting thing for yoy is that your reaction isn't a typical vasovagal response. It's a little seizure instead. It is definitely neurological. If your regular doctor hasn't heard of this or doesn't know what to do about it, ask for a referral to a neurologist.
Hello, I stumbled accross this site recently and have been encouraged by everyones responses to different types of syncope, especially Vasovagal. I am 25 with Vasovagal Syncope, and have recently had a pretty bad spell of attacks that have ment my sickness at work has been prolonged, but im now on cardio selective beta-blockers and things are looking up. Increased salt intake and reduction of caffene, compression socks etc have all helped me to manage the disorder.
Does the catheterization cause problems with vasovagal syncope? I have suffered from severe fainting spells since I was about 15 and have posted here before about my situation. While the fainting spells no longer scare me abnormally, as I am aware of what to do and their benign overall effect, I do worry about various activities and procedures.
The only other thing that comes to mind is Vasovagal Syncope secondary to POTS. If the Tegretol is controlling the episodes except for the symptom with your hand it would be difficult to say this truly isn't mini-seizures.
I had been diagnosed with vasovagal syncope. A neurologist sent me for an MRI, EEG, and an ANSAR (computerized autonomic nervous system evaluation). All came back normal except for the ANSAR. The ANSAR showed borderline autonomic neuropathy and an abnormal orthostatic reflex. When I was at the neurologist, my pulse was 62 and when I stood up my pulse was 96.
Sounds like Vasovagal Syncope. Secondly, have you been to a physician after this last episode? Any medications ever prescribed for this?
Been researching this exact thing tonight. Look up vasovagal syncope. It's basically fainting or becoming faint after pain or similar stresses. They can resemble seizures, but from your description, it seems to fit this exactly.
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