Seborrheic dermatitis vitamin deficiency

Common Questions and Answers about Seborrheic dermatitis vitamin deficiency

seborrheic-dermatitis

Hi, Seborrhoeic eczema (also Seborrheic dermatitis AmE, seborrhea) is a skin disorder affecting the scalp, face, and trunk causing scaly, flaky, itchy, red skin. It particularly affects the sebum-gland rich areas of skin. Soaps and detergents such as sodium laureth sulfate may precipitate a flare-up, as they strip moisture from the top layers of the skin, and the drying property of these can cause flare-ups and may worsen the condition.
my name is rishi.i am suffering from seborrheic dermatitis since two years. till 19 my hair were so dense,that barber use to say every time,that if a fly by mistake gets inside ,it wont come out alive.the were too curly,but i did'nt liked so curled hair. so,i got my hair straightened and the the problem started. my hair started to fall.i inquired and came to know thats normal after getting hair straightned and i will come back to normal in 2-4 months but that never happned.
I've talked to my friend's father who is a physician and he said these could be symptoms of vitamin b deficiency. The thing is, I eat good sources of vitamin b all the time. I eat bananas, chicken, eggs, and whole grain bread almost every day. But I do drink a lot of water. I would say around 2-3 gallons a day. So could my high water consumption be flushing the vitamin b out of my body?
Hello, Seborrheic dermatitis, rosacea and eczema are not related to deficiency of B Complex, Zinc, Magnesium, Vitamin A, C, E. Seborrheic dermatitis is usually caused by overgrowth of Malassezia furfur. This skin disease commonly affects adolescents and young adults, especially in warm and humid climates and is aggravated by sweating and humidity. The exact cause of rosacea is not known. The basic process seems to involve dilation of the small blood vessels of the face.
One thing also to consider is an underlying vitamin or mineral deficiency. In the case of seborrheic dermatitis, vigorous washing of the face with a mild and bland cleanser may be able to help. You may ask your dermatologist with regards to this. Application of 1% hydrocortisone cream may be also necessary at least twice a day. Do you have any known allergies? Have you been dieting lately or have been lacking sleep lately? Any increase in stress levels?
I have been diagnosed by several dermatologists as having seborrheic dermatitis so I use TGEL shampoo and cetaphil gentle skin cleanser. Recently I stopped using moisturizers because my skin seemed too oily and voila my skin looks very good (my blepharitis also cleared up as soon as I stopped using treatments). However my extremely flaky/seemingly dry lips remain.
So these have to be ruled out. This could also be a case of seborrheic dermatitis. There is no cure as such, but it can be controlled by medicated shampoos and lotions. A tissue biopsy of the scab and underlying tissue may be required to reach a diagnosis. Hope this helps. Please consult a skin specialist. Do let me know if there is any thing else and keep me posted. Take care!
* Discoid lupus erythematosus * Systemic lupus erythematosus * Rosacea * Seborrheic dermatitis * Dermatomyositis * Polymorphous light reaction * Cushing's Disease * Reaction to medication * Eryisipelas * Photosensitivity * Chemical sensitivity * Sunburn * Erythema infectiosum * Human parvovirus B19 infection * Lyme's Disease * Bloom Syndrome * Sarcoidosis * Niacin (vitamin B3) deficiency * Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) deficiency Seborrheic dermatitis is a listed cause of peeling skin.
The first possibility if of seborrheic dermatitis which presents as flaky,dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. The second possibility is of vitamin B deficiency and the third possibility is of atopic dermatitis. Take some vitamin B complex for some days and see if your symptoms improve. If the symptoms persist then please get these possibilities ruled out.
Parasthesias are common in alcoholics and metabolic disorders like diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypoparathyroidismThey can also be due to peripheral vascular disease, nerve irritation, vitamin B12 deficiency or malnutrition. Get your blood sugar and thyroid hormones levels evaluated. You can take some vit B12 for some days and see if the symptoms are gone or not. In case the symptoms persist then get it evaluated from a doctor.
Biotin deficiency isn't common, unless you frequently eat a lot of raw egg white, which contains a protein that blocks the absorption of biotin. Genetic disorder of biotin deficiency, infant seborrheic dermatitis, surgical removal of the stomach, and excessive alcohol consumption may increase a person's requirement for biotin. Biotin deficiency may lead to skin rash, hair loss, high cholesterol and heart problems.
Hello, Dryness of scalp can be due to hormonal imbalance, poor health, poor hygiene, allergic hypersensitivity, lack of rest, emotional stress, excessive consumption of sugar, fat or starch, heredity predisposition and medical causes like eczema, atopic dermatitis or seborrheic dermatitis.
I was just diagnosed with Seborrheic Dermatitis, and after reading about it I found it can also affect the eyebrows. It is a chronic but relatively easy to treat skin condition that supposedly results from too much oil on the skin and commonly affects the scalp and eyebrows, but can also affect the face and chest. I have no idea if this is it, but I have been experiencing a little hair loss on the scalp, but once treated, the hair will grow back.
For your dandruff, get seborrheic dermatitis also ruled out. It is very difficult to precisely confirm a diagnosis without examination and investigations and the answer is based on the medical information provided. For exact diagnosis, you are requested to consult your doctor. I sincerely hope that helps.
* Artificial sweeteners (aspartame) * Caffeine * Cigarette smoking * Diabetes * Hypoglycemia * Insulin resistance * Lack of sunlight/vitamin D deficiency * Under methylation - folate, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 deficiency * Iron, calcium, magnesium, zinc, B3, B6, folate & vitamin C deficiency * Ecstasy, diet pills, and certain medications * Chronic opioid, alcohol, amphetamine & marijuana use * Hormone imbalances (thyroid, adrenal, estrogen) * Progesterone deficiency * Inflamm
Parasthesia due to dysfunctioning of neurons which can be due to diabetes, hypothyroidism, peripheral vascular disease, vitamin B12 deficiency, neurological causes or malnutrition. You can take vitamin B 12 supplements for some days. Foods rich in vitamin B 12 like meats and poultry can also be taken. Also get your blood usgar levels and thyroid hormone levels checked.
Go to another doctor, or prescribe yourself the standard blood panel including vitamin D3, B12, and MMA. As you know, a vitamin B12 deficiency will always cause pernicious anemia.One of the resjuts of PA cold be autonomic Neuropathy which causes irregular heartrates. Your ED can be a result of the same deficiency or even very low cholesterol. Get your testosterone checked. If it is low---and given your symptoms, it probably is. Get a Tribulus Terrestris supplement.
I guess with all of the spotlight on former NFL/New Orleans Saints star Steven Gleason I've become so paranoid about ALS that it's driving my nerves up the wall and I always gravitate towards the worse possible scenario. I'm a relatively healthy ( I have Seborrheic Dermatitis) 34 yr old male. The spasms are barely even noticeable and aren't consecutive and usually is not even in the same spot more than once. Of course my paranoia and fear has made me do a bunch of research on ALS.
Plus, with the development of several chronic dermatitis issues from tx (Rosacea, Seborrheic Dermatitis), the sun only makes all of that get much worse. I also have now found that I can get sunburned, in my car, through my clothes, if I am sitting in the car with sun streaming in a window...often with little red bumps, and a rashy reaction! That is just weird!!! Be careful with the sun, is all I will say. Especially ON tx!!!!!
Adrenal fatigue symptoms include low blood pressure, low body temperature, difficulty falling asleep, waking up in the middle of the night, afternoon slumps, sensitivity to noise, muscle weakness, super sensitive skin, poor tolerance of heat, oily hair. Seborrheic dermatitis may be caused by oily skin or hair. A seasonal affective disorder study showed cortisol levels were lower in winter. Worsening adrenal fatigue during winter might explain your labwork (cortisol is an anti inflammatory).
I think the stuff related to the oil glands on my lower eyelid (which I believe he said is affecting the oil layer of my tear film, for those who have really gotten in-depth in studying dry eye) he has narrowed down to either being related to my seborrheic dermatitis or possibly a just barely onsetting case of rosacea. So I'll skip that part because I don't think it's particularly relevant to dysauto (though if anyone has similar issues and wants more info, I'm glad to answer questions).
I forgot to add two causes: * Niacin (vitamin B3) deficiency * Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) deficiency
I wash my hair every day, with a sulfur-free shampoo. My blood tests all came back in a normal range, with a slight deficiency in vitamin D. I've tried all the dandruff shampoos on the market and none of them offer much relief. Please help me. I have been incredibly unsuccessful at finding a doctor who could give me any clue as to what is happeneing. And my fear of these pimples/scabs of permanently damaging the hair follicles increases by the day. What could this be?
My hair is sarting to become grey.I have seborrheic dermatitis and Iam used to use selsun blue shampoo (that contains selenium) but today I read that it increases the graying of hair when used as shampoo,but may improve the graying if used orally as antioxidant. but i wonder that "Funnily enough, one sign of an overdose of seleniumSelenium - an antioxidant is hair loss." I wish that more studies to be done concerning it. I read that it has an antioxidant activity 50 times as vit.E.
Keratosis Pilaris and Seborrheic Dermatitis. There are multiple treatments I have found for both (though no cures) and they include lactic acid creams, coal tar lotions, and other topicals containing things like Vitamin A and urea. I haven't tried any of the treatments to date, but I am going to start the coal tar treatment for seborrheic dermatits today. If I have any luck, I'll be sure to let you know!
Several weeks later I started losing my hair and developed Seborrheic Dermatitis on my scalp. I lost about half my hair. My hair used to be down to my waist, healthy and SO thick I couldn't put it in a pony tail. I really miss it. Now I have to keep my hair chin length because of the pain. It hurts to touch any hair on my head. I can't wear a hat, go in the wind, go in heat or cold, etc... This pain has caused me to develop an extreme fear of being touched.
My autonomic dysfunction seems to be taking a progressive course from what I can see and over the last five years a lot has either been figured out or has developed (small fiber sensory peripheral neuropathy, gastroparesis, slow intestinal transit, post-ganglionic autonomic small fiber neuropathy, deficiency in two out of the three layers of my tear film, urinary and bowel incontinence, allodynia and hyperalgesia (chronic pain), nosebleeds, vaginal dryness, repeated (atypical) chronic yeast in
MedHelp Health Answers