Seborrheic dermatitis of eyelid

Common Questions and Answers about Seborrheic dermatitis of eyelid

seborrheic-dermatitis

The differential diagnosis of perioral dermatitis is contact dermatitis, rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus, and papular sarcoid Perioral dermatitis is treated with a 6- to 12-week course of systemic antibiotics, such as erythromycin in children. Low potency steroids are also used in few cases. If you are not satisfied with your doctor’s opinion it is suggested to seek second opinion and get your doubts clarified. Keep me posted with more queries Hope it helped.
I have a patch of dry skin on my right eyelid that will not go away. I started putting eye cream on it and it will disappear for a short period but it comes right back. What could cause this? I have tried not putting anything on it thinking it maybe an allergic reaction but it doesn't go away it just gets more irritated.
It sounds like seborrheic dermatitis, which affects the eyelids, among other places. Cause unknown. It comes and goes, for no reason. You can keep using 1% hydrocortisone, as needed, unless you have cataracts or glaucoma. Check with a dermatologist on this, to be sure. Best. Dr.
I really need help. The corner of my right eyelid has been bad for about probably a year now; It's so irrating and i've tried everything.. cortisone creams, eye drops, tea bags for swelling.. petrolleum jelly, natural tears.. to name a few i guess... I just have no idea what can help it, nothing makes the reddness go away, if I could even just get rid of the red, it might look a little better. Any suggestions?
Hello, It can be due to dry skin, seborrheic dermatitis or eczema skin. The mainstay of management is liberal use of moisturizers after washing with luke warm water. Soap should be used minimally. Moisturizers should be reapplied liberally during the day.You can also use a topical cortisone (steroid) cream or ointment. Adding a humidifier to the central heating system of your home or using a humidifier also helps. If still the symptoms persist then other possibilities need to be ruled out.
Another possibility which should be ruled out is of seborrheic dermatitis. Please consult an eye specialist and get these possibilities ruled out. It is very difficult to precisely confirm a diagnosis without examination and investigations and the answer is based on the medical information provided. For exact diagnosis, you are requested to consult your doctor. I sincerely hope that helps. Take care and please do keep me posted on how you are doing.
Years ago diagnosed with Rosacea and just recently seborrheic dermatitis. Have oily acne prone skin. Could the eyes be affected by having oily acne prone skin with possible Rosacea and seborrheic dermatitis involvement? And what could be the white spot on the inner eyelid. I am playing detective by myself trying to figure out who to see, where to go, what to do. Doctors arent helping much. Any advice? Thanks.
Eyelid problems may be due to blepharits. This is a condition which may be caused by seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis presents with scaling which occurs in the eyelids. Is this applicable in your case? The management for this differs from that of a fungal infection.
Was tested for allergies today (none), opthamologist says just have dry eye, but I continue to have eyelid irritation, sometimes burning itching eyes. Was diagnosed with Rosacea years ago, and recently with seborrheic dermatitis of the face around the nose/lip area. Can the rosacea/dermatitis be contributing to and affecting the eyelids? And what is the white small spot on the insider of my lower eyelid? Thank you.
Blepharitis is an ocular disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the eyelid margins. The other possibility is of seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky, dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. It is very difficult to precisely confirm a diagnosis without examination and investigations and the answer is based on the medical information provided.
It is characterized by inflammation of the eyelid margins. The causes are seborrheic dermatitis (similar to dandruff) and occasional infection by Staphylococcus bacteria. Foolow this important treatment principle as a daily routine of lid margin hygiene: - Apply a warm wet compress to the lids - such as a washcloth with hot water - for about 2 minutes. -Use facial soap or non-burning baby shampoo (make sure to dilute the soap solution 1/10 with water first).
Hello, It can be seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky, dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp. under the nose or anywhere on face. You can treat flaking and dryness with over-the-counter dandruff or medicated shampoos. Shampoo the hair vigorously and frequently (preferably daily). Active ingredients in these shampoos include salicylic acid, coal tar, zinc, resorcin, ketoconazole, or selenium.
Hello, What you seem to be having is seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky,dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. Treatment usually involves use of antifungal, anti inflammatory and sebo suppressive or Keratolytic ingredients.
It may also be associated with seborrheic dermatitis . Seborrheic condition my present with some degree of scaling in the area. The scaling may be noted in the eye lashes. Is this applicable to your mother's case?
Hello, I cannot confirm anything without examination but it sounds like seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky,dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. You can treat flaking and dryness with over-the-counter dandruff or medicated shampoos. Shampoo the hair vigorously and frequently (preferably daily).
Hello, Seborrheic dermatitis is an important possibility from your symptoms. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky, dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. It is usually caused by overgrowth of Malassezia furfur. This skin disease commonly affects adolescents and young adults, especially in warm and humid climates and is aggravated by sweating and humidity.
Hello, I cannot confirm without examination but apart from the possibility of eczema the possibility of seborrheic dermatitis is also there. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky, dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. This skin disease commonly affects adolescents and young adults, especially in warm and humid climates and is aggravated by sweating and humidity.
Hello, Blepharitis is an ocular disease characterized by inflammation of the eyelid margins. Generally the causes are seborrheic dermatitis (similar to dandruff) and infection by Staphylococcus bacteria,but sometimes allergies like allergic responses to dust mite feces and other allergens can also cause it. Allergy shots will be helpful provided if it is confirmed that blepharitis in your friends’ case is caused by an allergic reaction.
Hello, Apart from seborrheic dermatitis, one possibility is of any allergic reaction and the second is of blepharitis. Blepharitis is an inflammation of the upper eyelid in response to any infection or allergy. Dietary factors in some individuals (caffeine, alcohol, spicy foods, tobacco) may also cause blepharitis. Apply warm compresses on the eyelid and keep the area clean with frequent washing. Also avoid applying any eye makeup till the symptoms get resolved.
I'm a nineteen year old guy who got a small red spot on my nose, about the size of a pinky fingernail, about two years ago. Since then it has spread across my nose to the point of almost completely covering my nose and moving onto other parts of my face. It has also spread to my scrotum and penis, as well as my left eyelid, upper chest and elbow. I've seen a dermatologist for two years now and all it's done during the time is spread and get worse.
Falling off of eyelashes may be due to skin problems involving the eyelids. Blepharitis or seborrheic dermatitis are conditions which may cause falling off of eye lashes. Is your skin condition associated with scaling or redness of the eyelids? I suggest that a baseline consult with an ophthalmologist will help. A complete eye examination will help exclude an underlying eyelid problem.
Hello, I cannot confirm anything without examination but one possibility is of seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky,dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. The other possibility is of alopecia totalis, ( in this there is hairfall of scalp as well as eyebrow and eyelashes), blepharitis especially seborrhiec blepharitis, icthyosis or leprosy.
Ringworm is a fungal infection, nummular dermatitis is a sort of eczema and allergic reaction if one of its triggers. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky,dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. I suggest you to consult a dermatologist and get the diagnosis confirmed first so that specific treatment can be started. Do not put clotrimazole cream because it looks like she is allergic to the cream.
Hello, For such symptoms blepharitis needs to be ruled out. Blepharitis is an ocular disease characterized by inflammation of the eyelid margins. Generally the causes are seborrheic dermatitis (similar to dandruff) and infection by Staphylococcus bacteria, but sometimes allergies like allergic responses to dust mite feces and other allergens can also cause it.
Hello, From the symptoms seborrheic dermatitis needs to be ruled out. Seborrheic dermatitis is a common skin condition that causes flaky,dry, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas esp under the nose or anywhere on face. Treatment usually involves use of antifungal, anti inflammatory and sebo suppressive or Keratolytic ingredients.
Hello, These symptoms can be due to allergies or seborrheic dermatitis. Seborrheic dermatitis is usually caused by overgrowth of Malassezia furfur. This skin disease commonly affects adolescents and young adults, especially in warm and humid climates and is aggravated by sweating and humidity. Topical antifungals and mild steroids are the usual treatment and combination of the two can be used to treat stubborn patches.
Hello, It can be due to seborrheic dermatitis, blepharitis especially seborrhiec blepharitis, icthyosis or leprosy. Blepharitis is an ocular disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the eyelid margins. I suggest you to consult a dermatologist and get all these possibilities evaluated. It is very difficult to precisely confirm a diagnosis without examination and investigations and the answer is based on the medical information provided.
Seborrheic blepharitis, the most common type of blepharitis, is usually one part of the spectrum of seborrheic dermatitis seborrhea which involves the scalp, lashes, eyebrows, nasolabial folds and ears. The most common type of blepharitis is often found in people with a rosacea skin type. The oil glands in the lid secrete a modified oil which leads to inflammation at the gland openings which are found at the edge of the lid.
About 7months ago there were little tiny pathes on the corner of my upper eyelid at the end of the eyebrow, those lasted about 8months, I no longer have those. Also I get real dry inside my ear and also on the back side of my ear. The other thing I have noticed is on the edge of my scalp on the forehead it gets irritated(sometimes). Please help, any information will be appreciated.
Hello, Without examination it is difficult to confirm a diagnosis but the symptoms are suggestive of seborrheic dermatitis which is usually caused by overgrowth of Malassezia furfur. This skin disease commonly affects adolescents and young adults, especially in warm and humid climates and is aggravated by sweating and humidity. Topical antifungals and mild steroids are the usual treatment and combination of the two can be used to treat stubborn patches.
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