Rebif vs betaseron

Common Questions and Answers about Rebif vs betaseron

rebif

After reading clinical study's and reading other forums, I have narrowed it down to Rebif or Betaseron due to the strength of the meds. My Neuro is leaning towards Rebif for me. I just need a thorough explanation as to why. My last two meetings with him where with me laying on the floor because I couldn't sit down due to lumbar puncture headaches! I will keep you all posted. Thanks again and God Bless you all!
Is anyone else on Rebif? Any pointers or tips or suggestions from people who have been on Rebif (or Betaseron or Copaxone or Avonex)? I'm a little scared to start therapy, but also excited. I'm trying to be very positive about this. Thanks!
I can't speak to Copaxone, because I've never used it. I have, however used both Rebif and Betaseron, and the injections aren't bad, at all. It's done subcutaneously (just under the skin), and around slightly fattier areas, I hardly felt it at all. Unfortunately, I'm allergic to Rebif. My symptoms were progressing at a fairly rapid clip, so my neuro got me onto Tysabri. I've had some 20 infusions, now, and for me, it's great!
There she had a spinal tap done and was hooked up with steriods for one week. All improved. Now she is on Betaseron. The first mri showed past attacks but not as sevier as this one. 2 Years into it her only thing was for 4 months the right side of her face went numb. She works 28-30 hours a week and college classes three time a week. She studies nursing.Tired alot is the biggest effect to the date. We take ONE DAY AT A TIME. Ms is a part now of who she is but not all.
Hi Jenny, The truth is all of the CRAB's work about the same and the choice you have to make depends on your personal preferences. Copaxone is one class of drug while Rebif, Avonex, and Betaseron are all interferons. The British UK site has one of the best walk-throughs on picking a drug that I have seen. It discusses in depth each DMD and its side-effects and injection schedule/technique.
Hi Lew and Welcome to this community. As for which DMD over the other - my neuro equates it to the Pepsi vs Coke challenge. They are both colas and both drinks and it all comes down to personal preference. the same with the DMD's - they are basically the same when it comes to effectiveness. I like the following site for new people to view to help to understand the differences in these drugs.... http://www.msdecisions.org.uk/ You don't have to be British to use it.
Paul O’Connor (University of Toronto) and colleagues reported results of the BEYOND study, evaluating the effectiveness of high and low doses (500 mcg vs. 250 mcg) of Betaseron® (interferon beta-1b) and Copaxone. Participants numbered 899, 892, and 448 in these groups, respectively. No differences were found in the risk of relapse, the primary endpoint, or secondary endpoints such as MRI findings.
(depending on the study you read) Avonex 3% to 5% Rebif 20% to 25% Betaseron 45% Plus, the side effect profile for Betaseron is not attractive to me. It would not be among "my" choices. This was influenced heavily by the distaste for it from my neurologist. I certainly respect that your wife's non-wienie neuro (lol) wishes to be aggressive in her treatment. If I thought it would make a difference for me, I would likely choose Rebif.
I really noticed the difference when I forgot the Ibuprofen! I'm starting Betaseron, soon ( I was allergic to Rebif), and I imagine the scenario will be the same. I did my shots at night before bed, and by morning, most of the time I felt human. If I had any residual "creepiness", I took another 400mg of Ibuprofen with breakfast, and I was good to go for the rest of the day. Good luck with what ever decision you make, and WELCOME!
The drugs with the longest safety data are the injectables (Copaxone, Rebif, Avonex, Betaseron), but there are three oral drugs these days too (Gilenya, Aubagio, Tecfidera), as well as a monthly infusion (Tysabri). There is also at least one "off-label" option with growing positive data (Rituxan is used by a couple of our members). Some of us (me!) are also volunteers on drug studies and are taking drugs that aren't out there yet.
I am in my fifth month of copaxone. I recently (two weeks ago) had another MRI and EMG. No change on the MRI but some activity on EMG related to CNS disease. The neuro wants to stick with copaxone at least for six months but I am rapidly losing strength (based on pt eval). So, if I had to choose, I would try something else only because of the progression of weakness and spasms. ISP see neuro Friday so we will see.
I got this ftim betaseron and rebif. Its not just from copaxine. I hate it. My arms legs stomach and hips all look terrible. I quit using my arms in hopes it would look better with time but ut hasn't.
If so, if your fearful of the Tysabri you can always go to Rebif, which is 44mg, or Betaseron 1ml vs. the 30mgs you are on w/the Avonex. And, there is always the daily Copax, which I'm sure you know has shown to work for some too - though by different mechanism than the interferons. If you stay w/interferons, least your body is already 5 months into them and it would just be an increase and sub-q. Did they treat your ON Jason?
I have been on Rebif for about 4-5 weeks now and am doing M,W,F injections and just started the 44mcg doses. Seems that each time I give an injection the experience is different. Sometimes it barely hurts and sometimes it stings soo bad going in. I am having a really hard time with this and feel silly because I'm a nurse myself..but last wednesday it hurt so bad I had to sit there and cry...
I would like to hear from MS patients regarding their experiences in dealing with the various manufacturing company call centers - Betaplus (Betaseron), Shared Solutions (Copaxone), Patient Services (Avonex & Tysabri), Others?. What do you like and don't like? What services are important to you vs. which are not? What are your pet peeves and how do you suggest we fix them? Thank you all!
The CRAB DMD's are all quite similar in results - Copaxone Rebif Avonex and Betaseron -and have been in use for a nice length of time to study. The newer drugs - Gilenya and Tysabri - are usually held in reserve in case the CRABs are not effective. Each one of us reacts differently to these DMDs and what works well for one person may not do so well for the next. It is very much an individual thing.
And there's also Aubagio, another pill, plus the traditional injectable CRABs--Copaxone, Rebif, Avonex and Betaseron, all of which have their pros and cons. Have you been on any of these? I'm glad you realize it's important to be on some kind of treatment.
The problem appears to be dose-related. Betaseron is the highest dose, Rebif next and Avonex the lowest. Once you have neutralizing antibodies to one of the Interferon-beta meds, you have it to ALL of them. If JohM is around, he has doen the most research into this problem, if I remember right. I hope he steps in and adds to or corrects this. This should probably be a Health Page? TL - Surely there is a happier medium between zombiness and excrutciating pain...
Then there's the interferons (Avonex, Rebif, Betaseron). They are generally considered a bit more effective than Copaxone. The major side effect to them is a flu-like reaction for 12-24 hours after the shot (Avonex is once a week, Rebif is 3x a week). I hated that reaction. Think of the worst flu you ever had and how bad your body ached during it and that is what this shot is like for some people.
I am not to keen on the warnings. Again it is the benefit vs risk. With my delicate immune system I am not eager to risk other illnesses. My MS Specialist explained these new orals will work better in stopping the progression than the injectables but they have way more risk. The better the drug in stopping progression the greater the risk.
There's such a number of variables (insured vs uninsured; US vs universal health care systems; patient assistance programs at drug companies, the varying cost of the med itself depending on the market you're in, what dose it is at, whether generics are available, the pricing as per specific pharmacy, etc etc) so I'm not sure our answers can necessarily to helpful to you....... ........
Partner shudders. So the question really comes down to Risk vs. Benefit vs. Cost. With my drug plan, Copaxone is $1.50 a day. The Docs say Copaxone reduces the risk of a relapse by 30% year on year. My research says that if you stay on it, you have a pretty good chance of limiting your disability score at 10 years. I only have one good optic nerve/tract left. No more redundancy in the vision system. We have too much to do around the ranch.
Still in Limboland..... Had MRI with positive brain changes 9mths ago, seen a Neuro, failed on a couple of tests, but said, he does not think I have MS, even though I had no idea I was being tested for MS untill Janurary this year, the Balance Clinic were the ones who got him in, because of the results of my MRI. His reason's were:::::: 1) My brain change is because I smoke, (He told me this at the end of his testing.
I think your doc probably had reasons for going right to Tysabri. My doc felt I was beyond the reach of the CRABs (Copaxone, Rebif, Avonex, Betaseron), These are the traditional first meds. I had zero side effects from Tysabri. Other than the PML issue, one of Tysabri's benefits is its fairly innocuous side effect profile. Given that you diagnosis is fairly new, I might be inclined to think your fatigue is MS related, rather than Tysabri related.
24pm New Studies Show the MS Drugs Don’t Slow Progression Ashton Embry, July 7, 2010 Five years ago, I wrote a New Pathways column on the value of the commonly used, CRAB drugs (Copaxone, Rebif, Avonex, Betaseron) for MS. It was based on published evaluations by the Cochrane Collaboration, an organization which is free from drug company influence.
My doc thought that I was beyond the reach of the first line meds, Copaxone, Rebif, Avonex and Betaseron. He suggested Tysabri. I took him up on his suggestion and my MS has been stable ever since. I don't know how active/progressive you MS is. I too am curious as to why your doc jumped over Tysabri. One last thought, I too was startled by your description of your doc. I've never seen anything similar here, which is one of the reasons I keep coming back.
I am not sure where you live but the 4 standard ones are Avonex, Rebif, Betaseron and Copaxone. The newest one, Tecfidera may be available to you. If they have dx you, then you will need to decide if you wish to take the treatment and a lot of docs seem to leave the choice of which med to take up to the patient. I'm glad you found us.There is a wealth of knowledge and info here. :-) I was dx April 4, 2013 and will be starting Rebif on June 22.
The good news is I no longer have to inject Rebif! I always felt like I was at least doing something to try and combat the effects of MS by taking Rebif, so I have mixed feelings about stopping this treatment. I'm to continue with the Gabapentin and Detrol LA to deal with some of the symptoms. I didn't like the way I felt on Modafinil, so he rx'd Amantidine for me to try for fatigue. He's scheduling an MRI for next summer and when I see him next the fall we'll decide what treatments to try.
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