Pumping breast milk for the first time

Common Questions and Answers about Pumping breast milk for the first time

milk

I just let my husband do one feeding a day and it was a great bonding time <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the two of them. At <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> he didnt want the bottle if I was there but he stopped caring by like 3 months.
I pumped <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> 6 1/2 months, and then fed milk from the freezer <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> 2 more months. That milk that she was getting at 7 and 8 months was produced when she was a newborn-6 months. It was perfectly fine. While the composition of milk does change, it is still great for baby- even milk from a different time and frozen still has more beneficial properties than formula. This little one will be getting frozen milk when I quit pumping.
Well I guess I should just wait a while..and be exhausted.. I really don't want to do anything to mess up my chances at breastfeeding and the people around me are not educated on the subject, either.. So they don't understand why I can't really do that so easily or be as flexible as mothers who bottle/formula feed.. It's all so complicated to me..
That sounds great mommikat breastfeeding at night would work <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> me I read on this blog that milk does come in at the wee hours <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> seems like it's going to be a lot of work but I'm determined to make sure I don't have to resort to formula
My daughter would not take the breast at all, but that was my mistake because I gave her bottle at <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span>. I was <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> month and feeding her that breastmilk. She would only take formula when we were out. Believe me, I was so fed up with pumping I was about to give up. Then one day I was too lazy to get out of bed during a midnight feeding and I just gave her breast and she took it. I was amazed so since then I have only breastfed her. Now she won't even take a bottle.
And when u are doing the feedings it takes double the time bc u have to pump everytime the baby eats. So I would definitely say its easier to keep baby on the breast. My son won't take it now bc it is too much work to get the milk out compaired to a bottle.
I pumped 20 minutes per breast and as I pumped I dis massaging and compression to get the most milk out. At <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> you may not get much but the more you do it the more milk you will produced for the pump. Freeze your milk immediately and I would freeze maybe 2 to 3ozs at a time to make sure not gets wasted.
You can switch at anytime or do both at the same time it doesnt really matter. The only real big difference is its harder in my opinion. Also not every mom responds to a pump but when baby latches on she produces perfectly because its better suction. That could be one of the things that could ruin that plan. Just curious and dont take it as me being rude just curiousity. Why pump instead? Ive always been curious as to peoples reasonings of why.
Continuous or often pumping and breastfeeding will increase your breast milk. The more frequent you breastfeed the baby and sufficiently "emptying" the breast, the more milk you will produce. But do not forget to nourish your own body, eat lots of fruits and vegetables, foods rich in vitamins that will help keep you healthy.
To avoid a supplement, you will need to pick up supply if you're going to be separated from baby for an extended period of time (and if you have no way to feed baby from the breast while you're away) Your have valid concerns. Let's try pumping after you feed your baby (or from the other breast) What kind of manual pump are you using? Have you tried hand expression?
I'm just trying to help you out BC it seems like you really want to give you're baby breast milk. My mil is the director <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> wic she knows a lot about this and I've asked her so many questions I'm just sharing what I know. If you have any more questions you can always message me.. if I don't know the answer I can ask my mil for you and let you know.
Even with our rough breastfeeding experience, I have to say that nursing directly from the breast is less work than <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span>. <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> required a 3 hr a day commitment, plus all the time needed to feed the baby, warm the milk, wash the bottles, etc. It was also harder to go places. It is a good option as an alternative when nursing doesn't work out, but I certainly wouldn't think it is easier or less time consuming.
My dd had latch issues that caused me to exclusively pump <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> month. I pumped on the regular, around the clock. I don't think there was a moment it WASNT strapped onto me! That thing made me feel like my nipples were being ripped off. As a matter of fact, i ended up getting a friction blister on my nipple from it! Also, after a few weeks of regular and constant use, the motor began to go out and i would lose suction midpump! so i bought a $40 medela hand pump.
So let's say I just fed him completely on my left breast....would I pump the right breast afterwards? I've only been feeding him from one breast at a time to prevent a fore/hind milk imbalance. Also, when I start to pump...that will make me produce that much more milk right? So will I have to keep pumping often just to keep up or can I just pump when I think I'll need it later on in the week or something?
I agree with the first post, always go by the oldest milk in the bottle/bag. I combine milk all the time. As <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the different amounts, one side typically produces more milk than the other. for me I get more output on my left side.
(I had to travel once a month usually <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> 3-4 days at a time so it was good to have a surplus of milk in the freezer (at one point we had an entire little freezer full of milk!) and then she had a few little stomach viruses too along the way and then too it was good to have the extra milk)...plus Daddy liked to give her a bottle sometimes too so I pumped so he could also partake in the feedings.
I used a nipple shield and started putting her to the breast every time she was hungry <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> and she soon got the hang of nursing. It was a struggle and time consuming. I weaned her from the shield after about 2.5-3 weeks. Now at 10 months old breastfeeding is great! I pump only once a day. If you are going to exclusively pump you will need to mimic her feeding patterns to increase your supply as her demand increases. Try and find a Le Leche league in your area.
If all else fails, speak to your son's pediatrician.' As <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span>....I started at 2.5 weeks postpartum with my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> son and 1 week postpatrum the second time around - the second time, I found that I was engorged that much sooner.....and my little guy was such a good sleeper that he was already going 5.6 hours at night right out of the gate. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that you might want to see how your little guy takes to a bottle.
<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> off <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> is way less effective than baby to breast, so you are always going to get less than what baby is actually getting. Secondly your babys stomach is really small right now so he/she doesn't need very much. As your baby grows your supply will increase to meet babys demands. Also babies tend to cluster feed in the beginning to get your supply up. So it may seem like you are feeding non-stop and you may worry that they are not getting enough but it is just natures way!
Yeah, you may have to pump <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a longer period of time to draw out the hind milk. Both the foremilk and the hind milk are important for each and every feeding. If you have drawn it out, you will notice it will separate in the fridge and have the fattier hind milk on top while the watery foremilk will be on the bottom. Gentle swirling of the bottle under running warm tap water will help mix it and warm it at the same time. Let him snack at the breast, Kim.
u will probably be advised to give your baby the actual breast <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> feed or 2 as the colustrum stuff that comes out is VERY important <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> your baby(so i was told again!lol!)if u find you enjoy breast feeding but dont want to do it in public then breastfeed at home and use formular when u are out and bout!however if u only want 2 do it for a month i suggest u only use a bottle as sometimes, like my son, a baby wont feed from a bottle after having the breast!
If you want to pump, it should always be switched back and forth between breastfeeding as well, and you should establish your supply with breastfeeding <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span>. My lactation consultant told me no pump <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> at least the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> 4 weeks, definitely should've listened!
I love the above suggestion about the "nipple sandwich" and pumping before feeding sessions. If you're nipple are truly inverted (which is different from "inverted"/flat) then the nipple may "pucker" in more when you try to draw it out, this is because short milk ducts (the milk "hoses") located from the nipple to the aveoli are what cause inverted nipples. They simply can't reach.
It is not known how long thc stays in the milk so <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> may or may not work. Either way its not worth the risk. If you are going to take anything in harmful to your baby u should not breastfeed and switch to formula. Good luck.
If later on you want to pump a bottle then that is fine but believe me you will not want to wash and prepare all the time on top of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> and might end up quiting. Also if you try a bottle to soon you can give the baby nipple confusion. Pumps, bottles, pacifiers should not be used in the first three weeks. I suggest you call a la leche leauge consultant in your area, look them up online.
I began <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> the day that my milk came in. What worked <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> me was pumping every two hours for 10-15 minutes on each side. I recommend Medela Pump in Style pump where you get hospital-grade pumping on both sides at once. Also, if your milk starts to cut back, you can take up to 9 Fenugreek a day (purchase from GNC or similar), which smells like maple syrup and is great for increasing lactation. Also, you should drink a lot of water.
It is a hospital grade pump and world wide recognized as the best pump on the market.
In the hospital Or once home? And would the lack of baby to the breast make one’s supply less? I plan on trying to BF in the hospital, but once we get home I “think” I might just pump as I will be returning to work with in 2 weeks after he is here. I was told after my 2nd son was born that, I needed to BF him in order to keep a good supply?? Is that true? Is there anything I need to know about exclusively Bpumping? Is there things I would need to do different?
The lactation consultant suggested the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>first</span> of the morning - pump after I feed the baby. Do both breasts the same amount of time <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> pumping. It's always better to have extra milk in the freezer.
Also, the baby can get milk out much better than the pump (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the majority of women). <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pumping</span> once like you are will not cause your little one to not get enough milk. Getting 4 oz per pumping isn't bad at all, especially breastfeeding as well.
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