Provigil and parkinson's disease

Common Questions and Answers about Provigil and parkinson's disease

provigil

FATIGUE ALONE SHOULD OF BEEN ENOUGH,IF IT'S A GOOD PCP HE WILL GET YOU THE PROVIGIL. MY PCP HAD TO CALL AND EXPLAIN THAT I COULDN'T TAKE THE RITALIN AND THAT I NEEDED THE PROVIGIL. IT'S POLITICAL MUMBO-JUMBO ,BUT THEY PREFER A CHEAPER,GENERIC MED FIRST BEFORE A HIGH PRICED ONE. HANG IN THERE,PAST RECORDS SHOULDN'T BE NECCESARY,CONSTANT FATIGUE SHOULD OF BEEN ENOUGH. DARN INSURANCE COMPANIES.
This is a med that is also used for Parkinson's Disease and as an antiviral med (like against influenza), but has great anti-fatigue properties, but can have troublesome side effects in some. Please be aware that overexerting can have lasting effects for days. Duh...you've likely learned that already. How often do you need to make the drive for karate? Would it be possible to rest up for a day or so ahead of time. It's hard, but we have to involve our families in budgeting our energy.
Yesterday at the grocery store, My legs kept trying to give out on me and would barely hold me up, and the eye pain and burning in my face has been nonstop. Does stress mess with the MS this badly?
17 Back to Top Disorders Medically Treated With Amphetamines * Obesity * Parkinson's disease * Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder * Narcolepsy (uncontrolled episodes of sleep)18 Short-Term Effects * High body temperature * Cardiovascular system failure * Hostility or paranoia * Irregular or increased heart rate/heart beat19 * Increased diastolic/systolic blood pressure * Increased activity/talkativeness * Euphoria * Heightened sense of w
Then somehow they discovered that it was useful in treating Parkinson's Disease. I'm not sure when they discovered that it was useful for the fatigue in MS. Sorry, probably more than you wanted to know. There is a support group for people who talk too much: It's called ON-AND-ON-ANON...
my mom is starting to develop thyroid disease (looks like Hashimoto's due to her slightly elevated thyroid antibody results), she has arthritis (we don't know if it's RA), and she has terrible environmental allergies, as do my siblings and I. Some of my maternal aunts have thyroid disease, and my paternal grandfather had diabetes, which my father looks like he's developing, too. My MRI is clean for MS, so I don't think my neurologist is worried about this.
I have also ran out and have been without it for several days and the side effects are awful lots of vertigo and nightmares,I have also gained weight and just don't feel like when I do take it like I and suppose to which is 99% of the time that it is all that great . My Dr. told me nothing about how difficult it was to come off of and I am pretty upste about it, sorry I dont have any answer for you but if you figure it out let me know thanks!
Because I have a pacemaker, I can't have an MRI. Tests done include a CAT scan, two EEG's and a PET scan, along with lots of blood and urine work. All "normal." Although the clonazepam has helped the chorea, the other symptoms remain. I also take Provigil for the fatigue. My current doctors insist that I don't need further testing. My sister was dagnosed with MS in her thirties and is treated currently (she's 54). I have two aunts with Parkinson's.
The newest cousin of Provigil is Nuvigil and some of our members are on it. I hope this helps and I hope you stay with us.
Newer studies have also shown that coffee may have benefits, such as protecting against Parkinson's disease, type 2 diabetes and liver cancer. And it has a high content of antioxidants. But this doesn't mean you should disregard the old maxim "Everything in moderation." Although coffee may not be very harmful...." http://www.thisisms.com/article165.html "So is coffee dangerous for people with MS?
I hate to say this, but "normal" MRI and blood tests, and your resting tremors, are consistent with Parkinson's. Has your doctor been considering this? Check out this link: http://www.umm.edu/parkinsons/diagnosis.htm and the links in the sidebar at that site. They recommend seeing a specialist in movement neurology. Maybe the MedHelp Parkinson's group can help you too. I hope you find your answer soon.
anti depressant and going to ask for provigil or something for energy. maybe i will just ask to be switched to something else.
I did research Nuvigil and found that Provigil is basically the same and available as a generic. Any thoughts on that or any of the other meds? I've been getting better for the last few weeks (basically since the lumbar puncture--go figure) but slowly. I can work almost full-time again, though I'm exhausted when I get home and basically do nothing else. I don't want this to happen again! I guess no one does.
Hi Liz, my name is Mike and I just completed my second round of treatment on the Vertex Prove 3 trial. I'm hoping that I'm cured. Reading your post was like looking into a mirror image of a post I made about 7-8 weeks ago. In my post I was "whining" about my wife not understanding just how sick I feel ALL the time. A couple people at this forum told me to give my wife and family a mini-vacation FROM ME!
However, my case seems to be much more advanced than those around me (I haven't been able to work full-time for the past 4-years) and have also suffered from many of the symptoms above -- albeit much more mild -- for decades. Also, within the past 5-years I have been diagnosed with celiac disease, hashimoto's disease and some sort of autonomic dysfunction; curious whether those diseases could be related to Lyme? So, my results: For years I tested negative on both ELISA and Western Blot tests.
My dad was diagnosed in his mid 20s, and my uncle was diagnosed a couple years ago at age 30. And I'm due for my follow-up appointment with my neurologist for a new MRI. The last MRI showed spots that were so small he couldn't tell what they were, IF they were anything. But because of my family history he wanted to be sure. So I'm still waiting that out. But I wanted to point out that if an MRI doesn't show ANY LESIONS on your brain, then you DON'T have MS.
A big hello to all from Australia This place is so special to me for the love and support which is greatly needed when newly dxed. My MS journey started on 5 May 2011 with headache and numb,tingling feet. Over the week the numbness and tingling climbed all the way up my body to the start of my chest. Officially dx 4 August and am now on Copaxone.
The Marshall Protocol is a medical treatment being used by physicians worldwide to treat a variety of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including (but not limited to) Sarcoidosis, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Crohn’s Disease, and Rheumatoid Arthritis. While other treatments for chronic disease use palliative medications in an effort to cover up symptoms, the Marshall Protocol is a curative treatment, which addresses the root cause of the problem.
History of distinct attacks/remissions? Of individual symptoms, yes. Big bad attacks, no. Lots of stuff happened for about 3 years (lasting 1 day to several months), then leveled off. Always mildly dizzy. MRI lesions; Yes, but small, scattered, and nonspecific (age 42-46, mild migraineur, borderline BP & cholesterol). "Clearing of old lesions and appearance of new ones" according to radiologist (2x)--but neurologists not "impressed.
I only say this because caught soon the medications that now exist can slow and or delay this disease from progressing so fast. Though every MS case is different depending where and which nerves have the lessions. Good luck and don't go it alone many people live there whole life without too many problems.
I was SO angry about this, but since that time I was dx'd with the Still's Disease and have been explained that the spasticity and pain with it is sometimes the first symptom of the disease and then the arthritis later. I am dealing with the arthritis now, it truly sucks. I would like to write that stupid neuro a letter thanking him for making me feel like an idiot.
I've recently switched my PCP and she feels that I have chronic Lyme's Disease, which certainly fits the symptoms. I am two weeks into Doxycycline treatment that will last a month and will follow-up from there. It's a scary yet positive prognosis as with the right doctors I can most likely be treated aggressively and reduce the symptoms I feel on a daily basis. Thank you for reading my story.
MedHelp Health Answers