Prednisolone for cats

Common Questions and Answers about Prednisolone for cats

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In other words the list of allergens that are possible contributors to your <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> infection is endless. Sometimes <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> is helpful in controlling the problem, sometimes a monthly or so injection of depo-medrol is effective. It would be best to have the problem diagnosed by a vet. Eosinophilic granuloma complex resembles other disease such as: an encapsulated foreign body, squamous cell carcinoma, other dermal masses, fungal infections, etc.
As a traditionally trained holistic veterinarian, I have has success using holistic, natural therapies <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> with IBD. We use a home made diet(1/3 lean protein such as a chicken breast, or lamb, salmon, veal, turkey, duck; 1/3 long acting carbohydrates like sweet potatoes,or any kind of potato, rice, pasta or oatmeal; 1/3 veggies like broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, peas etc. Cook it up and mix together, add a little (1/2 teaspoon) extra virgin olive oil.
I was diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis about 5 years ago, I'm 24 years old right now, RA engaged my left ankle and my doctor prescribed <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> me (six 5mg pill per a day) during my hospitalization as well as chloroquine, Folic Acid and calcium D. The treatment went well and after a while she decided to lower the dosage step by step, it took 2 years for me to walk normally again (July-August 2009), during that time the dosage for prednisolone was 1 per a week.
They do not miss a beat without thir teeth because <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> do not chew they gulp. Anyway check the Stomatitis forum <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> lots of info, and make an appointment with a Dental Specialist. If this is too expensive you can use a credit card called Care Credit backed by GE. Hopefully your dentist will allow this and you can make payments over 2 year period, monthly, with no interest. That is what I did. If you want any other info I am here to help. Once those teeth are removed life is GOOD again.
Since our cats spend a lot of their time outside, and we live in a high-desert climate, we leave food and water out <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> our <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span>. This poor stray started coming around our house because of the food and water of course. We don't mind feeding and trying to take care of him. We are unable to get very close to him. We even tried a live trap, but he's too wise for that. He's losing hair and scratching heavily along both sides of his body (underneath and half-way up his sides).
She was on <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> but it eventually got to the point it didn't help. We tried a diet of Science Diet AD <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a while but she is a picky eater and eventually refused to eat it. Is there a diet you recommend trying? Should I try one of the alternative protein diets like duck and potato,rabbit etc? Thank you again.
<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> with flea allergy dermatitis may require anti-flea preparations, such as Revolution more frequently than non-allergic animals. I also recommend Capstar, oral medication. Exterminating the house for fleas may also be necessary. Occasionally, prednisolone is required to keep a really allergic cat under control, and may help in your cat's case.
If it was due to an a fungal or mite infection other <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> in your household would probably be exhibiting symptoms. Please take him to the vet <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> evaluation. The vet can perform a skin scraping and other diagnostic tests. If it is truly behavioral, there are excellent behavioral modification medications that should help. If it is allergies, prednisolone, Atopica, and/or a special hypoallergenic diet may help.
This can be a difficult issue to resolve so you should talk to your veterinarian or a behavioralist to discuss the whole household situation. The <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> can make <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> drink and urinate more also. So talk to your vet about whether this may be the case and if you can safely decrease the dose. Your cat that is having hard stools may be having difficulty defecating causing the blood you see. That can be due to dehydration caused by kidney disease or other medical problems.
What is needed to DEFINITIVELY determine what is causing this <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> upper respiratory congestion, nose swelling/sore? Thanks <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> any GOOD answers.
Our research has found that high doses of Propofol used in critically ill patients in combination with glucocorticoids (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span>) can cause the syndrome. We gave <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> twice daily <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a week before the Propofol was administered. So we are also curious what a normal dosage range of Propofol is for a 5.5lb cat? This was administered because they had to thoroughly inspect the mouth area and she did not want that to happen. It is squeamous cell carcinoma being treated.
It might help to use a course of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span>, antibiotics (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> secondary skin bacterial infection), anti-fungal treatment, and anti-demodex treatment for those secondary factors if necessary while the Atopica kicks in. All treatments should of course be under your veterinarian's care. The following link describes a cat with feline alopecia similar to your cat, which you may find edifying: http://www.heska.com/linked_files/VETM36205e_PR.
The vet could perform skin scrapings (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> mites), fungal assay (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> ringworm), blood tests (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> autoimmune disorders and to rule out the other possibilities, and more. Treatments can be given, and some treatments are also diagnostic, for instance: If a steroid such as prednisolone is given to your cat, and he improves, than we can determine that it is not behavioral, or demodex, or food allergy. prednisolone helps with flea allergy dermatitis, and can help slightly for some of the others.
Prednisone should work as well as prednisolone in your boxer. <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> is more important in <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span>. The dose of Artemisinin is 200mg daily <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a boxer sized dog. We use Allergy research or NutriCology brands at my practice. If your dog is currently taking more than 200mg and there are no side effects than continue with the higher dose. If he is taking less than gradually increase to the 200mg dose. There are many other additional holistic options to consider.
So we will see how that goes. She was tested earlier in the year <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the basic allergies like to <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span>, dogs, eggs etc and they all came back negative. Maybe I will have her tested again.
the safest brand <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> is by Thorne Research #12 veggie capsules, its the purest form and has no additives that are unsafe for cats, ie: soy, yeast and flavorings. the recommended dosage I have found is 1/4 capsule for 1 lb of food, which breaks down to 1/16 per 4oz feeding. you would need a 1/8 of a teaspoon measurement and fill only 1/2 full. I haven't heard of myasthenia gravis, but again follow your Vet's recommendations. I do hope kitties recover quickly.
Just yesterday I took my two <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> to the vet <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> their yearly shots. Both are perfectly healthy (and majorly spoiled) cats, but they're as different as night and day. One is as nice as can be at the vet, she just stands there and lets them do whatever they need to. The other gets scared, and growls and hisses. I know that cat, so I know that any damage she could actually inflict on the vets wouldn't be much at all. She acts tough when scared, but she's still the pushover I know and love.
Thanks <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> the comment. I am seeing a feline Neurologist today. I've been doing much research online and just seem to find much higher dosages of these drugs being dispensed for cats with similar problems. My vet seems to be afraid of liver toxicity. My understanding is that if that should happen it would be a distant event and the cat may not have long to go.
I don't know the weight of your kitty? <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a 11 lb. cat..(6kg) <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> instance the dosage can be 1 mg per kg. therefore up to 6mgs. but of course all that depends on what the treatment is for and health of your kitty. what are you treating???? please consult with your Vet... http://www.drugs.com/vet/prednisolone-5-mg-tablets-can.
i was prescribed a 'science diet' variety <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> one of my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span>. you can also try baby food or a high calorie food supplement that you can probably find at your pet supply store. but, I'd ask your vet about a prescription for some of the high calorie food.
It is extremely common <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> to get aural hematoma's over and over again if the inciting problem is not controlled. Inciting problems can be food or environmental allergies causing susceptibility to yeast or bacterial ear infections, ear mites, and less commonly, ear foreign bodies. If the inciting cause cannot be determined it would be best to stop the itching and pain using prednisolone or other steroids antihistamines, topical ear medication.
5mg twice daily <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a week, 5mg once daily <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a week, then 2.5mg once daily <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> a week, 2.5mg every other day for a week, and so on until we were back down to the 1.25mg every other day. The prednisone did not seem effective, so we switched to prednisolone. In any case, for about 2 months Hudson was on a very high dosage of these anti-inflammatories. He developed diabetes and pancreatitis and had to be hospitalized for 10 days!
She should be put on <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> in a tapering dose schedule, and Atopica (immune-modulator <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> food and other allergies) simultaneously. Atopica takes one month to kick in. She may need Atopica long term to prevent recurrence. 8. She should be concurrently treated with oral antibiotics and either an oral anti-fungal medication, or medicated anti-fungal shampoo. She may need these medications for one month or more. 9.
images and copies of lab reports would be helpful. I also find great success in using probiotics <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> with chronic diarrhea.
Wysolone is a cousin to prednisolone and helps to reduce your liver inflamation [swelling]. It's also used to treat animal [dogs and cats] problems. The bad thing is it's classified as steroid. The more you take, the higher it will raise your glucose levels. The longer you take it, the higher the risk of constant elevated glucose. Depending on how well your post OP recovery goes, you probably will be weaned off of prednisolone.
If you are using plastic bowls for the food or water please switch to ceramic or stainless steel. Dry food is no longer considered the optimal type of food <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span>. In the wild, the best food for a cat is a few mice, or fish or birds per day. Since cats originated as desert animals they derived all their liquid from their prey. It has been recently noted that cats still do not drink enough water to support an all dry diet. Additionally, cats bodies have no requirement for grains.
I have 4 <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> ages 3 and 4 years old. 8 months ago, one came down with inflamed gums/tongue and the rest soon followed. The first one has never been outdoors. All 4 of the cats mothers were tested for FIV shortly after giving birth to them when I went to have them spayed, and the tests returned negative. I tried using Amoxicillan to no avail on them. I wrote in to you and you suggested to try Clindamycin or another drug. I took two of them into the vet to get the Clindamycin.
Our kitty wears a collar all the time now (consistent wear <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> 1 + month at this point). When we removed it, he licked both areas to bloody. Our vet has quoted us $2000 for a biopsy to ascertain the nature of the lesion, which we can't afford. $500 worth of blood lab work reveals no abnormality. Urinalysis shows crystals. The vet took a guess that the lesions may be eosinophillic granuloma complex and treated the kitty with oral prednisolone, tapering dose. Unfortunately, the lesions persist.
prednisone is a steroid as you know, it is used to reduce inflammation and is often used to treat tumors, but it does have its side effects too. a better choice <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>cats</span> is <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> I will send you some info on that the last line states "data indicates oral prednisolone is a superior choice for cats" this too is a steroid and has side effects....diabetes being one.
And only <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>prednisolone</span> has worked perfectly but like others it just doesnt work <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>for</span> long enough the redness comes back because it has to stop. erm ive been told by 2 experts at moorfields eye hospital in london its Allergic conjunctivitus and i dont want to doubt them but then i saw episcleritus and scleritis on here and got scared a little because they affect vision?
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