Pneumonia recovery collapsed lung

Common Questions and Answers about Pneumonia recovery collapsed lung


Nicole I am no doctor - but I have done lots of research on Nodules - from what I have read - most <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> nodules are benign. I would not worry - sounds like you doctor is right - beneign lung nodules - I also have many scattered nodules - and if these were going to kills me - I should be dead by now..........mine are also up to 7mm .... small nodules are almost always benign..........stop worrying and enjoy your life. Life is precious - we need to enjoy what we have ........
5lt of fluid over 24 hours. I had a partially <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> afterwards due to the fluid damage, but have recovered fairly well since. I've been back for a few chest xrays since which show improvement, but my doctor says I have permanent scar tissue and may only get back to 90-95%. Its now almost 10 months later, and I've been training for my first marathon. My chest has largely been okay, though every now and I think it gets inflamed and I'll feel uncomfortable after I've gone for a run.
I do not know which of the T's she had to obtain this biopsy. Her <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> and she contacted <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span> soon after the procedure. I do not know if these side effects of a lung biopsy is normal or a rare occurance.
His oxygen levels are good (they were even good when his <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> though), Peak flow is good and he doesn't seem too out of breath when walking. The Dr puts his throat issues down to a vocal cord dysfunction/emotional response but he is not convinced by this explanation. Please can anyone give me some advice about whether my husbands symptoms are to be expected? Or some tips on recovery?
It is so early in his recovery and you, your husband and your daughter have a lot to look forward to. Although your husband isn't a spring chicken he's not all that old, either, and that will help his recovery. You will be amazed at how he bounces back. My husband (56 at the time) had a stroke last July and he has problems with his eyes. He has developed double vision. He, at first, was paralyzed on his left side but all that came back. He's almost back to his old self.
I'm wondering how paralysis recovery works? She has physio and Occupational therapy working her muscles but do people with paralysis get some motor function back and if so what type of time frame (3,6,12, months?)Is there any recent research or therapy to aid in the motor recovery process such as magnetic stimulation or emg that we should be considering or inquiring about? Any questions I should be asking the rehab or dr.'s to find out about my mother's prognosis for it....
He had major complications after surgery and a ventilator had to be put back in. He developed <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span> and a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>. We later found out that x-rays were taken and the wiring had sliced through his sternum and broke bones. Surgery had to be scheduled on 9/30/15 and he was rewired. Today is only 10/2/15 and he is still on the ventilator and not sure of the outcome. Doctors tell us to be cautiously optimistic.
I just had to go back to the hospital today because I thought I had a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>. They said it was pluracy. Has anyone else been diagnosed with pluracy when they had whooping cough?
2, 2006 after a ct scan I was told the cause was blebs that had burst and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>. My surgeon informed me that I needed surgery to remove the dead part of the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> (which turned out to be half of the lung). The surgery involved removing the dead lung and scraping the remaining lung so that when it healed it would heal to the chest wall, as not to have another collapse. Also, the lung expanded to fill the void of the removed lung, except for a very small portion.
Prior, I also had coughing and was treated for pneumonia and my right lower <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> had <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span>. I had/have exteme difficulty laying flat on my back. I'm just wondering if others have had the difficulty in being diagnosed and what further optins they have had. It has seemed to me hopeless in geting any further understanding, treatment, from my DR. It seems I have no way of making them understand the "difficulty in breating" the "shortness of breath" the discomfort.
Later that morning, my breathing never let up and finally I just <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span>. I was taken to another ER, where they discovered that my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> had collapsed for an unknown reason. A few weeks after I got out of the hospital, my symptoms persisted. I made an appointment with a pulminologist, and he came to the conclusion that it must be my esaphogus spasming. He gave me a prescription for Prevacid, and sent me on my way. Here we are a month later, and today my symptoms returned.
Went to my regular doctor the following afternoon and had some type of xray/mri with dye and it showed <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span> in my right <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>, right long 20% <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> and evidence of COPD (which is why I immediately quit smoking) My primary had me admitted to the hospital immediately, was there for 7 or 8 days, received breathing treatments, more leviquin and some steroids.
Now they are concerned she may have pulmonary embolisms and yesterday her <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span>. Do you have any idea who I can contact who may have more answers???? I am being told to prepare myself for losing her and although I don't want her to suffer I don't want to lose her, Please if you can help me in any way please contact me!!!
After a needle biopsy it might not be a good idea to fly the same day, but if there aren't any complications it's probably ok to fly in a couple of days. However, pneumothorax (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>) is a common complication of a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> needle biopsy, and if you have a collapsed lung, you definitely can't fly until it's completely healed. The doctor should explain this to you. I hope your husband has good scan results. Take care, and keep us posted.
The first surgery I suffered a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>. I'm afraid to eat anything now, and in fact haven't had anything to eat at all today. I'm freaking out. Can anybody tell me anything about a Nissan Fundoplasty the second time around? Email me at ***@**** - Thanks!
His left <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> is <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span>. So we're praying he stays stable and doesn't need a chest tube.
We do not yet know if her cancer is the cause of death, or if it was infection and inflammation due to her last chemo treatment causing her to go from <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span> recovery into a relapse of pneumonitis (extremely severe <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span>) and/or ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome). A focal autopsy has been conducted on her lungs and we should have an answer in a week or two. But it doesn't really matter.
At this point I had started to hit the vics pretty hard to escape the stress of what he was doing and that coupled with the stress of one of the worst binges he had been on ended up with me in the hospital with weeks old untreated pneumonia (that I didnt' know I had) and a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>. Once I came thru surgery and off the ventilator 10 days later, I just let my mom know everything, I pretty much had nothing left eventually had to file Chapter 13.
At least she's moving in the right direction! Your vet is right about the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> not being the worst medical issue Hope is having. The brain damage is the more important thing to worry about. The lung could be not able to inflate because of blood surrounding, a hole in the lung itself, or if the lung is "bruised", it's just constantly leaking blood which makes it unable to fill with air. The other lung can carry on for a while as the other one hopefully heals.
Doghound is right, you can't always save a person who has respiratory edema, because even if you are Ambu bagging them in an ambulance/ER, the O2 still can't get through the waterlogged <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> tissue. The other way a person who has overdosed can drown is if they throw up while they are passed out. It's a hideous way to die, because even if they are rescued, after a week or two they can die of bacterial pneumonia from aspiration.
I continued to smoke off and on until I suffered a pneumothorax(<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>) innovember 2009. I felt minor pain in my chest but could feel the air escaping from my lungs. I did not want to alarm my wife so I drove for about ten minutes and then pulled into a lot and called 911. The fire department paramedics arrived in about five minutes and an ambulance in a few minutes after. By the time we reached the hospital, I was unconcious.
The types of sweats I am having are typical of infectios <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> diseases (<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span>, TB etc). I wish I knew how to get that virus out of my body. I am taking echinacea, goldenseal, astragalus, olive leaf extract and more - all antiviral. There haven't been much improvement.
(Age 11-20) Chicken Pox, kidney infection, UTI's, Sinus/Ear Infections, pneumonia, Bronchitis, Strep, Viruses, Asthma Diagnosed, Unknown Intestinal Infection that kept me in the hospital for 4 days, Ruptured Appendix and surgery one month later, <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> as complication from <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span>, Gestational Diabetes that was controlled with a strict diet and frequent glucose monitoring, C-section due to baby size and being breach, Menses began at age 12 but were extremely painful, heavy and alway
one to remove a nodule caused from Valley Fever which they thought could be cancer, and the second to repair a fistula caused from the Valley Fever fungus still in my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> which became activated and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> my <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>. I still have unbelievable pain a year later and also go to a pain specialist. They are trying several meds, although Percocet works OK along with a nerve med. Lyrica put on weight and gave me a headache so we need to look for something else.
Its the goverment spraying chemicals from airplanes thats putting particles into the air thats irritating and infecting the lungsAcute respiratory distress syndrome Bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsy Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Coal worker's lungs - chest x-ray Coal worker's pneumoconiosis <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>, pneumothorax Diaphragm and lungs Heart-and-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> transplant Incision for lung biopsy lung anatomy lung biopsy.
I stayed overnight with intravenous and the whole nine yards. I did have a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> infection at the time. The reason being is I have copd. From what I understand it used to be that 90 was acceptable for an oxygen reading depending on whether you have lung problems smoke etc. Now they want your reading to be 100. That is for a normal person who is in excellent condition non smoker etc. Remember your oxygen level does go up and down daily like your blood pressure depending on your activity level.
I was having severe chest pain, and did not know that I actually had a completely <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span> known as tension pneumothorax, a potentially life threatening condition. I had to have immediate surgery, and was in the hospital for a week. Apparently I have a pretty high pain tolerance, because the doctors couldn't believe I was walking around. I learned my lesson...don't mess around with chest pain, get it checked out. God bless.
She was totally sedated for the first 3 weeks while she had a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>collapsed</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>lung</span>, MRSA <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pneumonia</span>, kidney and liver failure. She pulled through and went to pulmonary rehab. Everyone said she would be fine, but she knew different. She knew she was dying and didn't tell us becasue she didn't want us to worry. Just like a mom, huh? I miss her so much, she is my best friend. I have been strong, but today is a really bad day! I just can't believe that she is gone at 61 years old!