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Pneumonia diagnosis differential

Common Questions and Answers about Pneumonia diagnosis differential

pneumonia

My Father was admitted in to hospital last week following a chest infection which led to pneumonia and heart failure. He has been in hospital for over 10 days and is recovering well. They are due to be sending him home tomorrow, the infection has cleared and virtually all the fluid in his lungs has disappeared, apart from the left lung for which they are going to give him medication.
My bloodAmylase - blood Bleeding Blood cells Blood clot formation Blood clots Blood culture Blood differential Blood gases Blood gases test Blood glucose monitoring Blood in semen test says pneumoniaAtypical pneumonia Chickenpox, acute pneumonia - chest x-ray Hospital-acquired pneumonia Pneumococcal pneumonia Pneumonia Viral pneumonia and the doc says chlamydian pneumonic. I've taken 2 z packs and doxycycline for 2 weeks. I've gotten a little better, but it still persists.
Many asthmatics have compensatory tachycardia, which should not always be treated. The liklihood the virus affected your heart is about as likely as you having been telaported down here at the age of six months by space aliens. Presumably you have the two part echo, one part of which involves swallowing a probe. This is a test for endocarditis. A "one part" test is meaningless. Whenever there is a deficiency of oxygen (low P02) the carotid sensors speed up the heart.
You have reason to be concerned, especially about the diagnosis of pneumonia. You state that the ER doctor detected “congestion in your right lung”.
no medications improvement of dysphagia   One month PTA, Pneumonia (cefuroxime and Azelex). dysphagia with regurgitation (water and food) Patient claimed he have not swallowed any solid and liquid. weight loss + chest pain - epigastric pain good urinary and bowel habits.
I had a CT scan the other day and it showed a 9mm nodular opacity in the superior segment of the left lower lung. Differential diagnosis includes early pneumonia, focal pneumonitis, scarring and early developing neoplasm. Given history of smoking , 3 follow-up chest CT is recommended to document stability/resolution. My question is how long do I wait to take the next CT? My family doctor says do one a year. What is your opinion? I'm really concerned about the possibility of cancer.
These illnesses need separate testing and often different antibiotics to cure. The sooner diagnosis and treatment are begun, the less entrenched the diseases are, and the less compromised your immune system becomes from fighting the infection(s) without antibiotic assistance. Your doc means well, but Lyme is a fast-changing area of medicine, and not all docs are trained or aware enough to do what needs to be done. If you need help finding a Lyme specialist in your area, let us know.
Still waiting diagnosis new CT every 3 months. Pneumonia resolved now back to low grade flue like symptoms I've had over a year and a half. Night sweats, rash body aches, malaise and exhaustion. Nothing to major. How long before any of you actually got a diagnosis, I feel it's hard to move on with this in the back of my mind. Thanks, I have 3 CT scan reports here I haven't paid all that much attention to just kind of random.
And only a differential diagnosis can be obtained from this. Further additional testing like CT scan, tumor markers or PET scan may further help in the evaluation. But a confirmed diagnosis of cancer can only be made with a histopathological study, which is the study of the cells, which is done on the biopsy of the lesion. So, after therapy with antibiotics, a repeat X ray may be needed to see for resolution of the lung lesion, if it is due to pneumonia.
But from imaging studies alone, it is difficult to make an exact diagnosis. It can only be differential. Tuberculosis heals by fibrosis. But an acute infection can cause a pneumonic patch. So, you will only have to wait and watch, if it does not resolve after six weeks, you may need a biopsy. A biopsy facilitates a histologic study of cells, which gives you a definite diagnosis. So once you have the diagnosis you will know what measures or precautions you need to follow. Good Luck.
In addition abnormal pleural based densities also noted along the peripheral portion of the left upper lobe. Differential diagnosis to be considered should include neoplastic lung process versus inflammatory lesion. No pleural effusion or pneumothorax noted. Visualized liver and adrenals appear unremarkable IMPRESSION: 1. No evidence of pulmonary embolism noted 2. Spiculated nodular mass in the left upper lung with pleural based nodules with scattered nodular densities in left upper lung.
X rays are images and can show radiolucent or opaque shadows. And only a differential diagnosis can be obtained from this. The shadow can occur due to local causes like recurrent lung infections and sometimes due to cancer of the lungs. They can also be seen in systemic diseases like systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis and scleroderma. Only further investigations like a CT or PET scan and sometimes a biopsy may be needed to arrive at a diagnosis.
The differential diagnosis would include:
Dear Dr My dad was admitted to the Hospital after neglecting a cold, which later (in hospital) developed into a Pneumonia - I should probably mention that he also has COPD and was diagnosed and treated for Tuberculosis for 6 months in 2007 - He was initially treated with Broad spectrum IV Antibiotics but only seemed to get worse.
sorry, i forgot to say that she had anemia and her ferritin level was below 10 and after taking the oral iron supplementation, it increased to 40
Hi Thanks for the post. Any mass in the lung is not cancer. “The differential diagnosis for patients who present with abnormalities on chest x-ray includes lung cancer, as well as nonmalignant diseases. These include infectious causes such as tuberculosis or pneumonia, or inflammatory conditions such as sarcoidosis. These diseases can result in mediastinal lymphadenopathy or lung nodules, and sometimes mimic lung cancers.
Dear Dr. Goodman, My 94 year old mom lost 12% of her body weight after she was hospitalized for pneumonia for 2 weeks back in April of this year. She is down to 80 lbs she is 4''9" tall. She has been on a high protein diet and eating 3 meals a day and has not gained it back. Her doctor did an abdominal and pelvic ultrasound and found a 6.5x6.0x3.1 cm right adnexal cystic mass without peristalsis. It was a complex cycstic mass with solid echogenic components as well.
The findings you describe are consistent with the diagnosis of pulmonary Histoplasmosis and, yes, the pneumonia your daughter had a year ago may have been a Histoplasma infection. In that case the current CT scan findings could be the residual of that pneumonia. Histoplasmosis is endemic in the entire Ohio river valley and beyond, in the Midwest. The diagnosis can be either strongly suggested or confirmed by serologic testing.
1 to 1.2 cm in maximum diameter. The differential diagnosis would include focal pnuemonitis. However the possibility of neoplasm cannot be totally excluded 3) essentially normal liver and adrenals and no evidence of pleural effusion I am scheduled to see the pulmonologist next week, but I am wondering if there is anything to worry about. Could this just mean I have scar tissue from past infections? Does it mean I have interstitial lung disease?
Still waiting diagnosis new CT every 3 months. Pneumonia resolved now back to low grade flue like symptoms I've had over a year and a half. Night sweats, rash body aches, malaise and exhaustion. Nothing to major. How long before any of you actually got a diagnosis, I feel it's hard to move on with this in the back of my mind. Thanks, I have 3 CT scan reports here I haven't paid all that much attention to just kind of random.
people with immunodeficiency get the same kind of infection that others get, ear infections, sinusitis and pneumonia but with increased frequency, more severe and greater complication risk. These do not go away without using antibiotics and recur within few weeks after antibiotic therapy. there is predisposition of infection injoints, bones, liver etc. You can run a complete blood workup including blood cell counts particularly white cells and differential counts.
Neck-tongue syndrome may also be included in the differential diagnosis. Neurontin (gabapentin) or pregablin may also be effective for neuralgia. Further consultation with your neurologist is advised.
he is currently taking aspirin, Toprol, Coumadin and Effient plus Avelox (anti-biotic for bad case of pneumonia). He isnt complaining currently and hardly ever complains, hence 1/3 of his heart is dead because according to his enzyme levels, he was having heart attacks weeks prior to being diagnosed. We thought the slight warning signs were that of the pneumonia. Anyhow, this morning after shortly after eating a small bowl of cereal, he complained of having upper stomach, lower rib pains.
Moderate, restrictive ventilatory defect without defined bronchdilator responsiveness. Would anticipate significant symptomatology on the basis of thes PFT's. Remarkable preservation of DLCO suggests that this is not interstitial lung disease. End of report. His physical history: sleep apnea (presently not being treated), PVD, obesity, partial colectomy (perforation of the colon 1993), appendectomy (due to the perforated colon), shortening of enlongnated toes-(1990's).
You might have Acute Bronchitis, or maybe something else. See: http://www.aafp.org/afp/980315ap/hueston.html Acute Bronchitis Excerpts: "Differential Diagnosis Many conditions other than acute bronchitis present with cough (Table 1). Acute bronchitis or pneumonia can present with fever, constitutional symptoms and a productive cough. ..........................
Hi, What you describe could be a fungal infection of the lungs or a carcinoma. But most probably it looks to be a fungal infection - aspergillus infection called ABPA - allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis or even an aspergilloma. You need to discuss these possibilities with your chest physician and see what he has to say.
trigeminal neuralgia, pyramidal tract signs (right babinski, hyperreflexive on right). I have a differential diagnosis of some sort of rare CNS vasculitis. Now this week I'm having stabbing pains when I breathe which escalate to pain all around, on the left. Ruled out -- tumour/cancer/pneumonia/muscle strain/pulmonary embolism/asthma. I have mentioned ms hug to my doctor, but he is obligated to rule out serious stuff.
Another possibility is that you were have seizures, not the seizures that cause convulsions, but rather either myoclonus or confusional episodes. This seems less likely but is still on the differential diagnosis. I do recommend that you be evaluated by a neurologist if your arm jerks persist and/or if you have other symptoms, so that the cause can be searched for, and also, if you did have a new stroke on your MRI, to ensure you are on the appropriate stroke-prevention therapies.
Acute bronchiolitis is mainly a viral disease. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes more than 50% of cases. Bronchiolitis can also be due to parainfluenza, adenovirus, Mycoplasma, and occasionally other viruses. Recovery usually takes 7 to 10 days. Antibiotics do not treat viral infections. There is no evidence that bacteria are a cause. However this may be followed by a bacterial infection. Antibiotics do treat bacterial infections.
CSF CELL COUNT & DIFFERENTIAL 8/4/2008 CSF - APPEAR CLEAR CSF - WBC 0 CSF - RBC 1023 CSF - DIFF DIFF NOT INDICATED CSF CHEMISTRIES GLU # 40 - 70 69 LACTIC 0.0 - 2.8 2.1 LDH >=0 10 PROTEIN 15.0 - 45.0 25.8 CSF CULTURE MODERATE RED BLOOD CELLS / NO ORGANISMS SEEN MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS EVAL DATE RECEIVED 8-5-08 DATE REPORTED 8-9-08 IGG SERUM 768 - 1632 1060 IGG CSF 0.0 - 6.0 3.0 ALBUMIN SERUM 3500 - 5200 4160 ALBUMIN CSF 0 - 35 17 ALBUMIN INDEX 0.0 - 9.0 4.
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