Pica eating disorder non food

Common Questions and Answers about Pica eating disorder non food

eating

Avatar_f_tn The causes of Pica are unknown, however, certain situations may increase the risk to it such as nutritional deficiencies of iron or zinc (the nonfood items craved usually do not supple the minerals lacking in the body), malnutrition (seen in underdeveloped countries where people will eat clay or soil), development problems (mental disabilities, and autism) and mental health conditions (obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia).
Avatar_n_tn When I told his doctor about him eating dirt over a year ago he said it was a phase, but he is still <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> things, and it is getting worse. I took him to an herbalist for allergies and she diagnosed him with pica and started him on a powder, but it didn't help. What do I do? I am so afraid he is going to get sick from all the stuff he eats, esp. the drywall!! HELP!!! This discussion is related to <a href='/posts/show/276697'>shirt chewing</a>.
Avatar_f_tn Pica is an eating disorder which children and adults eat non-food objects.
770635_tn?1237339479 I think it could be related to an <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing disorder called pica, which is a compulsion to eat non-food items, such as dirt, chalk, paint chips, etc. The disorder is generally associated with a nutrient deficiency, which results in cravings for non-food items. I haven't heard too much about people's struggles with this particular eating disorders, so I am not sure how long it typically lasts, or exactly how it is treated. Sorry, I know that isn't much help.
1144298_tn?1261289535 There is an eating disorder called 'Pica' which children and adults eat <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> objects. Pica occurs more frequently with children.
Avatar_f_tn So I've had PICA (the disorder where you craving <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> items) with all my pregnancies. Its always been brown paper towels. But this pregnancy seems to be the worst so far. I crave the brown paper towels none stop. Does anyone have thought on how to make the cravings go away?
Avatar_f_tn It is a psychiatric disorder under the anxiety umbrella in the DSM 4. It involves <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> items such as dirt, rocks, ashes, hair, or whatever. Hope this helps.
Avatar_f_tn Also, get your iron levels checked. Ice craving is a symptom of anemia.
Avatar_n_tn There is an eatting disorder called Pica, where people eat things that aren't food. Usually, this is caused by some kind of deficancy (like iron or a vitamin) that the person isn't absorbing, for whatever reason, so they crave the other things that aren't food to try to satisfy those needs for whatever they're missing. You're going to want to get your child to a doctor to get your granddaughter to a doctor to be officially diagnosed.
Avatar_f_tn The causes of Pica are unknown, however, certain situations may increase the risk to it such as nutritional deficiencies of iron or zinc (the nonfood items craved usually do not supple the minerals lacking in the body), malnutrition (seen in underdeveloped countries where people will eat clay or soil), development problems (mental disabilities, and autism) and mental health conditions (obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia).
Avatar_n_tn however, they do not usually eat them. Consumption of some <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> object maybe harmless, however, Pica is considered a serious <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing disorder that may result in serious health issues such as lead poisoning and iron deficiency anemia. I am not saying he has Pica, but strongly suggest he be seen by his MD and get checked.
Avatar_f_tn Though not uncommon, pica can cause serious health complications for both you and your baby. What is Pica? Pica is an <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing disorder that causes you to crave <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> items. Pica literally means "magpie," a bird that has undiscerning tastes. People affected by this disorder are compelled to eat things that are not generally intended for consumption. During pregnancy, some women develop cravings for these non-food items.
Avatar_n_tn Hi, Pica is a disorder found in toddlers and children who crave or eat <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> substances, like rocks, clay, hair, etc. Other children with pica eat paper, cardboard, or even the stuffing from furniture. You can’t say that people who have pica are “weird”. Its just a alteration in eating behaviors which cause craving. A psychologist or a psychiatrist can help you getting rid of this habit.
Avatar_f_tn Give her regular fruit instead. There is an <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing disorder called 'Pica' which children eat <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> objects. Pica occurs more frequently with children.
Avatar_m_tn The causes of Pica are unknown, however, certain situations may increase the risk to it such as nutritional deficiencies of iron or zinc (the nonfood items craved usually do not supple the minerals lacking in the body), malnutrition (seen in underdeveloped countries where people will eat clay or soil), development problems (mental disabilities, and autism) and mental health conditions (obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia).
Avatar_n_tn The causes of Pica are unknown, however, certain situations may increase the risk to it such as nutritional deficiencies of iron or zinc (the nonfood items craved usually do not supple the minerals lacking in the body), malnutrition (seen in underdeveloped countries where people will eat clay or soil), development problems (mental disabilities, and autism) and mental health conditions (obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia).
Avatar_n_tn eating non-food objects such as comet cleanser could be an eating disorder called “Pica”.
Avatar_f_tn asap and stop eating chalk! There is a disorder called pica that will make you eat <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> but it can be bad for you and baby. You need to let your Dr. know and they will figure out what vit.
Avatar_f_tn I should mention the ladies commenting about weird <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> cravings...however weird they may seem,they're normal to some extent! <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> is pica. It's not great for you at all. Lint is a fairly common one too. Seriously,Google it. I'm not trying to make fun of anyone,or hurt anyone's feelings, just trying to help!
1441076_tn?1284072673 The causes of Pica are unknown, however, certain situations may increase the risk to it such as nutritional deficiencies of iron or zinc (the nonfood items craved usually do not supple the minerals lacking in the body), malnutrition (seen in underdeveloped countries where people will eat clay or soil), development problems (mental disabilities, and autism) and mental health conditions (obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia).
Avatar_f_tn I'm sorry, but that is not what Pica is. Pica is a pattern of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing or craving <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span>-<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> materials such as dirt or paper (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002505/) .
Avatar_f_tn Its a rare <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing disorder. Your body is looking for ways to get a certain mineral into it. I know some women it it but what in the world does it taste like? Good luck darlin'. Definitely go see your doctor about that?
1194973_tn?1385507504 You need to speak to your doctor. The urge to eat <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> items is called Pica and it's a legitimate medical condition. Some women develop this during pregnancy when they had weird cravings. Speak with your obgyn about what you can do about this. It's very important that you speak with the doc becuase chances are if you are craving one non food item, you will crave more and it could eventually get so bad you give in.
1379808_tn?1279331310 I don't know if its a form of physical restlessness from ocd or another psychiatric disability, a physical desire to eat things that are non nutritious (there is a category for this called PICA, that's why a doctor should be informed as well) or since you are concerned about gaining weight and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing things that are <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span> nutritious and should not be eaten instead, some form of an <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>eat</span>ing disorder.
Avatar_n_tn The name is Pica and is a disorder in which a person has a strong desire to eat, lick, or chew non-food items. These items consist of dirt, paint chips, rust, glue, fingernails, hair, chalk, starch, cigarette ashes and clay. This disorder is common is pregnant women, small children, people with mineral deficiencies and those in developing countries who may not get enough to eat.
Avatar_f_tn You know, sometimes children start to chew/ eat <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>non</span> <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>food</span> items ( called pica) and its not psychological-- there are some medical causes for this ( I can't recall them right now, but I know that they exist.) If this is a habit he just picked up two weeks ago, even if it is an anxiety reaction -- something must have changed to make him do this-- either him or his environment. I bet the pediatrician will be able to tell you lots-- but are you going soon?