Pacemaker procedure risks

Common Questions and Answers about Pacemaker procedure risks

pacemaker

Placement of a pacemaker in a person your father's age carries much the same risks as in any other patient including infection, bleeding, arrhythmia, pneumothorax. Im certain that they did more extensive testing to assure that he would benefit from the procedure. The controversy about doing it in someone of your fathers age is offered by those who suggest that the cost of the procedure does not outweigh the potential years of use.
My mother-in-law, who will be 95 is April, was recently hospitalized has several episodes of arrhythmia at the hospital. the doctor recommends a pacemaker. What are the pros and cons of someone her age to have a pacemaker implanted?
DEAR DOCTOR, I have undergone 6years ago a mitral valve raplacement and..unsuccessful Maze procedure to cure my Atrial fibrilation.Maybe the left unlarged atrium,(5,3 )whas the raison for this failling procedure i don't know... I took different antyarhitmic drugs and have had some elecrtical cardioversion having only some short atrial fib event... One day i stoped the amiodarone treatment because thyreotoxicosis; Later Propafenone helped me for a while..
In weighing my risks, is my risk of death or serious complication lessened if my arrythmia is AVNRT and if I am young(30) and healthy? In considering drug therapy (ie. digoxin, beta blockers), are there actual risks from long term use that I should be considering? Are there statistical "risks of death" from medication that I could compare to the numerical "risk of death" from an abaltion?
1) What are the risks of this procedure and success rate of a cardiac ablation? 2) If I were to get pregnant (and decide to not get the procedure done) what are the risks to the baby, to myself (also can I still get an epidural?), and how can anyone really say what the risks would be to my child (since it is only animal tests that have been done)? Any information you can give me would be helpful.
Pacemaker battery (pulse generator) changes are pretty straight forward. Depending on how often some one needs paced and the current required to capture the heart muscle, pacemaker batteries should last 6-10 years, sometimes longer, sometimes shorter. An incision is made over the previous scar and the old pacemaker is removed from the pocket. A small screw driver is used to disconnect the leads from the pulse generator and the leads are tested to make sure they are working properly.
The doctor told us that she may need a pacemaker. We are worry about all the risks implied during and after the procedure, specially because of her age. She is also depressed after being in the hospital and we are not sure she can go through this emotionally. Thanks for your advice.
Having a device extracted and re-implanted on the opposite side carries the same risks as your initial surgical implantation. This is a procedure that is done often for a number of different reasons (including yours). It should be carried out by an electrophysiologist with the appropriate pre-procedural testing to ensure there are no vascular problems on the side they plan on re-implanting the device.
His cardiologist wants to make the heart completely dependent upon the pacemaker, as the medicines my father is on aren't working. Unfortunately, I was unable to sit in on the meeting between my father and the cardiologist. My question to you is this - do you know the name of the procedure that would fully sever the nerves which incite the heart to beat?
Risks of Pacemaker Surgery •Nerve damage at the incision site •Damage to the tissues or blood vessels around the heart or the incision site •Pneumothorax (collapsed lung) •Bruising at the site of placement (this is an expected effect of surgery) •Faulty pacemaker that does not function as intended after the surgery (very rare) •Faulty lead wires that connect the pacemaker to the heart (very rare) •Lead wires that become dislodged after surgery due to activity or poor placement.
Low energy. Should I undergoe a full maze procedure (little confidence) or a pacemaker. My heart rate is usually low 40's when not in tachycardia. Would my ventrical beat keep me alive if pacemaker failed. Is this risky?
Both my cardiologist and the consulting EP say an Ablation has a low probability of success, and it does entail risks, so they will not do that procedure on me. I'm sure I can find a doctor that will, but I have decided to live with the AFib. I'm just a bit younger than your father, I am 71 and the only 6-pack I have is one I buy at the beer story.
I'm supposed to have my ICD leads looked at and repaired/replaced and been warned of the risks - the procedure is pretty risky and can cause all kinds of complications. I would speak to an attorney in your area to see about medical malpractice and to subpeona her records to see what happened. If you don't do that I would at least send a complaint to the medical board who governs the hospital/doctors and make sure they are made aware of the complications.
I didn't feel a thing, I slept through the whole procedure. I wish to ask, if anyone has a pacemaker implanted under the sedation? Did you wake up in the middle of the procedure? Did you feel pain or uncomfort during the procedure? Or you slept through the whole procedure without knowing anything? Why they only let me choose from either local or general anesthetic? Is there a sedation performed during this kind of procedure?
I was awake the whole time and though I was stressed initially to do it I found out it really wasn't any worse than getting an iv put in so really quite an easy procedure for the patient most of the time. There are risks to doing it as with any medical procedure but I believe for most typical run of the mill congenital svts the complication rate is like 2%. So very low risk with a very high cure rate, especially if you have the most common type, avnrt.
The cardiologist there said that he needed to replace his 8 year old pacemaker. Obviously, the operation would require transportation to a hospital. Does this make sense? Is the risk of an adverse outcome outweight the risk of not having the operation performed? Thanks for your thoughts on this.
I have A-FIb, I have been on coumadin for over five years, I have cardiomyopathy, I have a pacemaker/defibrillator. Recently I had a CAT-scan that indicated a blood clot around the pacemaker wires in a vein leading to the superior vena cava vein back to the heart. I had symptoms: swelling in the face and neck, extended veins on the chest, etc. I was in the hospital for several days and the symptoms above subsided.
I’ve had A Fib since 9/11/02 3 years ago I had a pacemaker installed and was to receive ablation but suffered a heart attack and had to have 6 bypasses. As of the first of May this year, 3 years after the bypass I have gone into almost continuos AFib this has made me very weak and sick most of the time. The pacemaker does not seem to help. I am 75, was very active physically and now am an invalid. Is it possible to have the ablation to stop the AFib rogue heartbeat, given my history.
In general an EP study by itself is very safe and has very low risks. Ablation is an additional procedure and has some increased risks but is still in general safe. Here is some more information about ablations. Dear Kat, Thank you for your question. Ablations are practically pain free (think going to the dentist). A relaxing medication similar to valium is sometimes given and can have some amnestic properties but this is not the reason it is given.
1) Which companies make the device? I am aware of only Avery Biomedical Devices. 2) Which institutions perform the implant procedure? 3) Is this an experimental device or procedure? I have heard that it is available in only two states. 4) Are there better devices, more effective or lower cost treatments available overseas (outside USA)? 5) What are the immediate and long-term risks? 6) Special insurance issues? eg if it's an experimental procedure, etc.
1) Which companies make the device? I am aware of only Avery Biomedical Devices. 2) Which institutions perform the implant procedure? 3) Is this an experimental device or procedure? I have heard that it is available in only two states. 4) Are there better devices, more effective or lower cost treatments available overseas (outside USA)? 5) What are the immediate and long-term risks? 6) Special insurance issues? eg if it's an experimental procedure, etc.
I know from researching on-line that this is a relatively quick and simple procedure with minimal risks. Both my dad and I are nervous about the procedure. I am hoping I can receive some positive reassurances that this is the right thing for him to do to improve his quality of life. My dad is stubborn and thinks he does not have too long to live so why bother with the procedure.
Your story ads credibility to the concern that the ablation procedure carries risks. My Cardo and the consulting EP refuse to do an ablation on my permanent AFib saying my symptoms are not severe enough to justify the risks associated with AFib ablation.
Having said that, I would hesitate to tell you that medical therapy should be bypassed in lieu of a procedure, ie pacemaker. Although a pacer does seem like a valid option, recognizing that a pacer carries risks, including infection, vessel thromboses, pacer wire fracture. Have a detailed conversation with your cardiologist after he reviews your test results. Keep an open mind and trust that staged therapy is often the best option.
Since the pacemaker implantation, I had had increasingly severe PVC's (had them lightly for 25 years), to the point I can't sleep or concentrate. They are almost constant, seldom get two normal beats in a row, much worse lying down. This sometimes causes me to get slightly short of breath in bed. I take Zestril and took Toprol 75mg. Increases in Toprol have made the PVC's worse, so it has been reduced to 25mg. For several years prior, I managed my condition well with diligent exercise.
I have experience with this procedure. I had one after having 4 ablations for AFib and AFlutter. My AVJ (av node) was performed in March 2009. It was the best decision I have made and I would do it all over again. I had just turned 60 when I went through the procedure. I already had a pacer so I did not have to have one implanted at the time. I have since had the pacer switched out as it was time to do so. I am 100% paced and have very little difficulty doing anything I wish to do.
1) Which companies make the device? I am aware of only Avery Biomedical Devices. 2) Which institutions perform the implant procedure? 3) Is this an experimental device or procedure? I have heard that it is available in only two states. 4) Are there better devices, more effective or lower cost treatments available overseas (outside USA)? 5) What are the immediate and long-term risks? 6) Special insurance issues? eg if it's an experimental procedure, etc.
Was sent to the heart hospital where two stents, one bare metal and one drug eluding, were implanted in the LAD. Five days later a pacemaker/defibrillator was implanted. The next week I was hospitalized for a blood clot near the area of the implant, then back into hospital for AFib, after which I had an infected right arm from the IV. Three months ago I had a very infected left breast, also many cysts-- which is not unusual for me. One small one has debris, and a needle biopsy was recommended.
Aside from the collapsed lung which happened to you, other risks during pacemaker procedure include swelling, bleeding, bruising, or infection in the area where the pacemaker was placed or blood vessel or nerve damage. It is important to have regular follow-up appointment with your doctor. He or she will want to check your pacemaker and monitor your response. Take care and keep us posted.
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