Pacemaker insertion site

Common Questions and Answers about Pacemaker insertion site

pacemaker

Advice please. Some 12 years ago I had my first <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion as well as an ABS ablation because I had AF. It was set with a resting pulse of 70. Back in May I had my 3rd replacement and it to was set at 70. However prior to this replacement I had been walking up to 4ks a day quite easily. Then after the new insertion I was unable to get any more than a couple hundred yards. I have been back 4 times for adjustments and the resting pulse it is now set at 60.
He also insisted that I immediately be transported to the hospital for a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span>, that day - before the evening. Once or twice a month, I do feel a bit lightheaded but usually after just standing up quickly, No other symptoms than that. here is what the Dr. noted on my chart "1st deg Blk w/episodes of 2nd deg and 5 Multifocal VE beats & SV beats. Included in the SV Beats were 8 couplets. There were 64 episodes of Bradycardia & 1,763 pauses. Longest pause @ 6.3 secs.
I had a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> inserted on the left side in Dec 11, it became infected and was removed in Feb. 7 days later a new device was placed in the right side, it now appears to be infected. Is it reaction to the metal, the sutures (the incision site has started to open) my skin not healing properly? I underwent 5 days of IV antibiotic and went about 10 days and have now started a 2 week session of daily IV. Where does the 3rd pacemaker get placed?
The pain associated with an implanted pacemaker may be musculoskeletal or nerve related. Most likely related to the minor surgery required for insertion of the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span>. This type of pain related to the incision should heal within weeks. If you have persistent chest pain at the site of the pacemaker, it might be reasonable to see your doctor so that possible causes can be evaluated.
The doctor stated to my father that the Coumadin was related to the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion, but I couldn't think of any reason that clotting would be a danger. Incidently, the day my father was being discharged from the rehab nursing facility, staff drew him aside and said your wife just died. This just reinforces his desire to stay away from the Coumadin.
I subsequently developed a lower atrial <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> and did not require permanent <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion. Within months after the surgery I developed another pacer site high in the superior vena cava which caused tachycardia and then later on junctional tachycardia. 7 years after that I was diagnosed with atrial flutter and av node re-entry tachycardia.
I subsequently developed a lower atrial pacemaker and did not require permanent <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion. Within months after the surgery I developed another pacer <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>site</span> high in the superior vena cava which caused tachycardia and then later on junctional tachycardia. 7 years after that I was diagnosed with atrial flutter and av node re-entry tachycardia.
He currently is completing the planned 2 weeks infusion therapy as an outpatient. What are potential causes of staph infection at <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>site</span> of <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span>? Is a staph infection something that could have entered the body at a point other than the pacemaker insertion then migrated to the pacemaker? Any comments on the current therapy? What are risks of occurrence of infection? What long term therapy, preventive care or monitoring should he anticipate or ask for?
O female who underwent a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion 6 months ago, after 8 weeks of arrythmia and awful pain it was discovered that the ventricular lead had actually perforated my heart and was sitting in the pericardium, hence it was removed (with no dire consequences) except pnuemothorax and paralised arm for 12 hours! I am fully recovered now but still have lots and lots of PVC's and funny thumpings going on, most days this happens for several hours.
Dear Dr. I am a 35 Y.O female who underwent a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion 6 months ago, after 8 weeks of arrythmia and awful pain it was discovered that the ventricular lead had actually perforated my heart and was sitting in the pericardium, hence it was removed (with no dire consequences) except pnuemothorax and paralised arm for 12 hours! I am fully recovered now but still have lots and lots of PVC's and funny thumpings going on, most days this happens for several hours.
Is a staph infection something that could have entered the body at a point other than the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion then migrated to the <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span>? Any comments on the current therapy? What are risks of occurrence of infection? What long term therapy, preventive care or monitoring should he anticipate or ask for? Certainly he doesn't want to go through this every year.
My doctor is planing on repeating the Holter and echo and reccommending that I see an EP doctor in Bethesda (military). I have been told that if I have an ablation, I will most likley need a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span>. I have been dealing with this condition for 1 and a half years and I've come to terms with the idea of a pacemaker because my quality of life right now is poor due to the dyspnea, SOB, activity intolerance etc. My question is ...
I read that a pacemaker is normally the fix for this part? What are your other thoughts on this?
you need to understand that this forum the Medhelp Angina site is a community forum <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>site</span> where the majority of people who respond on this <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>site</span> are people just like yourself that have various medical issues related to the heart. This is not the doctors site. We can offer our opinions of what we ourselves have experienced and also can offer referrals to try to help others and we all have varying professional backgrounds.
I am a 52 year old male in good condition, recently diagnosed with bradycardia after 12 years of intermitant syncope spells that would come in bunches of 6-8 in a day, then nothing for 2 or 3 years. A spell was finally caught on an EKG, an 8 second long pause, followed by a resumption of normal sinus rhythm. A pacemaker was immediately recommended.
In the rare person unable to tolerate medical treatment catheter ablation (burning) of the sinus node with insertion of a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> or surgical removal of the sinus node have been used in the past. Newer techniques are being developed using catheter ablation to modify and not destroy the sinus node thus avoiding the need for a pacemaker. This procedure is still in it's infancy and should only be undertaken at a major medical center after consultation with an electrophysiologist.
I have never experienced anything like the MS Hug and never mentioned it to Seville, but she described it exactly like I've read several members of the MS Forum describe it, but she was attributing it to saying her <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> was firing. When the put a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> in a growing child, they put in extra lead wire so that as they grow there is enough wire to accommodate the extra height. Apparently her s somehow got kinked as this happened.
However, in symptomatic patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia resistant to drug therapy, catheter ablation of the His' bundle with permanent <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion is currently applied. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency modification of the sinus node as alternative therapy for patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia. METHODS and RESULTS: Sixteen patients with disabling episodes of inappropriate sinus tachycardia refractory to drug therapy (4.2 +/- 0.
If using this <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>site</span> by P2K this is a warning that it is not a reliable <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>site</span> for asking health related questions!
I read also that RBBB is less serious than LBBB. but does it mean that I can live without having <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion surgery? I am confused please help me with direct answers. Thanks for your so precious time.
In the rare person unable to tolerate medical treatment catheter ablation (burning) of the sinus node with insertion of a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> or surgical removal of the sinus node have been used in the past. Newer techniques are being developed using catheter ablation to modify and not destroy the sinus node thus avoiding the need for a pacemaker. This procedure is still in it's infancy and should only be undertaken at a major medical center after consultation with an electrophysiologist.
In the rare person unable to tolerate medical treatment catheter ablation (burning) of the sinus node with insertion of a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> or surgical removal of the sinus node have been used in the past. Newer techniques are being developed using catheter ablation to modify and not destroy the sinus node thus avoiding the need for a pacemaker. This procedure is still in it's infancy and should only be undertaken at a major medical center after consultation with an electrophysiologist.
A followup to my situation. I had mitral valve replacement 5/21/03 and <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> insertion. I had a normal EF, coronary arteries etc. After surgery, I had heart failure, atr fib/flutter requiring 7 cardioversions. Followup echos showed a tissue mass at the posterior ventricular border but echos show MV functioning well at rest. I complained but never got anywhere except adding drugs etc. So, I sought a second opinion from a cardiologist with an expertise in pulm HTN.
With an EF of 35% I was advised to take the full monty, 100mg dose of Coreg after my pacemaker insertion. I just couldn't handle it, I'm 6'3" and weigh 195. 50 mg is all I can do, but I also take Lisinopril and also I think Ranexa maximizes the effect of Coreg and minimizes my angina.
In the rare person unable to tolerate medical treatment catheter ablation (burning) of the sinus node with insertion of a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> or surgical removal of the sinus node have been used in the past. Newer techniques are being developed using catheter ablation to modify and not destroy the sinus node thus avoiding the need for a pacemaker. I've tried to answer your specific questions below. 1.
Be vary of cardiologist that suggest such a drastic treatment for IST such as ablation of the sinus with insertion of a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span>. IST is nearly always a benign but uncomfortable condition, you are very young consult with more EPs. Sometime IST improve with age, get more opinions . Good luck.
In the rare person unable to tolerate medical treatment catheter ablation (burning) of the sinus node with insertion of a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>pacemaker</span> or surgical removal of the sinus node have been used in the past. Newer techniques are being developed using catheter ablation to modify and not destroy the sinus node thus avoiding the need for a pacemaker. This procedure is still in it's infancy and should only be undertaken at a major medical center after consultation with an electrophysiologist.
Bodoni, Thanks for the post. Nuclear stress test tend to overestimate the degree of ventricular dysfucntion. The echo will be important to tell you if you have ventricular dysfucntion and whether there is any structural abnormality that led to it (Valvular stenosis, etc.) It is also important to investigate other causes such as thyroid dysfucntion, coronary disease and high blood pressure.
When I had a bleed at the catheter insertion <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>site</span> later I had another drug becuase the nurse put pressure on the vagus nerve when pressing on the bleed site in my groin and they had to put something in my line when my heart slowed right down and I passed out. I am quite sensitive to drugs so your explanation makes sense. I'm only about 4 days past the procedure so I will just have to be patient and see what comes.
I had an Ablation, Cardiac Cath & pacemaker/ICD implanted all the same week about a month ago. I didn't have a tube inserted on any of them; and was under wakeful sedation; ask your dr, but I think most don't use them for these types of procedures.
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