Pacemaker insertion procedure

Common Questions and Answers about Pacemaker insertion procedure

pacemaker

The focus of my longstanding atrial arrhythmia has not been located in 2 EP studies and I have not done well on drugs. My cardiologist has mentioned the possibility of AV node ablation and pacemaker insertion. He said that some people feel "waves" in the neck after this procedure. What do the waves feel like (e.g. painful, flushing), do they eventually subside and are they of any prognostic significance? Thanks for dealing with my questions.
He also insisted that I immediately be transported to the hospital for a pacemaker, that day - before the evening. Once or twice a month, I do feel a bit lightheaded but usually after just standing up quickly, No other symptoms than that. here is what the Dr. noted on my chart "1st deg Blk w/episodes of 2nd deg and 5 Multifocal VE beats & SV beats. Included in the SV Beats were 8 couplets. There were 64 episodes of Bradycardia & 1,763 pauses. Longest pause @ 6.3 secs.
Often prior to an ablation a Dr will request a TEE (transesopogeal echocardiograph) This procedure requires the insertion of a tube through your mouth and down your throat so that they wan insert a probe and do an echo right next to the heart to check for blood clots. They numb you out to do this and it is really no big deal although you may experience a sore throat for a couple day.
We are trying to figure out if we should go direclty to the insertion of a pacemaker vs. an ablasion procedure. Since ablasion procedure may need to be repeated and flecainide (drug after ablasion) is questionable, should we just go directly to the pacemaker?
Hi, The pacemaker replacement surgery can be done during the pregnancy and there’s definitely risk to the growing fetus due to the radiation exposure which occurs during the insertion of the pacemaker to see the correct positioning of the leads, although lead shields are placed to avoid exposure to the baby. Nowadays, to avoid the same, the positioning of the leads can be done with the help of echocardiography and evaluation of the electro physiologic signals.
Normally, she should not have such pain after the insertion of the pacemaker. Maybe its position is causing some muscle spasm that is affecting her arm. The best option is to take her back to the doctor who inserted the pacemaker and explain the situation to him. If she has some fever, it may mean that the pacemaker place is infected and needs an urgent intervention.
Of course, if the patient is continually in AF, this will not work. Pacemaker insertion can be considered if any of the options are associated with your condition. You may discuss about these with your cardiologist. Hope that this information helps and hope that you will get better soon. Thank you for using MedHelp's "Ask an Expert" Service, where we feature some of world's renowned medical experts in their fields.
Prior to the insertion of the pacemaker (for bradycardia) I ran 15-20 miles a week, and exercised regularly -- swimming, basketball, tennis, golf. Will I be able to resume all this again? I need some closure and assurance that the pericardial window has solved all my problems. Do I need to visit the Cleveland Clinic for an evaluation, or are there tests my Cardiologist in HI should be performing to ease my mind. I never want to experience that gripping pain again, if it can be avoided.
He said I would have to be on Coumadin and heart meds forever after the other two procedures, but only be on Coumadin after the pacemaker insertion. Does that sound right? I'm looking for the option that will make the AF GO AWAY, and I don't need to take meds ANY MORE. Is there such a thing?
I subsequently developed a lower atrial pacemaker and did not require permanent pacemaker insertion. Within months after the surgery I developed another pacer site high in the superior vena cava which caused tachycardia and then later on junctional tachycardia. 7 years after that I was diagnosed with atrial flutter and av node re-entry tachycardia.
I subsequently developed a lower atrial pacemaker and did not require permanent pacemaker insertion. Within months after the surgery I developed another pacer site high in the superior vena cava which caused tachycardia and then later on junctional tachycardia. 7 years after that I was diagnosed with atrial flutter and av node re-entry tachycardia.
AV node ablation with a pacemaker insertion is used to treat refractory atrial arrhythmias that are unresponsive to medications and direct current cardioversion. While the atria will still remain in fibrillation or flutter, those impulses are no longer transmitted to the ventricles and the heart rate is thus controlled. During the procedure, radiofrequency energy is used to ablate the AV node and a permanent pacemaker is inserted to pace the ventricle.
After the EP does some tests, s/he will be able to assess your condition better. The pacemaker was a worst case scenareo. Even then, getting a pacemaker for bradycardia is no big deal and won't restrict your lifestyle. I know guys who have pacemakers and are active runners and atheletes. Also, the tests may show nothing unusual.
The doctor who inserted my pacemaker is a specialist in that procedure and not my regular cardiologist. I think he did a good job and the atrial fib was just part of the process. At first I was stunned that you'd been through 50 cardioversions in the last 20 years. But when I realized that I'd had 5 in two years, I could easily see how they pile up. The pacemaker cannot prevent PVCs. But it can keep your heart in a normal rhythm which may prevent the frequency of your PVCs.
P.S. I had an AV-node block along with the insertion of the pacemaker. Believe it or not, I have taught Aerobics for 15 years!! Now, what??
AV Node ablation and Pacemaker insertion (Medtronic INSYNC III BiV--no cardiomyopathy, but it was offered to me by my surgeon and I said YES! to prevent possibility of ventricular paced induced cardiomyopathy). PACEMAKER SETTINGS: Low of 75 and high of 140. Pacing 80% in atria, 100% in ventricles. MEDS: Tarka 2/240mg TID, ASA 325mg Niaspan, Synthroid, Cytomel, Zyrtec, Singulair. I was on Coumadin but stopped it one month ago, per my EP.
Dear Dr. I am a 35 Y.O female who underwent a pacemaker insertion 6 months ago, after 8 weeks of arrythmia and awful pain it was discovered that the ventricular lead had actually perforated my heart and was sitting in the pericardium, hence it was removed (with no dire consequences) except pnuemothorax and paralised arm for 12 hours! I am fully recovered now but still have lots and lots of PVC's and funny thumpings going on, most days this happens for several hours.
My doctor is planing on repeating the Holter and echo and reccommending that I see an EP doctor in Bethesda (military). I have been told that if I have an ablation, I will most likley need a pacemaker. I have been dealing with this condition for 1 and a half years and I've come to terms with the idea of a pacemaker because my quality of life right now is poor due to the dyspnea, SOB, activity intolerance etc. My question is ...
For the first month after a pacemaker insertion, you couldn't lift weights, but after that, you should be able to exercise and do the activities you describe. 2) There are mostly logistic restrictions with pacemakers. For example, a pacemaker would set off a metal detector so you couldn't go through one with a pacemaker. Also, an MRI couldn't be done because it could dislodge the pacemaker.
Posted By DOUG on July 24, 1998 at 04:11:45: In Reply to: Re: PACEMAKER LIFESTYLE RESTRICTIONS posted by CCF CARDIO MD - MTR on July 10, 1998 at 12:07:00: To answer my question, I need to give you some medical background. I had a tripple bypass done in March 1991. My problem was found on a routine physical. I had no heart attack symptoms or problems. My cardologist found that I have had sometime in my life, a heart attack.
It is important for all patients to have a discussion with their physician regarding the risks and benefits of each procedure. Each patient is different and each procedure may have different risks. I hope this has been useful. I wish you the best of luck. Feel free to write back. Information provided here is for general purposes only. Specific questions should be addressed to your own doctor.
But again, Eddie, it is not a matter of the E.P. screwing up, it is an intentional procedure, which unfortunately ends up in a pacemaker a large percentage of the time. I just wanted to clear that up because sometimes it makes the E.P. look bad, when indeed that was the intention. Good luck Emily, I hope everything works out well for you and your quality of life happens again real soon. Also, Eddie, I hope everything works out well for you too.
07:23 Dear Emily, I'm kind of in the same situation,except I've been having arrythmias for 7 yrs. now. It started with intermittant episodes of SVT for the first couple of yrs.until I was put on meds.i.e.,betablockers than the rapid rates, 135-190 bpm. were suppressed for the most part or as long as I stayed on the meds.However, the side effects are terrible,and now I get PVC's which were infrequent in the beginning but now are becoming frequent and intolerable to say the least!
But again, Eddie, it is not a matter of the E.P. screwing up, it is an intentional procedure, which unfortunately ends up in a pacemaker a large percentage of the time. I just wanted to clear that up because sometimes it makes the E.P. look bad, when indeed that was the intention. Good luck Emily, I hope everything works out well for you and your quality of life happens again real soon. Also, Eddie, I hope everything works out well for you too.
But again, Eddie, it is not a matter of the E.P. screwing up, it is an intentional procedure, which unfortunately ends up in a pacemaker a large percentage of the time. I just wanted to clear that up because sometimes it makes the E.P. look bad, when indeed that was the intention. Good luck Emily, I hope everything works out well for you and your quality of life happens again real soon. Also, Eddie, I hope everything works out well for you too.
But again, Eddie, it is not a matter of the E.P. screwing up, it is an intentional procedure, which unfortunately ends up in a pacemaker a large percentage of the time. I just wanted to clear that up because sometimes it makes the E.P. look bad, when indeed that was the intention. Good luck Emily, I hope everything works out well for you and your quality of life happens again real soon. Also, Eddie, I hope everything works out well for you too.
But again, Eddie, it is not a matter of the E.P. screwing up, it is an intentional procedure, which unfortunately ends up in a pacemaker a large percentage of the time. I just wanted to clear that up because sometimes it makes the E.P. look bad, when indeed that was the intention. Good luck Emily, I hope everything works out well for you and your quality of life happens again real soon. Also, Eddie, I hope everything works out well for you too.
A disclaimer - I am not a licensed medical professional. The opinions expressed below are my own opinions and should not be construed as medical advice. Pre-ablation - A few general notes: ----------------------------------------------- Two weeks before ablation, stopped all exercise per doctor’s orders. Reduced Atenolol to 2/3 normal dose on the day of the stress test only, per doctor’s orders. Three days prior to ablation, I was instructed to stop taking Atenolol.
Hi! Though mood disturbances are maximum after brain surgeries, they are also seen after pacemaker insertion. However, usually the quality of life and mood is better after pacemaker surgery, instances of depression and poor mood have also been documented. So, if there has been a drastic change in mood post surgery, please inform her doctor regarding this. The mood change may not be due to pacemaker but due to any oxygen deficit to the brain due to any cause.
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