Pacemaker battery recall

Common Questions and Answers about Pacemaker battery recall

pacemaker

3 weeks ago I had a Pacemaker replacement due to the fact my battery on my Pacemaker was running low. The new Pacemaker installed is a Medtronic Adapta. Since the new pacemaker my Heart beat has been all over the place. My 1st Enrhythym was paced at 80 bpm, and it pretty much stayed like that for 5.5 years until the battery started to go. The problem is is that the new Pacemaker is not like that at all! My heartbeat goes from 56 to 93, back to 71 then 86, and has gone a high as 100.
my skin is bruised, very sensitive etc, but not open. There's some swelling of the pocket. This pacemaker is my second of which I have had since Dec 99 and due to my complete heart block I am completely dependent on it. I'm 34 and recently was hospitalized for aggressive treatment of possible infection. While I was hospitalized for only 3 days I had numerous blood tests, cultures, scans etc. I have had no fever, the pocket is not warm, not a single test showed I had any infection.
I am not sure if it was related to her pacemaker or her heart condition, but she could not do things such as wash the floor. Her battery in her pacemaker lasted 11 years. Her leads were still good after that time and did not need to be replaced. Her pacemaker served her well and was working 100 percent of the time when she was inactive. I would imagine that golfing itself would be hard to do with heart problems.
Hi, I have sick sinus syndrome and I have had my pacemaker since 2003. It is very close to time to replace the battery but I am having serious issues with the Dr's in my area. During the summer I was told I needed a new battery within the year. My question is....What symptoms might I experience when my pm battery actually dies? I don't think I will be able to find a Dr in time and want to know what I might have to endure. I am only 48 but don't feel I will make it to 50 because of my issue.
My ep rotates the brands; so if there's a recall they don't have 100% of patients who need them redone. I'm a member of an icd forum and have read alot of different things about preferences. If you want that link, pm me and I'll be glad to give it to you, they're a great bunch of people and lots of useful information on there. I have a Boston Scientific Teligen 100 with Guidant leads; it's so small most people would never even know I have it.
I'd one lead pacemaker before and the lead was leaking. Battery was 11 years old. I was a bit naughty because I didn't turn up for my pacemaker follow up. I just disappered until I had my irregular pulse. They had to pull out the old lead and give me 2 leads and a new pacer. I didn't have my pacer infected. After a week, I felt pain in my pocket. I went to ER and the doctor told me something about the pocket. If I'm not felt well they would find another place to make the pocket.
Wires that connect the electronic circuit to other components in the pacemaker, such as the battery or connector, could separate resulting in potential loss of rate response, premature battery failure, loss of telemetry or no output. This could cause return of bradycardia symptoms or potentially result in death or serious injury. Medtronic has notified doctors that there is no testing that can predict whether one of their pacemakers may fail and no device re-programming can reduce the risk.
Need an upgraded pacemaker? Pacemaker recall? What kind and what brand of your pacemaker? Do you have the serial number? You can directly contact the producer and find out why? Mine is St Jude and implanted in 2002. Still got 3 years to go. Once stage they said all the professional needed to download a programme because it reading the battery life in error. The programme in error but NOT the pacemaker itself. http://www.medscape.
It was replaced because the battery was getting low and the unit had been on a recall list for many years. The new pacemaker was moved above the location of the original's position. The original electrode was left in the heart. In May '98 he had the second pacemaker replaced due to infection (the wires at the pacemaker were protruding from the skin)and it was put on the opposite side of the body. Now Jan '99 he is having to have the third pacemaker replaced again due to infection.
It was replaced because the battery was getting low and the unit had been on a recall list for many years. The new pacemaker was moved above the location of the original's position. The original electrode was left in the heart. In May '98 he had the second pacemaker replaced due to infection (the wires at the pacemaker were protruding from the skin)and it was put on the opposite side of the body.
It doesn't store information like a pacemaker (so many pvc's, so many vt's, etc)? And will you have it removed at some point in time? How many leads?
So they did surgeries, and installed a pacemaker as well. Both cardiologists have told me that I need to control, my adrenaline. As this is almost 100% of the cause of my WPW incidents. Hence the ativan. The anxiety only sets in once the WPW has hit it's peak. Then the anxiety releases more adrenaline, which makes the WPW worse to deal with.No WPW symptoms,no anxiety.No stress, no WPW. So it's a snowball effect. That's why I was asking about medications, and if anyone has had any experience.
When 48 hours of constant monitoring showed no improvement an EP cardiologist was consulted and the decision was made to implant a permanent dual chamber pacemaker. It was done within hours. **On to the question we always end up asking here.** Is this connected to the MS? IN MY CASE there is apparently A GOOD CHANCE MS CONTRIBUTED to this newest diagnosis.
They acknowledged that her lead was bad, and that SOMETHING was running the battery down, on her pacemaker, but denied that she could feel an electrical shock that would then set off something that apparently feels just like the MS Hug. (If she has this sensation w/o the pacemaker that is really going to open up a whole new line of concern!) I don't see why a short in that lead wire couldn't produce that same sort of sensation.
how long is the surgery, will i be in the hospital overnight, what limitations will i have in life if any, will i have it permanently, what can i expect to feel when it goes off or detects a shockable rhythm, what do i need to avoid, will i have to take medications while i have it in, what brand of defib are you going to use (and then look it up to make sure there has never been a recall on it), how long will the defib last in my body meaning what is the shelf life and will it ever have to be re
(I ask because I'm making sure you're not referring to 24 hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.) Do you recall what the result of the EP study was? Also, what were the results of the tilt table test? Presumably it was positive for something, and thus the midodrine, or am I missing something? Did they explain any of this in detail to you? (If not, I am definitely LOUDLY seconding Tonya's opinion that you consider seeking a second opinion.
1) How long will the battery last? Will regular physical exercise shorten the battery life, prompting a ICD replacement earlier than the anticipated 4-7 years? I do cardio rehab 3-5 times a week and can take daily long walks with the dog. 2) I have been reading about the Sprint Fidelis leads recall and the high risk (death) during extraction for replacement of the cables. Before the implant prodecure I asked the nurse practioner to identify which device I was getting.
I have been maximized on the usual CHF drugs. I do have a permanent pacemaker (100% VVVI pacing) as a result of AV nodal ablation. Now they are planning to change my pacer to biventricular. In preparation for that procedure, I wore a holter. The holter showed several episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia. So now, the plan is to do EP studies prior to the procedure to see if VT can be induced. Is so, I will need an ICD. I have several questions: 1.
I use the quick convert quite often due to high VT runs and have about 8 years left on my battery but I'm not pacemaker dependent. I did go through quite alot of "tweaks" getting my settings right but it was because I kept fainting with my hr's so they would up my rates.
They became so severe that one day, my heart rate went up to 140 and I felt sick to my stomach and thought I was having a heart attack (I am only 34-not that that matters). So, I went for a battery of tests, heart monitor etc. and the cardiologist said it was smoking and coffee and I couldn't be treated until I gave up both. April 2000 I started taking Zyban again. I quit this time for 2 weeks.
She was 83 when her second pacemaker gave out. I come from a strong line of a Russian/Polish stock. At 60 years of age, I should have joined my family years ago with all my medical problems and 'issues' with life but I am still here and willing to lend any support I can, so don't let the fear of life overtake you. I plan on being here a while so we can stay strong together, RIGHT!
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