Oily skin in dogs

Common Questions and Answers about Oily skin in dogs

skin

I have had her for about 4 months now and she is having skin problems. There are a few patches of missing hair on her and she has <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> skin. I am worried that this might be a serious problem. She has a 2 month old puppy (she was pregnant when I got her) and I dont know if this is something contagious. Please help.!
Malassezia, a skin yeast can also turn the skin black but this hyperpigmentation is usually secondary to skin allergies and inflammation. You may have to have this biopsied or have a skin scraping performed at your vet's for a definitive diagnosis.
The most common reasons for itchy skin in <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> include skin infections, microscopic skin parasites such as fleas, scabies or demodex mites, food allergy, or pollen/dust allergies. Unfortunately, Shih Tzus are a breed commonly affected by allergies. The oily skin may be due to a secondary bacterial or yeast skin infection, and a weekly mild antimicrobial shampoo such as KetoChlor may be helpful.
Both food allergy and pollen/dust allergies can cause recurrent skin infections in <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span>, as can hormonal conditions such as hypothyroidism. Please take him to your veterinarian this week to be assessed, and if infection is confirmed, then a 3-4 week course of antibiotics and anitbacterial shampoos will be needed. But keep in mind that until the underlying cause of the skin infection is appropriately diagnosed and treated, it will likely recur when antibiotics are finished.
i believe I have cutaneous fungi in my skin. Everyone in my family thinks I am seeing things because these items are everywhere. In my carper, burrowed into food and harder substances. I just don't understand why I see these items (that sometimes look similar to very small worms jellyfish or geometric shapes such as circles, triangles and lines) and others don't. I wonder if I am hallucinating but, I have taken photos of the sores and red lines, circles etc.
Some dogs have very <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> coats that make it easier for bacteria to grow. it's the bacteria in the coat and skin that cause that doggy smell. If it's not bacteria, it could be from a fungal infection. You could try Selsun Blue shampoo (people shampoo) as a cheap over-the-counter remedy for a fungal skin problem. There are also fungal shampoos you can get at the pet store that may help as well. Where dog shampoos are concerned, avoid the heavily fragranced ones.
A crawling sensation in skin is seen in people who are very anxious and stressed out. Very dry skin (you rule this out) and disorders of thyroid gland all can precipitate a crawling sensation. The other possibility is Morgellons disease often mimics scabies. The disease is believed to be caused by weak immune systems in people that have contracted the tick-borne Lyme Disease at some point in their life. it can also be a fungal infection like Tinea corporis.
I have extremely sensetive skin myself and had to resort to baby lotion and shampoos to keep me from overdrying my skin. Many lotions make the skin <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> rather than truly moisturize. Cetaphil is a good lotion, but I use Aveeno baby lotion. it seems to do the trick. What soaps do you use? Dial AB or Dove, ?? ?
All dogs need shampooing regardless. <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span>, like many hounds, have very <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> skin that can harbor bacteria resulting in a very smelly dog. Such dogs will need a bath at least once a week. If you can't afford a groomer or don't have the time to take care of your dog's coat, you shouldn't have a dog. Living Conditions. As the result of domestic breeding over centuries, your dog is not capable of living in on its own in the wild - at least, not for long.
(like maybe 2 drinks a day) Also, I have very <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> skin and have always used a scrub with salacylic acid and then read that it wasn't safe; is that true? And if so, what do people with oily skin use? does anybody know about bacon? Is it okay if eaten once or twice a week? Can I use a fleets enema if I'm really really constipated? I know these are things I can ask my doctor, but my first ob appt. isn't until the 31st.
Last june we found a small subcutaneous (under skin and not visible)cyst on his left side by his hip but not really it was more on his skin(the fatty area) Anyway, we took him in september to have it aspirated, and there was nothing but clear liquid so the vet diagnosed it immediately as a cyst. I, being the paranoid person that I am, wanted a second opinion..I made an appt with a vet 1 week later. During the period between appts, winston developed an abcess at the aspiration site.
Fish oils and all <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> fish are extremely good for <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span>. Omega 3 oils, all-round healthy for dogs and people. Tuna, sardines, salmon, mackerel.....(mind the bones. They can be dangerous of course) The bones in canned fish are ok, they are softer and not only edible but an excellent source of calcium too.
I've had eczema in my ears for 15 yrs. it is very cyclical, starting w/intense uncontrollable itching, then clear fluid leaking from skin, followed by crusting over & flaking of skin in ears that is itchy in & of itself, leading to more scratching & picking at ears. The skin in my ears gets very damaged and ratty during outbreaks. I also have swelling of the ear canal after these itch/scratch episodes that are sometimes quite painful, & Motrin helps that. ENT Dr.
I hadn't had much luck in the past with giving up dairy because I love milk, and soymilk and almond milk just didn't do it for me...they felt '<span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span>' in my mouth. But I've just found Rice Milk, and I'm delighted to say that for me, it's a wonderful milk substitute. Rice Milk has a lovely, light flavor that actually reminds me a bit of the flavor of 100% whole milk, without feeling thick and oily.
I don't have allergies of any kind and I'm in excellent health and I can learn to live with the smell of fresh baked bread in my nostrils.. I mean it could be owrse.. still I think I should get someone to check this out especially as I read about Phantom smells being a possible side efect of brain tumors...
it got better, cleared up for awhile, then came back with a vengence, only the stupid vet clinic I took him to had a moron treating him for skin allergies instead of mange and never even did a skin scraping. So not only did the demodex come back with a vengence, but I spent an arm and a leg treating him for allergies that he never had, and nearly all his hair fell out and he mutilated literally half the skin on his body from chewing and scratching.
I have used "Brewer's Yeast" mixed in with the dogs' food. for some reason, fleas can't tolerate it. Don't know if it effects ticks though. Interesting topic. I hope you get some good suggestions - I might just "borrow" them for my own dogs who take Sentinel for fleas, etc. Natural is better, I agree.
(Show dogs get bathed more often, but the shampoos are different) Bathing with the wrong ingrediants like dish liquids ect cause the wrong PH balance in the skin and can cause problems. If you are giving olive oil, you could be giving too much or too often and that could cause problems with the coat. You could have a dog who already has oily skin and coat making it appear to be wet. Talk to a good breeder and get advice from them. If you need help with this PM me and I'll try and help.
We have ours on a Nutro skin sensitivity, somthing its in a light green bag. it helps with shedding and its got good vitamins in it. That is worth a try. I know some people give there dogs canned pumpkin to and its supposed to be good for them. I hope this helps.
In an older dog, the first step is to perform full labwork and thyroid panel to identify any internal diseases, and to perform skin scrapings and skin cytology to look for skin parasites and infection. If bloodwork abnormalties are found, then further diagnostics/treatment are prescribed based on the lab results. If skin infection is found, then antibiotics for 3-4 weeks would be needed.
Despite sweating all over, and in my left armpit as well, there is no BO elsewhere...only on one small patch of skin in my right armpit. Is this related to having cellulitis in that arm, or is the BO a co-incicidence? Is it here to stay? it is causing me some embarrassment. I have one other fear as well.
I was researching this online tonight, but came up with such rubbish! And some of it sounded dangerous for <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> (Citronella/large amounts of garlic in the food(!).....) I happen to know Citronella doesn't work as an insect repellent anyway. I tried it once. But I do know it is toxic for dogs. does anyone have any suggestions?
If the older dog is having any sort of discharge from a wound, anal glands or even <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> skin this could have attracted the other dog in the first place - now a habit. I would separate them for a while either in the house (different rooms or floors) or by crating. If possible have poodle visit a friend for two weeks. Then get the older guy a quick exam to be sure you don't have a medical issue going on. Treat any medical issues if found.
You might try adding some Omega 3 daily and, knowing you, you probably don't feed any food with corn in it. When I showed <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span>, we would try our hardest to try to keep them in coat to be shown. Many people have air conditioned kennels and mist the dog's coats regularly trying to hold that coat as long as they can. Of course, the females were the hardest as they do blow coat after a heat cycle. I can sympathize with the hair everywhere.
NO~NO~NO!!!! Don't put Dettol on her skin! it's a cleaning product like Lysol (In the US). This will inflame her skin to the point of no return! You don't say what Flea products you've used, but it sounds as if you've already overdone it.....If they are topical products, skin reactions can occur from them alone.....These meds. are strong!!! Don't make the mistake of adding a flea/tick shampoo to all of this, as a reaction to the combination could literally kill her!
com/products/dogs/dry_food/sierra_mountain_canine_formula/ how long does it take for a dog food to completely be in a <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> system? or i guess how long will it take for the food with grain in it to get out of his system. The hot spot spray is suppose to dry them out? its really oily & says on the bottle for itchy dry skin... He seems to be doing a little better with it too.
Therefore, the inflammatory effects of flax seed may not be quite as powerful as the effects contained in fish oils. <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> can also become hyper-allergic to extreme levels of flax seed oil (which symptoms show as flaky and oily skin). This is called seborrhea oleosa and isn't dangerous to a dog's health, as such (it's not toxic, for example), but it's worth noting. Hope this helps.
i use baby shampoo and put a little of avon skin so soft in it fleas hate the smell of it , its really <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> so i mix it in with shampo and bath her in it once a week so far no fleas. i hate putting the flea meds on her to so not going to.
it's the bacteria that give off the smell. Even healthy <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>dogs</span> who have very <span style = 'background-color: #dae8f4'>oily</span> coats will stink because the oil holds bacteria. Poor little baby! She sounds like a such a sweetheart and nobody can pet her. I'll bet Dr. Cheng will have some good ideas to overcome the stench. Hang in there!
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